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This very simple code gives me tons of errors:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main() {
    std::string test = " ";
    std::cout << test;
}

I tried to compile it on linux by typing gcc -o simpletest simpletest.cpp on the console. I can't see why it isn't working. What is happening?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Try using 'g++' instead of 'gcc'.

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And add return 0; as rmeador pointed out. –  grieve Nov 5 '08 at 22:51
    
that was it. such a silly mistake! thanks –  David McDavidson Nov 5 '08 at 22:55
3  
actually, c++ has a special concession that allows main to not have a return statement even with it declared returning an int. in which case it will implicitly return the proper success value, usually 0. –  Evan Teran Nov 5 '08 at 22:56
    
@Evan: I didn't realize that. I'll have to test out my various C++ compilers and see which ones actually implement that feature. –  grieve Nov 5 '08 at 23:00
1  
A function declared to return a value (say, int) but that does not actually have a return statement will compile, should cause a warning but not an error, and will return garbage values when run. I believe the "special concession" is to have main() return a sensible 0 instead of garbage. –  Max Lybbert Nov 5 '08 at 23:48

To add to what others have said: g++ is the GNU C++ compiler. gcc is the GNU compiler collection (not the GNU C compiler, as many people assume). gcc serves as a frontend for g++ when compiling C++ sources. gcc can compile C, C++, Objective-C, Fortran, Ada, assembly, and others.

The reason why it fails trying to compile with gcc is that you need to link in the C++ standard library. By default, g++ does this, but gcc does not. To link in the C++ standard library using gcc, use the following:

gcc -o simpletest simpletest.cpp -lstdc++
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That solves link errors but the original poster complained about compile errors ; –  Windows programmer Nov 5 '08 at 23:26
    
The original poster didn't specify whether he's getting compiler or linker errors, but if you compile that code yourself using gcc you'll get linker errors. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 6 '08 at 0:08

Try:

g++ -o simpletest simpletest.cpp
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that's right, it worked, thanks! –  David McDavidson Nov 5 '08 at 22:57

Try with g++ -o simpletest simpletest.cpp. gcc is the C compiler, while g++ is the C++ compiler which also links in the required C++ libraries.

Additionally, you will have to add a return 0; at the end of your main() function.

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actually, c++ has a special concession that allows main to not have a return statement even with it declared returning an int. in which case it will implicitly return the proper success value, usually 0. –  Evan Teran Nov 5 '08 at 22:55
    
gcc is actually the GNU compiler collection; you can still compile C++ code with gcc, but you must explicitly link in the C++ standard library with the -lstdc++ option. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 5 '08 at 23:05
    
C99 also has the same awful concession to abysmal coding practices (that is, you can omit a return from the end of main() and it is equivalent to a return(0); at the end of main()). –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 6 '08 at 0:03

if your compiler is picky you may want to add that all important return 0; at the end there

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Not necessary in standard C++ -- nor in C99. That said, I'd add the explicit return; the implicit return is pretty nasty. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 6 '08 at 7:46

You declared your main() as returning an int yet you have no return statement. Add return 0; and see if that helps. If that doesn't solve your problem, try editing your post to include some representative lines from those errors your getting and maybe we can help you better.

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the problem was that i was using the wrong compiler... silly me although i can see that the missing return statement, even if it didn't throw any warnings or errors, must be bad practice. Thanks –  David McDavidson Nov 5 '08 at 22:54
    
actually, c++ has a special concession that allows main to not have a return statement even with it declared returning an int. in which case it will implicitly return the proper success value, usually 0. –  Evan Teran Nov 5 '08 at 22:54
    
@Evan: interesting... I used to declare my main() to be void so I don't have to return something, when I used compilers that supported it. G++ doesn't like that though, so I have to make it be int and return 0. –  rmeador Nov 5 '08 at 23:14
    
It was always wrong to declare main() to be void, unless you intentionally rely an a particular implementation's extensions. –  Windows programmer Nov 5 '08 at 23:28

g++ was the right answer for me too, I voted it up, thanks.

But my code, a little ditty that I've been using since Feb 13, 1998 (first comment), to calculate effective gross pay and withholding for our kid's nanny, was far TOO simple even for g++. In terms of the example above, my Stroustrup-second-edition-compliant dinosaur went:

// too simple!

#include <iostream.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

main() {
    cout << "Hello World!" << endl;
}

This will give you a full terminal window of error messages. Everything except the curly braces is an error! AND its missing a return line. Time was, this would compile and run correctly in commercial C++ development environments...

Kicking it new-school, I'm now using: // just simple enough

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[] ) {
    std::cout << "Hello World!" << std::endl;
//  TODO - this ought to return success, 0
}

The original questioner had the std::cout and used string from

 <string>...  

"simple" is a relative term...

Bill

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