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After creating a table (by migration), I want to insert some entries directly. How must I write a migration for this?

thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's an example from ruby on rails api:

 class AddSystemSettings < ActiveRecord::Migration
    # create the table
    def self.up
      create_table :system_settings do |t|
        t.string  :name
        t.string  :label
        t.text  :value
        t.string  :type
        t.integer  :position
      end

      # populate the table
      SystemSetting.create :name => "notice", :label => "Use notice?", :value => 1
    end

    def self.down
      drop_table :system_settings
    end
  end
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2  
Using a model is bad practice since models change over time, per the response below - use SQL –  Dean Radcliffe Dec 3 '13 at 17:22
    
As mentioned by others, that is not the right approach. See this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/2667747/7852 –  givanse Dec 5 '13 at 16:34

Edit: PLEASE NOTE - Posters above are correct, you should not populate the DB inside migrations. Don't use this to add new data, only to modify data as part of changing the schema.

For many things, using raw SQL will be preferable, but if you need to insert data as part of a migration (for instance, doing data conversion when breaking out a table into multiple tables), and you want some default AR stuff like convenient DB-independent escaping, you can define a local version of the model class:

class MyMigrationSucksALittle < ActiveRecord::Migration
  class MyModel < ActiveRecord::Base
    # empty guard class, guaranteed to have basic AR behavior
  end

  ### My Migration Stuff Here
  ### ...

end

Note that this works best for simple cases; since the new class is in a different namespace (MyMigrationSucksALittle::MyModel), polymorphic associations declared in the guard model won't work correctly.

A somewhat more detailed overview of available options is located here: http://railsguides.net/2014/01/30/change-data-in-migrations-like-a-boss/

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Use can use seed data, it's a great way for this ! http://railscasts.com/episodes/179-seed-data

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Don't. If you're looking for seed data, you should use db/seeds.rb and rake db:seed instead. More info in this Railscast or this ASCIIcast.

But, if you must insert or modify data inside a migration, it's best to use SQL statements instead. Your model class isn't guaranteed to still be around in the same form in a future version of your application, and running the migrations from scratch in the future might yield errors if you reference the model class directly.

execute "insert into system_settings (name, label, value) values ('notice', 'Use notice?', 1)"
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Exactly what I was writing. The written out version of the Railscast is here: asciicasts.com/episodes/179-seed-data –  Benjamin Oakes Apr 19 '10 at 13:35
3  
You are so unbelievably right it is ridiculous. I just completely screwed up big time thinking it was fine to write migrations that seed your tables. Terrible. Terrible. Terrible. If you don't trust this answer, trust me when I say "your Models WILL and DO change as time progresses as you update your code". When this DOES occur, your seeding migrations are botched and you LOSE DATA....(luckily I back things up). Now I just have to figure out how to put my data back in automagically after-the-fact. –  Mike.MKrallaProductions Sep 11 '13 at 3:42
1  
There are advantages to locating your data with the migration that creates its table. Maybe the table is meaningless when empty. Maybe you want to extend rails' db versioning to data. Maybe you think using only one file for all seed/configuration data is loco (it is!). You don't need to be dogmatic about saying "NEVER" add data in migrations, if your only reason is that doing it via models is bad. I only say this because this is a high-volume question, and knowing how to do it well is what the poster asked. –  Dean Radcliffe Dec 3 '13 at 17:21
    
I understand the reasoning behind this but it seems to me like there may be legitimate reasons to add/update data. For instance, I have a migration that creates a new model relates it to an pre-existing model. I want to insert a new instance of the new model for every instance of that existing model. Wouldn't it make sense to create the table and insert the initial data for that table in the same place? I'm not seeding the whole database, just this one table. –  Jeff Mar 10 at 21:19

create a new migration file like 047_add_rows_in_system_settings.rb

 class AddRowsInAddSystemSettings < ActiveRecord::Migration
        def self.up
          SystemSetting.create{:name => "name1", :label => "Use notice?", :value => 1}
          SystemSetting.create{:name => "name2", :label => "Use notice?", :value => 2}
         end

        def self.down
          SystemSetting.delete_all
        end
      end

OR

while creating table

046_system_settings.rb

class AddSystemSettings < ActiveRecord::Migration
    def self.up
      create_table :system_settings do |t|
        t.string  :name
        t.string  :label
        t.text  :value
        t.string  :type
        t.integer  :position
      end

      SystemSetting.create :name => "notice", :label => "Use notice?", :value => 1
    end

    def self.down
      drop_table :system_settings
    end
  end

Ref:- http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/Migration.html

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I like this approach but am wondering if this is really a best practice? The user above suggests that it is not. –  Tronathan Feb 4 '13 at 18:34
1  
I won't down vote but it IS bad practice, as you stated, @Tronathan. Read my comment above and don't make the same mistake I did. –  Mike.MKrallaProductions Sep 11 '13 at 3:46

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