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I've been reading about OOP in C but I never liked how you can't have private data members like you can in C++. But then it came to my mind that you could create 2 structures. One is defined in the header file and the other is defined in the source file.

// =========================================
// in somestruct.h
typedef struct {
  int _public_member;
} SomeStruct;

// =========================================
// in somestruct.c

#include "somestruct.h"

typedef struct {
  int _public_member;
  int _private_member;
} SomeStructSource;

SomeStruct *SomeStruct_Create()
{
  SomeStructSource *p = (SomeStructSource *)malloc(sizeof(SomeStructSource));
  p->_private_member = 42;
  return (SomeStruct *)p;
}

From here you can just cast one structure to the other. Is this considered bad practice? Or is it done often?

share|improve this question
1  
Why make it so complicated - If the tool does not do what you need use a different one. – Romain Hippeau Apr 20 '10 at 1:45
    
I think this would violate the object aliasing rules, at least in C99. I know it would in C++. – James McNellis Apr 20 '10 at 1:46
17  
It would be terrible to close this! Why are people voting close on such a valid question? Because the forget how to do things in C? – Heath Hunnicutt Apr 20 '10 at 1:47
6  
This is why I wish you could vote against close votes. This is an excellent question. – caf Apr 20 '10 at 2:04
3  
Want to add my voice to the protests: "Not a real question" is a particularly terrible reason to close this. This might be a duplicate. That's the only reason I can imagine this being closed. – Chris Lutz Apr 20 '10 at 2:16

13 Answers 13

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Personally, I'd more like this:

typedef struct {
  int _public_member;
  /*I know you wont listen, but don't ever touch this member.*/
  int _private_member;
} SomeStructSource;

It's C after all, if people want to screw up, they should be allowed to - no need to hide stuff, except:

If what you need is to keep the ABI/API compatible, there's 2 approaches that's more common from what I've seen.

  • Don't give your clients access to the struct, give them an opaque handle (a void* with a pretty name), provide init/destroy and accessor functions for everything. This makes sure you can change the structure without even recompiling the clients if you're writing a library.

  • provide an opaque handle as part of your struct, which you can allocate however you like. This approach is even used in C++ to provide ABI compatibility.

e.g

 struct SomeStruct {
  int member;
  void* internals; //allocate this to your private struct
 };
share|improve this answer
    
I find a really bad design allowing the client to access any member of a struct. The whole struct should be private. Access to it's members should be done through getters and setters. – Felipe Lavratti Apr 19 '13 at 12:42
2  
@fanl doing so in C has a lot of implications, e.g. to hide a struct in that way, it becomes quite hard to allocate it on the stack, or inline as a member of another struct. The easy way out of that is to dynamically allocate the struct and only expose a void* or handle, and while doing so may be ok in some cases, there's many cases where the implications are too big and it will inhibit you from taking advantage of what C provides you. – nos Apr 19 '13 at 14:20
    
IMHO the second example given here should be the answer, just remember to provide a destructor function. – Luis Oct 3 '14 at 14:38
    
In performance critical situations, avoid the jump that void * implies and just allocate the private data inline - privacy be damned (in this case prefixing an underscore is all you can do). – Arcane Engineer Aug 11 '15 at 11:42

sizeof(SomeStruct) != sizeof(SomeStructSource). This will cause someone to find you and murder you someday.

share|improve this answer
12  
And any jury would let them go afterwards. – gnud Apr 20 '10 at 9:43
7  
"Always code as if the person who ends up maintaining your code is a violent psychopath who knows where you live." (attributed to Rick Osborne) – Dietrich Epp Nov 2 '11 at 14:10

You almost have it, but haven't gone far enough.

In the header:

struct SomeStruct;
typedef struct SomeStruct *SomeThing;


SomeThing create_some_thing();
destroy_some_thing(SomeThing thing);
int get_public_member_some_thing(SomeThing thing);
void set_public_member_some_thing(SomeThing thing, int value);

In the .c:

struct SomeStruct {
  int public_member;
  int private_member;
};

SomeThing create_some_thing()
{
    SomeThing thing = malloc(sizeof(*thing));
    thing->public_member = 0;
    thing->private_member = 0;
    return thing;
}

... etc ...

The point is, here now consumers have no knowledge of the internals of SomeStruct, and you can change it with impunity, adding and removing members at will, even without consumers needing to recompile. They also can't "accidentally" munge members directly, or allocate SomeStruct on the stack. This of course can also be viewed as a disadvantage.

share|improve this answer
8  
Some consider using typedef to hide pointers to be a bad idea, particularly because it is more obvious that SomeStruct * needs to be freed somehow than SomeThing, which looks like an ordinary stack variable. Indeed, you can still declare struct SomeStruct; and, as long as you don't define it, people will be forced to use SomeStruct * pointers without being able to dereference their members, thus having the same effect while not hiding the pointer. – Chris Lutz Apr 20 '10 at 2:19

Never do that. If your API supports anything that takes SomeStruct as a parameter (which I'm expecting it does) then they could allocate one on a stack and pass it in. You'd get major errors trying to access the private member since the one the compiler allocates for the client class doesn't contain space for it.

The classic way to hide members in a struct is to make it a void*. It's basically a handle/cookie that only your implementation files know about. Pretty much every C library does this for private data.

share|improve this answer

I do not recommend using the public struct pattern. The correct design pattern, for OOP in C, is to provide functions to access every data, never allowing public access to data. The class data should be declared at the source, in order to be private, and be referenced in a forward manner.

/*********** header.h ***********/
typedef struct sModuleData module_t; 
module_t *Module_Create();
void Module_Destroy(module_t *);
/* Only getters and Setters to access data */
void Module_SetSomething(module_t *);
void Module_GetSomething(module_t *);

/*********** source.c ***********/
struct sModuleData {
    /* private data */
};
module_t *Module_Create()
{
    module_t *inst = (module_t *)malloc(sizeof(struct sModuleData));
    /* ... */
    return inst;
}
void Module_Destroy(module_t *inst)
{
    /* ... */
    free(inst);
}

/* Other functions implementation */

To make it short, you should get rid of the public data and provide functions to write and read these data. In a such way the public/private dilemma won't exist any more.

If you do not want to use Malloc/Free, here goes the structure:

/*********** privateTypes.h ***********/
/* All private, non forward, datatypes goes here */
struct sModuleData {
    /* private data */
};

/*********** header.h ***********/
#include "privateTypes.h"
typedef struct sModuleData module_t; 
void Module_Init(module_t *);
void Module_Deinit(module_t *);
/* Only getters and Setters to access data */
void Module_SetSomething(module_t *);
void Module_GetSomething(module_t *);

/*********** source.c ***********/
void Module_Init(module_t *inst)
{       
    /* perform initialization on the instance */        
}
void Module_Deinit(module_t *inst)
{
    /* perform deinitialization on the instance */  
}

/*********** main.c ***********/
int main()
{
    module_t mod_instance;
    module_Init(&mod_instance);
    /* and so on */
}
share|improve this answer
    
One difficulty with that approach is that it requires the use of malloc/free even in situations where it should be possible for the struct to simply be created as a stack variable and then disappear when the method exits. Use of malloc/free for things which should have stacking semantics can lead to memory fragmentation if between the creation/destruction other code needs to create persistent objects. Such problem may be mitigated if one provides a method to use a passed-in block of storage to hold the object, and typedefs an int[] of suitable size for such purpose. – supercat Mar 12 '13 at 16:02
    
@supercat True, if you do no want to use malloc/free in your embedded system make the struct private to the programmer, not to the code. I have edited my answer to deal with it. – Felipe Lavratti Mar 12 '13 at 16:27
1  
That's a reasonable approach. An approach which would enforce the proper usage even more strongly would be to define a typedef int module_store_t[20]; and then have a module_t *Module_CreateIn(module_store_t *p). Code could create an automatic variable of type module_store_t and then use Module_CreateIn to derive from that that a pointer a newly-initialized module whose lifetime would match that of the auto-variable. – supercat Mar 12 '13 at 16:39
    
The second approach does not help in struct encapsulation. Unfortunately, it still allows private struct members to be directly referenced! Please try it in your code. – Adi Apr 19 '13 at 12:19
1  
As much as I like C for its simplicity, it is so annoying when it comes to applying design patterns. C and design patterns simply are not compatible. And it is really frustrating that, after 40 years of C existence, there is no single technique which would allow you to utilize the best practice coding rules in C. If we ignore the stack allocation issue, ADT technique really could be usable but only if there would be an appropriate malloc implementation which would not cause any fragmentation problems. I am really surprised that there are no Standard C Library implementations <to be continued> – Adi Apr 19 '13 at 13:27

Something similar to the method you've proposed is indeed used sometimes (eg. see the different varities of struct sockaddr* in the BSD sockets API), but it's almost impossible to use without violating C99's strict aliasing rules.

You can, however, do it safely:

somestruct.h:

struct SomeStructPrivate; /* Opaque type */

typedef struct {
  int _public_member;
  struct SomeStructPrivate *private;
} SomeStruct;

somestruct.c:

#include "somestruct.h"

struct SomeStructPrivate {
    int _member;
};

SomeStruct *SomeStruct_Create()
{
    SomeStruct *p = malloc(sizeof *p);
    p->private = malloc(sizeof *p->private);
    p->private->_member = 0xWHATEVER;
    return p;
}
share|improve this answer

I'd write a hidden structure, and reference it using a pointer in the public structure. For example, your .h could have:

typedef struct {
    int a, b;
    void *private;
} public_t;

And your .c:

typedef struct {
    int c, d;
} private_t;

It obviously doesn't protect against pointer arithmetic, and adds a bit of overhead for allocation/deallocation, but I guess it's beyond the scope of the question.

share|improve this answer
    
You could just do typedef void private_t there. – user181548 Apr 20 '10 at 2:08
    
@Kinopiko thanks, was definitely a typo. Removed the typedef to avoid type redefinition. – jweyrich Apr 20 '10 at 2:19
    
This sir is in my opinion the ONLY good way how to use private variables. With this OO and C++ is obsolete. Great answer and +1. – rafstraumur Mar 22 '13 at 19:18

There are better ways to do this, like using a void * pointer to a private structure in the public struct. The way you are doing it you're fooling the compiler.

share|improve this answer

This approach is valid, useful, standard C.

A slightly different approach, used by sockets API, which was defined by BSD Unix, is the style used for struct sockaddr.

share|improve this answer

Use the following workaround:

#include <stdio.h>

#define C_PRIVATE(T)        struct T##private {
#define C_PRIVATE_END       } private;

#define C_PRIV(x)           ((x).private)
#define C_PRIV_REF(x)       (&(x)->private)

struct T {
    int a;

C_PRIVATE(T)
    int x;
C_PRIVATE_END
};

int main()
{
    struct T  t;
    struct T *tref = &t;

    t.a = 1;
    C_PRIV(t).x = 2;

    printf("t.a = %d\nt.x = %d\n", t.a, C_PRIV(t).x);

    tref->a = 3;
    C_PRIV_REF(tref)->x = 4;

    printf("tref->a = %d\ntref->x = %d\n", tref->a, C_PRIV_REF(tref)->x);

    return 0;
}

Result is:

t.a = 1
t.x = 2
tref->a = 3
tref->x = 4
share|improve this answer

Not very private, given that the calling code can cast back to a (SomeStructSource *). Also, what happens when you want to add another public member? You'll have to break binary compatibility.

EDIT: I missed that it was in a .c file, but there really is nothing stopping a client from copying it out, or possibly even #includeing the .c file directly.

share|improve this answer
    
This is why SomeStructSource is defined in the source file. – Marlon Apr 20 '10 at 1:45
1  
Only so if you publish SomeStructSource. A C++ object pointer is similar, one could use offsetof() and pointer maths to get to the private members. – Heath Hunnicutt Apr 20 '10 at 1:46

Related, though not exactly hiding.

Is to conditionally deprecate members.

Note that this works for GCC/Clang, but MSVC and other compilers can deprecate too, so its possible to come up with a more portable version.

If you build with fairly strict warnings, or warnings as errors, this at least avoids accidental use.

// =========================================
// in somestruct.h

#ifdef _IS_SOMESTRUCT_C
#  if defined(__GNUC__)
#    define HIDE_MEMBER __attribute__((deprecated))
#  else
#    define HIDE_MEMBER  /* no hiding! */
#  endif
#else
#  define HIDE_MEMBER
#endif

typedef struct {
  int _public_member;
  int _private_member  HIDE_MEMBER;
} SomeStruct;

#undef HIDE_MEMBER


// =========================================
// in somestruct.c
#define _IS_SOMESTRUCT_C
#include "somestruct.h"

SomeStruct *SomeStruct_Create()
{
  SomeStructSource *p = (SomeStructSource *)malloc(sizeof(SomeStructSource));
  p->_private_member = 42;
  return (SomeStruct *)p;
}
share|improve this answer

My solution would be to provide only the prototype of the internal struct and then declare the definition in the .c file. Very useful to show C interface and use C++ behind.

.h :

struct internal;

struct foo {
   int public_field;
   struct internal *_internal;
};

.c :

struct internal {
    int private_field; // could be a C++ class
};

Note: In that case, the variable have to be a pointer because the compiler is unable to know the size of the internal struct.

share|improve this answer
    
I will not vote down, but this does not work unless you use it as a pointer e.g. struct internal *_internal – Nick Mar 12 '15 at 13:13
    
You're right! I missed it ;) Thanks! – adc Mar 24 '15 at 16:09

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