Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is mysql_real_escape_string supposed to replace both addslashes() and stripslashes()??

ie.. do I use it to encode form input variables on MySQL inserts as well as use it in place of stripslashes on MySQL select statements?

Sincerely, Confused PHP noob

share|improve this question
2  
People are trying to help you. –  Finbarr Apr 19 '10 at 23:12
    
thanks, I really want to use mysql_real_escape_string not this PDO thing. –  confusedphpnoob Apr 19 '10 at 23:15
    
There is not normally any need to use stripslashes() - or at least, if there is, something is doing something at the wrong "layer". –  MarkR Apr 20 '10 at 5:48
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you are using the regular MySQL driver module for PHP, then yes, mysql_real_escape_string() is the way to go. You can ignore addslashes() and stripslashes() entirely, in fact.

Your query creation will look something like this:

$sql = "INSERT INTO tbl (x) VALUES '".mysql_real_escape_string($x)."'";

mysql_real_escape_string() should be used on any user input that is going into your query. Note that you don't want to escape your data any other way before inserting it. You shouldn't use addslashes() or htmlentities(), which are common mistakes when storing HTML fragments in a database. You should not need to unescape your data in any way after you have retrieved it.

As other posters mention, there are other MySQL database driver modules for PHP, including PDO and MySQLi. Both offer a feature known as prepared statements, which is an alternative method of creating queries that handles escaping for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but do I use it when retrieving on SELECT statements as well? –  confusedphpnoob Apr 19 '10 at 23:14
    
Yes - generally any data that you put into any query should be escaped, unless you know for sure it's clean. –  zombat Apr 19 '10 at 23:17
    
money. All I need to know! Thanks yall. I will learn PDO one day.. today is not that day. –  confusedphpnoob Apr 19 '10 at 23:18
add comment

I recommend using PDO and prepared statements instead; see the PDOStatement class. Prepared statements can be more efficient (if the engine doesn't have to reparse your SQL). They should also prevent you from accidentally storing escaped data in the db (double-escaping). Using PDO will make it easier to add support for other databases.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to use PDO, I want to use MySQL only. –  confusedphpnoob Apr 19 '10 at 23:08
    
You can use PDO even if you require MySQL-specific features. You don't have to support multiple databases. It's still a better library than mysql_connect and friends. –  Matthew Flaschen Apr 19 '10 at 23:09
2  
@confusedphpnoob That's the wrong attitude to have if you ever hope to become even a decent programmer - let alone a good one. –  Daniel Bingham Apr 19 '10 at 23:13
1  
@confusedphpnoob - it's a side effect of any question about mysql_real_escape_string(). Invariably, most of the answers in the thread won't address the question, and instead recommend something else. Don't take it personally ;) –  zombat Apr 19 '10 at 23:15
    
Thanks - I just want the answer to the mysql_real_escape_string. PDO is probably a million times better but I don't care about it right now. –  confusedphpnoob Apr 19 '10 at 23:16
add comment

Yes, it should do all the backslashing for you (based upon whatever charset the mysql server is)

share|improve this answer
    
no problem. make sure to mark one of the responses as the answer –  Mitch Dempsey Apr 19 '10 at 23:13
add comment

Yes, it should escape strings in preparation for use in MySQL. However, it is not the be-all, end-all of avoiding SQL injection. It does in fact leave you very vulnerable to it still.

Better to use the PHP PDO instead, parameterized queries are the way to go ;)

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'd recommend using prepared statements. That way you won't have the hassle of manually escaping every query.

$stmt = $db->prepare("SELECT stuff FROM table WHERE something = ?");
$stmt->execute('s', 'something'); // s means string

Another option is to use PDO, which is an even better version of this, and generally database independent.

share|improve this answer
2  
Wrong answer? Seriously, I DONT WANT THIS PDO NONSENSE. –  confusedphpnoob Apr 19 '10 at 23:09
1  
@confusedphpnoob Let me put it to you this way. There is a fair probability that the mysql_* family of functions will be depreciated in the future. They are outdated. They aren't as secure, efficient or well written as the PDO. The PDO is the "correct" way to handle a database connection in PHP 5 and above. If you don't want your code to break and stop working in the future, learn to use the PDO. –  Daniel Bingham Apr 19 '10 at 23:15
1  
Ok thank you. Sorry for being a dick. Everywhere I look people answer this question the same way... Just want the answer to this particular question and not a better solution. –  confusedphpnoob Apr 19 '10 at 23:18
    
I know the feeling, I've had a similar experience many times on SO. What I've learned is that, even if the answer I'm getting isn't the one I was looking for it's usually the best answer. Usually ;) –  Daniel Bingham Apr 19 '10 at 23:20
add comment

http://php.net/manual/en/function.mysql-real-escape-string.php

You wouldn't want to use addslashes() and stripslashes(). If I recall correctly, mysql_real_escape_string() is more similiar to addslashes(), but it escapes different characters.

share|improve this answer
1  
addslashes on input, stripslashes on output, right? –  confusedphpnoob Apr 19 '10 at 23:09
    
Yup. (I think). Just look it up in the PHP manual. =P. –  Andrew Apr 20 '10 at 0:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.