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My root problem is that when using calls Dispose on a StreamWriter, it also disposes the BaseStream (same problem with Close).

I have a workaround for this, but as you can see it involves copying the stream. Is there any way to do this without copying the stream?

The purpose of this is to get the contents of a string (originally read from a database) into a stream, so the stream can be read by a third party component.
NB I cannot change the third party component.

public System.IO.Stream CreateStream(string value)
{
    var baseStream = new System.IO.MemoryStream();
    var baseCopy = new System.IO.MemoryStream();
    using (var writer = new System.IO.StreamWriter(baseStream, System.Text.Encoding.UTF8))
    {
        writer.Write(value);
        writer.Flush();
        baseStream.WriteTo(baseCopy); 
    }
    baseCopy.Seek(0, System.IO.SeekOrigin.Begin);
    return baseCopy;
}

Used as

public void Noddy()
{
    System.IO.Stream myStream = CreateStream("The contents of this string are unimportant");
    My3rdPartyComponent.ReadFromStream(myStream);
}

Ideally I'm looking for an imaginery method called BreakAssociationWithBaseStream, e.g.

public System.IO.Stream CreateStream_Alternate(string value)
{
    var baseStream = new System.IO.MemoryStream();
    using (var writer = new System.IO.StreamWriter(baseStream, System.Text.Encoding.UTF8))
    {
        writer.Write(value);
        writer.Flush();
        writer.BreakAssociationWithBaseStream();
    }
    return baseStream;
}
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This is a similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2620851 –  Jens Granlund Apr 19 '10 at 12:10
    
I was doing this with a stream from a WebRequest, interestingly, you can close it if the encoding is ASCII but not UTF8. Weird. –  tofutim Mar 28 '13 at 22:40
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5 Answers

up vote 36 down vote accepted

If you are using .NET Framework 4.5 or later, there is a StreamWriter overload using which you can ask the base stream to be left open when the writer is closed.

In earlier versions of .NET Framework prior to 4.5, StreamWriter assumes it owns the stream. Options:

  • Don't dispose the StreamWriter; just flush it.
  • Create a stream wrapper which ignores calls to Close/Dispose but proxies everything else along. I have an implementation of that in MiscUtil, if you want to grab it from there.
share|improve this answer
    
That'll do nicely. Thanks :) –  Binary Worrier Apr 19 '10 at 12:06
    
@Binary Worrier: I have no problems with that at all. Admittedly my answer gave that option as well, but let's spread the joy :) –  Jon Skeet Apr 20 '10 at 9:07
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.NET 4.5 got new method fot that!

http://msdn.microsoft.com/EN-US/library/gg712853(v=VS.110,d=hv.2).aspx

public StreamWriter(
    Stream stream,
    Encoding encoding,
    int bufferSize,
    bool leaveOpen
)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks mate! Did not know this, and if anything that would be a fine reason for me to start targeting .NET 4.5! –  Vectovox Jan 15 at 13:54
    
Shame there is no overload that doesn't require bufferSize to be set. I'm happy with the default there. I'm having to pass it myself. Not the end of the world. –  Andy McCluggage Feb 27 at 14:57
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Memory stream has a ToArray property that can be used even when stream is closed. To Array writes the stream contents to a byte array, regardless of the Position property. You can create a new stream based on the stream you wrote in.

public System.IO.Stream CreateStream(string value)
{
    var baseStream = new System.IO.MemoryStream();
    var baseCopy = new System.IO.MemoryStream();
    using (var writer = new System.IO.StreamWriter(baseStream, System.Text.Encoding.UTF8))
    {
        writer.Write(value);
        writer.Flush();
        baseStream.WriteTo(baseCopy); 
    }
    var returnStream = new System.IO.MemoryStream( baseCopy.ToArray());
    return returnStream;
}
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You need to create a descendant of the StreamWriter and override its dispose method, by always passing false to the disposing parameter, it will force the stream writer NOT to close, the StreamWriter just calls dispose in the close method, so there is no need to override it (of course you can add all the constructors if you want, i just have one):

public class NoCloseStreamWriter : StreamWriter
{
    public NoCloseStreamWriter(Stream stream, Encoding encoding)
        : base(stream, encoding)
    {
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        base.Dispose(false);
    }
}
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1  
I believe this does not do what you think it does. The disposing flag is part of the IDisposable pattern. Always passing false to the Dispose(bool) method of the base class basically signals to the StreamWriter that it is being called from the finalizer (which is not so when you call Dispose() explicitly), and should thus not access any managed objects. This is why it won't dispose the base stream. However, the way you've achieved this is a hack; it would be much simpler to simply not call Dispose in the first place! –  stakx Aug 11 '12 at 14:59
    
Thats Symantec's really, anything you do apart from rewriting the streaming entirely from scratch is going to be a hack. Definitely though, you could simply not call base.Dispose(false) at all, but there would be no functional difference, and I like the clarity of my example. However, keep this in mind, a future version of the StreamWriter class may do more than just close the stream when it disposes, so calling dispose(false) future proofs it as well. But to each his own. –  Aaron Murgatroyd Aug 12 '12 at 11:59
1  
Another way to do it would be to create your own stream wrapper which contains another stream where the Close method simply does nothing instead of closing the underlying stream, this is less of a hack but is a more work. –  Aaron Murgatroyd Aug 12 '12 at 12:03
    
Amazing timing: I was just about to suggest the same thing (decorator class, possibly named OwnedStream, that ignores Dispose(bool) and Close). –  stakx Aug 12 '12 at 12:04
    
Yeah, the code above is how I do it for a quick and dirty method, but if I was making a commercial application or something that actually mattered to me I would do it correctly using the Stream wrapper class. Personally I think Microsoft made a mistake here, the streamwriter should have had a boolean property to close the underlying stream instead, but then I dont work at Microsoft so they do what they like I guess :D –  Aaron Murgatroyd Aug 12 '12 at 12:16
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Simply don't call Dispose on the StreamWriter. The reason this class is disposable is not because it holds unmanaged resource but to allow the disposal of the stream which itself could hold unmanaged resources. If the life of the underlying stream is handled elsewhere, no need to dispose the writer.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course, there is then an implementation detail: does it buffer any data? Personally I'd rather use NonClosingStreamWrapper from MiscUtil –  Marc Gravell Apr 19 '10 at 11:23
2  
@Marc, wouldn't calling Flush do the job in case it buffers data? –  Darin Dimitrov Apr 19 '10 at 11:26
3  
Fine, but once we exit CreateStream, the StreamWrtier is collectable, forcing the third part reader to race against the GC, which is not a situation I want to be left in. Or am I missing something? –  Binary Worrier Apr 19 '10 at 11:33
5  
@BinaryWorrier: No, there's no race condition: StreamWriter doesn't have a finalizer (and indeed shouldn't). –  Jon Skeet Apr 19 '10 at 12:15
4  
@Binary Worrier: You should only have a finalizer if you directly own the resource. In this case, the StreamWriter should assume that the Stream will clean itself up if it needs to. –  Jon Skeet Apr 19 '10 at 14:34
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