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In Git I can do this:

1. Start working on new feature:
$ git co -b newfeature-123  # (a local feature development branch)
do a few commits (M, N, O)

master A---B---C
                \
newfeature-123   M---N---O

2. Pull new changes from upstream master:
$ git pull
(master updated with ff-commits)

master A---B---C---D---E---F
                \
newfeature-123   M---N---O

3. Rebase off master so that my new feature 
can be developed against the latest upstream changes:
(from newfeature-123)
$ git rebase master

master A---B---C---D---E---F
                            \
newfeature-123               M---N---O


I want to know how to do the same thing in Mercurial, and I've scoured the web for an answer, but the best I could find was: git rebase - can hg do that

That link provides 2 examples:
1. I'll admit that this: (replacing the revisions from the example with those from my own example)

hg up -C F  
hg branch -f newfeature-123  
hg transplant -a -b newfeature-123 

is not too bad, except that it leaves behind the pre-rebase M-N-O as an unmerged head and creates 3 new commits M',N',O' that represent them branching off the updated mainline.

Basically the problem is that I end up with this:

master A---B---C---D---E---F
                \           \
newfeature-123   \           M'---N'---O'
                  \
newfeature-123     M---N---O

this is not good because it leaves behind local, unwanted commits that should be dropped.

  1. The other option from the same link is
hg qimport -r M:O
hg qpop -a
hg up F
hg branch newfeature-123
hg qpush -a
hg qdel -r qbase:qtip

and this does result in the desired graph:

master A---B---C---D---E---F
                            \
newfeature-123               M---N---O

but these commands (all 6 of them!) seem so much more complicated than

$ git rebase master

I want to know if this is the only equivalent in Hg or if there is some other way available that is simple like Git.

share|improve this question
4  
"this is not good because it leaves behind local, unwanted commits that should be dropped." -- actually, git does the same thing. It doesn't change or remove the commits in the original branch, it just makes new ones that apply the same set of changes on top of master. You can still access the old ones using git reflog and they're not totally gone until they get garbage collected. If you want to keep them around in a named branch so that you don't have to use the reflog, just do git branch feature-123_original before rebasing. –  MatrixFrog Dec 24 '10 at 1:55
    
@MatrixFrog Well yeah, but when you want to get rid of something in git, it's just a matter of $ git br -d whatever, and it's gone. And you can easily push any branches to the origin (or whatever authoritative repo you are using) you like, without being forced to push all the crap you aren't ready to--or may never want to--push. hg has the quite stupid focus on "cloning" rather than named branches in workflow. Cloning is stupid, b/c it does not flow smoothly with an IDE and is worse to track in any case. Furthermore, you end up with a big headache trying to keep track of all those dirs. –  orange80 Jul 2 '11 at 4:59
2  
Random question: did you ascii-draw the changesets/branches yourself or is there a tool that does that? –  Amir Rachum Dec 23 '12 at 18:05
1  
Just did them myself with TextWrangler set to "overwrite." –  orange80 Dec 25 '12 at 5:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 166 down vote accepted

VonC has the answer you're looking for, the Rebase Extension. It is, however, worth spending a second or two thinking about why neither mq nor rebase are enabled by default in mercurial: because mercurial is all about indelible changesets. When I work in the manner you're describing, which is nearly daily, here's the pattern I take:

1. Start working on a new feature:
$ hg clone mainline-repo newfeature-123
do a few commits (M, N, O)

master A---B---C
                \
newfeature-123   M---N---O

2. Pull new changes from upstream mainline:
$ hg pull

master A---B---C---D---E---F
                \
newfeature-123   M---N---O

3. merge master into my clone so that my new feature 
can be developed against the latest upstream changes:
(from newfeature-123)
$ hg merge F

master A---B---C---D---E---F
                \           \
newfeature-123   M---N---O---P

and that's really all that's necessary. I end up with a newfeature-123 clone I can easily push back to the mainline when I'm happy with it. Most importantly, however, I never changed history. Someone can look at my csets and see what they were originally coded against and how I reacted to changes in the mainline throughout my work. Not everyone thinks that has value, but I'm a firm believer that it's the job of source control to show us not what we wished had happened, but what actually happened -- every deadend and every refactor should leave an indelible trace, and rebasing and other history editing techniques hide that.

Now go pick VonC's answer while I put my soapbox away. :)

share|improve this answer
32  
+1 for the indelible changeset. –  VonC Apr 20 '10 at 4:39
8  
Note: off course, Git does not exactly allow you to rewrite history, only to create new one easily (utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/tech/GitNewHistory). By adding the RebaseExtension, Mercurial provides the same exact convenient way to replace an old history by a new one. Why? Because a merge is not always the right answer, especially when your changeset should be viewed as evolutions on top of F, and not the reverse (P merged on top of O) –  VonC Apr 20 '10 at 6:21
14  
VonC, I agree, a merge isn't always the right choice, but I think the difference in is what one wants one's VCS history to be able to tell them. I think the history should always be able to answer questions like "What was that way I tried to integrate it at first that didn't work out and I thought was useless at the time". Scientists keep logbooks in pen with numbered pages, and AFAIC software engineers should save every byte they've ever typed. Rewriting history, even cset parentage, but certainly CollapseExtension, HistEdit, etc. violate that. It's totally a matter of personal choice. –  Ry4an Apr 20 '10 at 13:46
6  
+1 for personal choice. With Git I consequently use rebase for trivial diverges and merge for non-trivial. This allows me to preserve merge history where I feel is important, but keep the log clean and linear most of the time. –  Kos Aug 7 '12 at 17:43
11  
Also I do tons of interactive rebases because I tend to firstly do lots of small commits, then join, label and clean them up, then merge them back with (or rebase on top of) the main branch. I like coding and managing changes to be separate steps. –  Kos Aug 7 '12 at 17:45

What is wrong with the Rebase Extension? (implemented as part of the SummerOfCode 2008)

In those cases it can be useful to "detach" the local changes, synchronize the repository with the mainstream and then append the private changes on top of the new remote changes. This operation is called rebase.

Getting from:

alt text

to:

alt text

share|improve this answer
    
I have looked at the Rebase Extension, but it still isn't clear to me. Could you please explain the steps to do what I have described above? –  orange80 Apr 20 '10 at 4:02
1  
@jpswain09: those steps, I believe, are illustrated in mercurial.selenic.com/wiki/RebaseProject: hg pull followed by hg rebase, or hg pull --rebase for short. –  VonC Apr 20 '10 at 4:04
2  
In the case where you aren't pulling the changes in, and you have the two branches in your repo, you can do: hg up newfeature-123 followed by hg rebase -d master --keepbranches –  steprobe May 26 '11 at 9:13
    
I believe nothing is wrong with rebase, it's just a matter of choice. The problem is that rebase gets abused and I'm with @Ry4an on this don't rewrite history so you can know what happen and when. –  Jorge Vargas Aug 1 '11 at 4:46

Assuming you have a modern Hg installation, you can simply add:

[extensions]
rebase = 

to ~/.hgrc.

Then you can use the commands hg rebase, hg pull --rebase, or hg help rebase.

share|improve this answer
    
Just to add to this in-terms of the command then you need to execute would be: hg rebase -s o -d f –  Simple-Solution Dec 23 '13 at 14:08

I don't think the answers above achieve the OP's goal, which was to maintain his task branch, just rebased against a later point on the parent branch.

Let's say I start with this graph (generated using the graphlog extension. Serious geek love for graphlog).

@  9a4c0eb66429 Feature 3 commit 2 tip feature3
|
| o  af630ccb4a80 default againagainagain  
| |
o |  98bdde5d2185 Feature 3 branch commit 1  feature3
|/
o  e9f850ac41da foo   

If I'm on the feature3 branch and want to rebase it off of the againagainagain commit, I understand that I would run "hg rebase -d default". This has the following result:

@  89dada24591e Feature 3 commit 2 tip 
|
o  77dcce88786d Feature 3 branch commit 1  
|
o  af630ccb4a80 default againagainagain  
|
o  e9f850ac41da foo  

Mission accomplished? I don't think so. The problem is that when the commits on the feature3 branch were rebased on againagainagain, the feature3 branch was deleted. My commits have been moved to the default branch, which was what I was trying to avoid in the first place.

In Git, the result would look like this:

@  9a4c0eb66429 Feature 3 commit 2 tip
|
o  98bdde5d2185 Feature 3 branch commit 1 **feature3**
|
o  af630ccb4a80 default againagainagain
|
o  e9f850ac41da foo

Notice that the feature3 branch still exists, the two commits are still on the feature3 branch, and not visible on default. Without preserving the task branch, I don't see how this is functionally different from a merge.

UPDATE: I discovered the --keepbranches flag supported by hg rebase, and I'm happy to report everything is okey-dokey. Using hg rebase -d default --keep-branches, I exactly replicate the Git behavior I craved. A couple of aliases later and I'm rebasing like nobody's business.

share|improve this answer
4  
Just discovered the --keepbranches flag on rebase. Problem solved. Were this my code I'd make that the default, but that's just me. –  Jonathan Blackburn Apr 19 '13 at 16:48
    
I think it'd be useful if you added that bit of information to your response above - took me a while to find it. –  HansMari Apr 21 '13 at 15:14

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