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How can I write an algorithm to check if the sum of any two numbers in an array/list matches a given number with a complexity of nlogn?

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1  
What do you expect as output? The numbers? Their index? What if more than one results is possible? –  Marcel Apr 19 '10 at 10:41
1  
Do you want a true/false answer "yes, there is a couple" or do you want all pairs? Or all possible combinations that gives the demanded sum? –  bjornhol Apr 19 '10 at 10:42

10 Answers 10

up vote 22 down vote accepted

I'm sure there's a better way, but here's an idea:

  1. Sort array
  2. For every element e in the array, binary search for the complement (sum - e)

Both these operations are O(n log n).

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2  
Also, after sorting, discard all the numbers which are bigger than sum. I assume that you have all positive integers. –  Jack Apr 19 '10 at 11:03
    
yeah that's what i though and then i got all busy trying to compute the complexity it never occured to me that both the operations are o(nlogn) –  Bunny Rabbit Apr 19 '10 at 11:34
    
You don't have to search for every elements actually. Since you've sorted the array, stop searching at sum/2 (doesn't impact the big O, but still :p) –  Matthieu M. Apr 19 '10 at 13:27

Use a hash table. Insert every number into your hash table, along with its index. Then, let S be your desired sum. For every number array[i] in your initial array, see if S - array[i] exists in your hash table with an index different than i.

Average case is O(n), worst case is O(n^2), so use the binary search solution if you're afraid of the worst case.

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1  
I don't get the worst case. Using a hash table should get you O(1) on insertion and look-up (with some care) or do you account for potential hash conflicts ? Anyway this seems even better than using binary search. –  Matthieu M. Apr 19 '10 at 13:27
3  
Yes, there could be hash conflicts. For example, consider the array {1, 1, 1, ..., 1, 1, 1, ...} that contains n ones. We want to make the sum 20. You would add all the ones in the same position in the hash table. Then, for each 1 you would check if 19 is in the array. Let's assume that the value 19 maps to the same location in your hash table that the value 1 does. This means that for each of the n ones you will do n checks in your hash table, giving you quadratic time complexity. Similar examples can be found for the case where there is a solution (use 3 values - one dominant) –  IVlad Apr 19 '10 at 13:32
1  
you could map the frequency as the value for each associated number. so if you have 8 1s, the hash will map 1 => 8. When a sum of 2 is desired, for example, you put an additional check - if the current number equals the target number (S - array[i]), then it's frequency must be at least 2. –  Anurag Apr 19 '10 at 18:34

This can be done in O(n) using a hash table. Initialize the table with all numbers in the array, with number as the key, and frequency as the value. Walk through each number in the array, and see if (sum - number) exists in the table. If it does, you have a match. After you've iterated through all numbers in the array, you should have a list of all pairs that sum up to the desired number.

array = initial array
table = hash(array)
S = sum

for each n in array
    if table[S-n] exists
        print "found numbers" n, S-n

The case where n and table[S-n] refer to the same number twice can be dealt with an extra check, but the complexity remains O(n).

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1  
This should be the accepted answer since it is O(n) whilst the accepted answer is O(n logn) –  justinhj Mar 8 '13 at 18:17
    
It should not be accepted as the best answer unless the author can explain how his proposed solution would handle non-distinct sets of inputs. (What if some of the numbers in the initially randomized suite are duplicates of one another)? –  Jim Dennis Jun 19 at 17:50
    
The value in the hash table will represent the number of times a number appears in the list. That will allow handling of duplicates. –  Anurag Aug 6 at 3:37

Let us say that we want to find two numbers in the array A that when added together equal N.

  1. Sort the array.
  2. Find the largest number in the array that is less than N/2. Set the index of that number as lower.
  3. Initialize upper to be lower + 1.
  4. Set sum = A[lower] + A[upper].
  5. If sum == N, done.
  6. If sum < N, increment upper.
  7. If sum > N, decrement lower.
  8. If either lower or upper is outside the array, done without any matches.
  9. Go back to 4.

The sort can be done in O(n log n). The search is done in linear time.

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This is in Java : This even removes the possible duplicates....

private static int[] intArray = {15,5,10,20,25,30};
private static int sum = 35;

private static void algorithm()
{
    Map<Integer, Integer> intMap = new Hashtable<Integer, Integer>();
    for (int i=0; i<intArray.length; i++) 
    {
        intMap.put(i, intArray[i]);
        if(intMap.containsValue(sum - intArray[i]))
            System.out.println("Found numbers : "+intArray[i] +" and "+(sum - intArray[i]));

    }
    System.out.println(intMap);
}
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def sum_in(numbers, sum_):
    """whether any two numbers from `numbers` form `sum_`."""
    a = set(numbers) # O(n)
    return any((sum_ - n) in a for n in a) # O(n)

Example:

>>> sum_in([200, -10, -100], 100)
True
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Note: this solution allows repetition i.e., it doesn't distinguish [1] and [1, 1] cases. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 19 '10 at 12:34

Here's a try in C. This isn't marked homework.

// Assumes a sorted integer array with no duplicates
void printMatching(int array[], int size, int sum)
{
   int i = 0, k = size - 1;
   int curSum;
   while(i < k)
   {
      curSum = array[i] + array[k];
      if(curSum == sum)
      {
         printf("Found match at indices %d, %d\n", i, k);
         i++;k--;
      }
      else if(curSum < sum)
      {
         i++;
      }
      else
      {
         k--;
      }
   }
}

Here is some test output using int a[] = { 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 15, 17 };

Searching for 12..
Found match at indices 0, 5
Found match at indices 1, 3
Searching for 22...
Found match at indices 1, 8
Found match at indices 3, 7
Found match at indices 5, 6
Searching for 4..
Searching for 50..

The search is linear, so O(n). The sort that takes place behind the scenes is going to be O(n*logn) if you use one of the good sorts.

Because of the math behind Big-O, the smaller term in additive terms will effectively drop out of your calculation, and you end up with O(n logn).

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This one is O(n)

public static bool doesTargetExistsInList(int Target, int[] inputArray)
{
    if (inputArray != null && inputArray.Length > 0 )
    {
        Hashtable inputHashTable = new Hashtable();

        // This hash table will have all the items in the input array and how many times they appeard
        Hashtable duplicateItems = new Hashtable();

        foreach (int i in inputArray)
        {
            if (!inputHashTable.ContainsKey(i))
            {
                inputHashTable.Add(i, Target - i);
                duplicateItems.Add(i, 1);
            }
            else
            {
                duplicateItems[i] = (int)duplicateItems[i] + 1;    
            }

        }

        foreach (DictionaryEntry de in inputHashTable)
        {
            if ((int)de.Key == (int)de.Value)
            {
                if ((int)duplicateItems[de.Key] > 1)
                return true;
            }
            else if (inputHashTable.ContainsKey(de.Value))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}
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1  
This uses 2 passes. But it could be done in just 1 pass, right? –  dchang Oct 17 '12 at 3:20

Depends If you want only one sum O(N) or O(N log N) or all sums O(N^2) or O(N^2 log N). In the latter case better uses an FFT>

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Step 1 : Sort the array in O(n logn)

Step 2 : Find two indices

0<=i<j<=n in a[0..n] such that a[i]+a[j]==k, where k is given key.

int i=0,j=n;
while(i<j) {
   int sum = a[i]+a[j];
   if(sum == k)
        print(i,j)
   else if (sum < k)
        i++;
   else if (sum > k)
        j--;
}
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