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foreach(var someDisposableObject in listOfDisposableObjects)
{
    //some code
    someDisposableObject.Dispose(); //current code contains something like this.
}

Is there safe way, like a using clause to use in this scenario?

For my second iteration (before getting responses) I changed the code to

foreach(var someDisposableObject in listOfDisposableObjects)
{
    try
    {
        //some code
    }
    finally
    {
        someDisposableObject.Dispose(); //current code contains something like this.
    }
}

though

foreach(var someDisposableObject in listOfDisposableObjects)
{
    using( someDisposableObject )
    {
        //some code
    }
}

is much more tidy and most likely safer.

share|improve this question
    
When and where are the objects created? –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 19 '10 at 20:47
    
Jeffrey, the scenario is looping through sub-webs in SharePoint, so they're created outside my code. Sharepoint is a little funny about when you should dispose and there is a lot of code that doesn't safely dispose out there. –  Greg Ogle Apr 20 '10 at 18:20
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3 Answers

I would say your Dispose code should be outside of this foreach.

The key point you haven't addressed in your sample is how the list of disposable objects is generated. What happens if an exception is thrown while you are generating the list of disposable objects? You will want to dispose those that you have created so far.

Ideally you want a container that implements IDisposable to hold your disposable objects. If your disposable objects implement IComponent, then System.ComponentModel.Container is what you need. If not, you may have to roll your own.

Code might look something like:

using(Container container = new Container())
{
    // Generate list and add each element to the container
    for (...)
    {
        someDisposableComponent = ...;
        container.Add(someDisposableComponent);
        listOfDisposableObjects.Add(someDisposableComponent);
    }

    ... 

    foreach(var someDisposableObject in listOfDisposableObjects)
    {
        ... some code ...
    }
}

I suggest you post code that generates the list if you need more help.

share|improve this answer
add comment
    foreach(var someDisposableObject in listOfDisposableObjects)
    {
        using (someDisposableObject)
        {
           //some code
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
2  
If //some code throws an error, then any disposable objects in the list after the current one will not be disposed. This code only differs from the OP in that the object currently being processed will be disposed. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 19 '10 at 20:50
    
I just didn't know that was valid/legit/possible. Simple. Thanks. –  Greg Ogle Apr 20 '10 at 18:18
1  
I agree with Jeffrey. This answer is seriously flawed and should not be the accepted answer. –  David Walschots Apr 20 '10 at 18:49
    
@JeffreyLWhitledge can you please explain why? I would have interpreted the code as a try { //some code } finally { if (someDisposableObject != null) (IDisposable)someDisposableObject.Dispose(); } If //some code throws an exception, it will dispose this object, and the foreach will pass the exception up rather than enumerate the next item –  M Afifi Jun 14 '12 at 11:51
    
@MAfifi—The problem is that every object in the collection needs to be disposed. Before the foreach loop even begins, we have a collection of objects, and every object in that collection needs to be disposed, whether //some code completes or not for any of the previous objects. This is different from the normal case, in which the object is created inside the parenthesized portion of the using statement. If //some code throws an exception, then the foreach loop may be terminated before every object in the collection has its chance to be supplied to the using statement. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Jun 14 '12 at 13:48
show 3 more comments

I think this may be your best bet:

try
{
    foreach(var someDisposableObject in listOfDisposableObjects) 
    { 
        //some code 
    } 
}
finally
{
    foreach(var someDisposableObject in listOfDisposableObjects) 
    { 
        someDisposableObject.Dispose();
    } 
}

EDITED TO ADD:

If you absolutely have to dispose of every object no matter what, then you can do this:

    private static void DoStuff(IEnumerable<IDisposable> listOfDisposableObjects)
    {
        using (var enumerator = listOfDisposableObjects.GetEnumerator())
        {
            if (enumerator.MoveNext())
                DoStuffCore(enumerator);
        }
    }

    private static void DoStuffCore(IEnumerator<IDisposable> enumerator)
    {
        using (var someDisposableObject = enumerator.Current)
        {
            if (enumerator.MoveNext())
                DoStuffCore(enumerator);

            // Do stuff with someDisposableObject                
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This could fail in the finally block. –  Greg Ogle Apr 20 '10 at 18:23
    
Sure it could. If you're concerned that the Dispose method itself could throw, then you'll have to do something else. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 20 '10 at 20:15
1  
@Greg Ogle - OK, I added a solution that will always dispose of the objects. (Unless there's a catastrophic error, of course. I can't stop a power failure!) –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 20 '10 at 20:25
    
+1 Great trick. –  SLaks Apr 20 '10 at 20:50
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