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How to customize the order of execution of tests in testng ?

For example:

@Test
public class Test1 {
  @Test
  public void test1() {
      System.out.println("test1");
  }

  @Test
  public void test2() {
      System.out.println("test2");
  }

  @Test
  public void test3() {
      System.out.println("test3");
  }
}

In the above suite, the order of execution of tests is arbitrary. i.e., sthe output is: test1 test3 test2

How do I execute the tests in the order in which they've been written?

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5  
It would help if you gave us a hint as to what kind of testing you were talking about. –  Syntactic Apr 19 '10 at 17:41
    
Please be more specific; at least with tags!!! –  Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy Apr 19 '10 at 17:41
    
Tests like unit tests? What for? Tests HAVE to be independant, otherwise.... you can not run a test individually. If they are independent, why even interfere? Plus - what is an "order" if you run them in multiple threads on multiple cores? –  TomTom Apr 19 '10 at 17:48
    
I think he's talking about a unit test framework called testng: testng.org - I've added a tag to help clarify this. –  Paul R Apr 19 '10 at 17:57
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11 Answers

In TestNG, you use dependsOnMethods and/or dependsOnGroups:

@Test(groups = "a")
public void f1() {}

@Test(groups = "a")
public void f2() {}

@Test(dependsOnGroups = "a")
public void g() {}

In this case, g() will only run after f1() and f2() have completed and succeeded.

You will find a lot of examples in the documentation: http://testng.org

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This will work

@Test(priority=1)
public void Test1() {

}

@Test(priority=2)
public void Test2() {

}

@Test(priority=3)
public void Test3() {

}
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+1 for a solution which will let the suite of tests run even if one fails. –  kyoob Jun 13 at 19:03
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If I understand your question correctly in that you want to run tests in a specified order, TestNG IMethodInterceptor can be used. Take a look at http://beust.com/weblog2/archives/000479.html on how to leverage them.

If you want run some preinitialization, take a look at IHookable http://testng.org/javadoc/org/testng/IHookable.html and associated thread http://groups.google.com/group/testng-users/browse_thread/thread/42596505990e8484/3923db2f127a9a9c?lnk=gst&q=IHookable#3923db2f127a9a9c

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To address specific scenario in question:

@Test
public void Test1() {

}

@Test (dependsOnMethods={"Test1"})
public void Test2() {

}

@Test (dependsOnMethods={"Test2"})
public void Test3() {

}
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By using priority paramenter for @Test we can control the order of test execution.

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2  
Unfortunately not in TestNG. –  Secator Apr 11 '13 at 11:38
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@Test(dependsOnMethods="someBloodyMethod")
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I might point out this isn't a particularly helpful answer - I suggest expanding on your answers in a little more detail! –  Emrakul Apr 22 '13 at 21:21
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However, Cedric's solution has some drawbacks when working with the TestNG Eclipse Plugin, ver. 5.9.0.4 as it befeore every run of the TestCase shows message that groups are not suppoerted by this plugin.

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There are ways of executing tests in a given order. Normally though, tests have to be repeatable and independent to guarantee it is testing only the desired functionality and is not dependent on side effects of code outside of what is being tested.

So, to answer your question, you'll need to provide more information such as WHY it is important to run tests in a specific order.

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11  
There are many situations where dependencies are useful, especially for integration and functional testing. For example, testing a web site: you want to test the login page first, and then the next page, etc... Clearing and recreating the state from scratch all the time is impractical and leads to very slow tests. Also, dependencies give you much better diagnostics, such as "1 test failed, 99 tests skipped" instead of the traditional "100 tests failed" which doesn't help realize that all these failures are actually because one test failed. –  Cedric Beust Apr 19 '10 at 18:40
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If you are using Junit, you can use @Before & @After annotations, this is the only way to order your methods, but it doesn't expect to fail on them or even test any method.

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Piggy backing off of user1927494's answer, In case you want to run a single test before all others, you can do this:

@Test()
public void testOrderDoesntMatter_1() {
}

@Test(priority=-1)
public void testToRunFirst() {
}

@Test()
public void testOrderDoesntMatter_2() {
}
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Tests like unit tests? What for? Tests HAVE to be independant, otherwise.... you can not run a test individually. If they are independent, why even interfere? Plus - what is an "order" if you run them in multiple threads on multiple cores?

share|improve this answer
2  
It's actually quite possible to mix dependencies and parallelism, take a look at this article to find out how TestNG does it: beust.com/weblog/2009/11/28/hard-core-multicore-with-testng –  Cedric Beust Apr 19 '10 at 18:41
    
People use JUnit for lots of things besides Unit tests. Almost all of those additional uses have times when you need to do things in a particular order. This is one of the major rationales for developing TestNG, BTW. –  Jeffiekins Jan 30 at 17:14
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