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everyone. Here is a small VBA (Excel) function that i wrote, full of MsgBoxes for debugging.

I am passing in the numbers 10 and 1 as arguments, and getting an overflow error when the program reaches the top of the For loop, before it begins the first iteration.

Any thoughts are appreciated.

Declare Sub Sleep Lib "kernel32" (ByVal dwMilliseconds As Long)

Function PerformanceTest(iterations As Integer, interval As Integer) As Double
    Dim st, tot, k As Double
    Dim n As Integer
    tot = 0#
    MsgBox "ok"
    k = iterations + tot
    MsgBox "ookk"
    n = 1
    MsgBox "assigned"
    For n = 1 To iterations
        MsgBox n
        st = Timer
        Application.Calculate
        tot = tot + (Timer - st)
        Sleep (1000 * interval)
    Next n
    'MsgBox (tot / k)
    PerformancTest = tot / k
End Function
share|improve this question
    
Like others, I can't make "overflow" show up. I agree with Tomalak that could point to a problem outside the function. But if your code stalls at the point you say, then Tomalak's idea is hard to accept. –  Smandoli Apr 19 '10 at 20:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Redundancy removed, the essentially unchanged function runs without error in my Excel 2003

Function PerformanceTest(iterations As Integer, interval As Integer) As Double
  Dim st, tot As Double
  Dim n As Integer

  For n = 1 To iterations
    st = Timer
    Application.Calculate
    tot = tot + Timer - st
    ''# Sleep (1000 * interval)
  Next n

  PerformanceTest = tot / (iterations + tot)
End Function

So… the error you see is probably not within the function itself.

P.S.: Pro tip: ;-) Use Debug.Print instead of MsgBox for debug output.

share|improve this answer
    
Same for me.. :o) –  CResults Apr 19 '10 at 17:03
    
@mcoolbeth: Can you let us know what the error was, ultimately? –  Tomalak Apr 19 '10 at 20:07
2  
General comments: I always use Long rather than Integer because its faster. Dim St, tot as double ' St has been dimmed as a Variant for a set of accurate timers for the different flavours of Excel Calculation see: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa730921.aspx –  Charles Williams Apr 20 '10 at 7:04
    
@Charles: I've taken Integer because the OP did. You are absolutely right about the type of st. –  Tomalak Apr 20 '10 at 7:14

Change

Dim n As Integer 

to

Dim n As Long
share|improve this answer
    
But doesn't the number 10 fit nicely into the range of values that can be represented by objects of type Integer? –  mcoolbeth Apr 19 '10 at 16:59
    
Also, following this suggestion does not alter the behaviour of the program. –  mcoolbeth Apr 19 '10 at 17:00
    
The program works fine for me as-is. Integer should not be a problem. –  BenV Apr 19 '10 at 17:04
    
Sorry guys. We'll leave my answer up for people to learn from. (Like, read the question more carefully.) :-) –  Smandoli Apr 19 '10 at 20:02

At the risk of looking like a fool again, here's some input.

I would build my timer function like this. It seems simpler to me. (Not counting that I deleted some unessential lines -- I mean it's structurally simple.)

And if it ran without overflow, well that would be a nice plus.

Function PerformanceTest(iterations As Integer, interval As Integer) As Double

Dim st, tot, k As Double
Dim n As Integer

PerformanceTest = Timer
k = iterations + tot
n = 1

For n = 1 To iterations
    '' insert operation that takes time
    Sleep (1000 * interval)
Next n

PerformanceTest = Timer - PerformanceTest
PerformanceTest = PerformanceTest / k
End Function
share|improve this answer

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