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Okay, I have the following PHP code to extract an email address of the following two forms:

Random Stranger <email@domain.com>
email@domain.com

Here is the PHP code:

// The first example
$sender = "Random Stranger <email@domain.com>";

$pattern = '/([\w_-]*@[\w-\.]*)|.*<([\w_-]*@[\w-\.]*)>/';

preg_match($pattern,$sender,$matches,PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE);

echo "<pre>";
print_r($matches);
echo "</pre><hr>";

// The second example
$sender = "user@domain.com";

preg_match($pattern,$sender,$matches,PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE);

echo "<pre>";
print_r($matches);
echo "</pre>";

My question is... what is in $matches? It seems to be a strange collection of arrays. Which index holds the match from the parenthesis? How can I be sure I'm getting the email address and only the email address?

Update:

Here is the output:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => Random Stranger 
            [1] => 0
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 
            [1] => -1
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => user@domain.com
            [1] => 5
        )

)
Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => user@domain.com
            [1] => 0
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => user@domain.com
            [1] => 0
        )

)
share|improve this question
    
I know jack shit about regex, but wouldn't $matches be an array of groups of expressions, i.e. whatever is encased by the parenthesis? –  Anthony Forloney Apr 19 '10 at 21:17
    
Ya, but there are three items in the array (for the first test). The contents are bizzare. Maybe I should edit the question to include them. (the output) –  Nathan Osman Apr 19 '10 at 21:18
    
Yeah that sounds like a good idea, I am intrigued and I don't have a PHP IDE at work to test it out with. :/ –  Anthony Forloney Apr 19 '10 at 21:19
    
are those the only 2 options? name <email> or just email? i'm asking becasue its better to avoid regexes if you can. –  Galen Apr 19 '10 at 21:22
    
@Galen: Ya, those are the only two options. I'm using the RFC 2822 standard. –  Nathan Osman Apr 19 '10 at 21:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This doesn't help you with your preg question but it will simplify your code. Since those are the only 2 options, dont use regular expressions

echo end( explode( '<', rtrim( $sender, '>' ) ) );
share|improve this answer
    
That works for user@domain.com but not Random Stranger <user@domain.com>. –  Nathan Osman Apr 19 '10 at 21:33
    
sure it does, are you using some ancient version of php or something? –  Galen Apr 19 '10 at 21:35
    
Never mind, it works. Thanks! This is much cleaner than RegEx. –  Nathan Osman Apr 19 '10 at 21:37
    
i haven't read the standard but im assuming that < isn't a valid character for emails. so this should work for everything. –  Galen Apr 19 '10 at 21:42

The following is copied directly from the help doc at http://us.php.net/preg_match

If matches is provided, then it is filled with the results of search. $matches[0] will contain the text that matched the full pattern, $matches[1] will have the text that matched the first captured parenthesized subpattern, and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
I added the output above. How come the first array has 3 items and the second has 2? They should both have the same number of parenthesis, shouldn't they? –  Nathan Osman Apr 19 '10 at 21:21

The preg_match() manual page explains how $matches works. It's an optional parameter that gets filled with the results of any bracketed sub-expression from your regexp, in the order that they matched. $matches[0] is always the entire expression match, followed by the sub-expressions.

So for example, that pattern contains two sub-expression, ([\w_-]*@[\w-\.]*) and ([\w_-]*@[\w-\.]*). The parts matching those two expressions will be put into $matches[1] and $matches[2], respectively. I would guess after a quick glance that for the email address of Random Stranger <email@domain.com>, you would have something like this in $matches:

Array( 
    0 => "Random Stranger <email@domain.com>",
    1 => "Random Stranger",
    2 => "email@domain.com"
)

Think of it as passing an array named $matches by reference, that gets filled with all the sub-parts that are matched.

Edit - note that you are using the PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE flag, which alters the behaviour of how $matches gets filled, so your result won't match my example. The manual explains how this flag alters the capture as well. In this case, instead of a set of matched sub-expressions, you get a multidimensional array of each expression with the position it was found at in the string.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid that's not the output I get. See my update to the question. –  Nathan Osman Apr 19 '10 at 21:25
    
Ah. That was it! The PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE flag was messing me up. Still, how come the arrays are different sizes? The first one has 3 items, and the second has 2... –  Nathan Osman Apr 19 '10 at 21:28
    
Yeah, I edited my answer to make room for the fact that you're using the PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE flag, which changes what you get in $matches. –  zombat Apr 19 '10 at 21:28
1  
I'm going to guess it has something to do with the or in the middle of the expression. If the user@domain.com style of address matches, the second half of the regexp likely doesn't get evaluated. For an address with a name in front of the address, the second half is the part that matches, but the first half of the regexp gets evaluated as well (it just matches nothing, so you get an empty array element). –  zombat Apr 19 '10 at 21:32
    
@zombat: What would be the proper way of doing this then? –  Nathan Osman Apr 19 '10 at 21:35

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