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I am relatively new to implementing JQuery throughout an entire system, and I am enjoying the opportunity.

I have come across one issue I would love to find the correct resolve for.

Here is a simple case example of what I want to do:

I have a button on a page, and on the click event I want to call a jquery function I have defined.

Here is the code I have used to define my method (Page.js):

(function($) {
 $.fn.MessageBox = function(msg) {
  alert(msg);
 };
});

And here is my HTML page:

<HTML>
<head>
 <script type="text/javascript" src="C:\Sandpit\jQueryTest\jquery-1.3.2.js"></script>
 <script language="javascript" src="Page.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
 <div class="Title">Welcome!</div>
 <input type="button" value="ahaha"  onclick="$().MessageBox('msg');" />
</body>
</HTML>

(The above code displays the button, but clicking does nothing.)

I am aware I could add the click event in the document ready event, however it seems more maintainable to put events in the HTML element instead. However I have not found a way to do this.

Is there a way to call a jquery function on a button element (or any input element)? Or is there a better way to do this?

Thanks

EDIT:

Thank you for your responses, it appears I am not using JQuery correctly. I would really love to see an example of a system using JQuery this way and how events are handled. If you know of any examples to demonstrate this please let me know.

My underlying goal for using JQuery is to help simplify and reduce the amount of javascript required for a large-scale web application.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I don't think there's any reason to add this function to JQuery's namespace. Why not just define the method by itself:

function showMessage(msg) {
   alert(msg);
};

<input type="button" value="ahaha" onclick="showMessage('msg');" />

UPDATE: With a small change to how your method is defined I can get it to work:

<html>
<head>
 <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
 <script language="javascript">
    // define the function within the global scope
    $.fn.MessageBox = function(msg) {
        alert(msg);
    };

    // or, if you want to encapsulate variables within the plugin
    (function($) {
        $.fn.MessageBoxScoped = function(msg) {
            alert(msg);
        };
    })(jQuery); //<-- make sure you pass jQuery into the $ parameter
 </script>
</head>
<body>
 <div class="Title">Welcome!</div>
 <input type="button" value="ahaha" id="test" onClick="$(this).MessageBox('msg');" />
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
This is an example function, to demonstrate the problem. –  Russell Apr 20 '10 at 3:44
1  
OK.. I've updated with an example which works using your preferred method - both scoped or unscoped. –  Dexter Apr 20 '10 at 4:07
    
Thanks @Dexter, that worked fine :) Note version 1.4.2 works, while 1.3.2 wont work. –  Russell Apr 20 '10 at 4:31

Don't do this!

Stay away from putting the events inline with the elements! If you don't, you're missing the point of JQuery (or one of the biggest ones at least).

The reason why it's easy to define click() handlers one way and not the other is that the other way is simply not desirable. Since you're just learning JQuery, stick to the convention. Now is not the time in your learning curve for JQuery to decide that everyone else is doing it wrong and you have a better way!

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Dave, I am not saying everyone else is doing it wrong. I am wondering how jquery can "simplify javascript" if instead of adding events inline to add events to a list of javascript function calls in a separate js file? How would a developer know which events are beign fired by which elements? I appreciate your answer and would really like to use (and work with, not against) Jquery. :) –  Russell Apr 20 '10 at 5:15
    
There are a couple of ways to do this. You don't have to have a separate JS file. If you want, you can just stick your script in a <script> block at the top of your file. The recommended way of doing this is to give each element an ID, say <input id="foo"> and then wire up your events with $("#foo").click(...); at the top of your page. If you're using ASP.NET 3 or earlier and you can't give elements an ID, give your elements a very specific class name and select them that way. If your IDs are clearly named, it will be easy for a reader to understand. –  Dave Markle Apr 20 '10 at 11:08

you forgot to add this in your function : change to this :

<input type="button" value="ahaha"  onclick="$(this).MessageBox('msg');" />
share|improve this answer
1  
This still doesn't work. :( –  Russell Apr 20 '10 at 3:50
    
This doesn't work.. at least in my tests –  Dexter Apr 20 '10 at 3:50

this works....

<script language="javascript">
    (function($) {
     $.fn.MessageBox = function(msg) {
       return this.each(function(){
         alert(msg);
       })
     };
    })(jQuery);​ 
</script>

.

   <body>
      <div class="Title">Welcome!</div>
     <input type="button" value="ahaha"  onclick="$(this).MessageBox('msg');" />
    </body>

edit

you are using a failsafe jQuery code using the $ alias... it should be written like:

(function($) {
  // plugin code here, use $ as much as you like
})(jQuery); 

or

jQuery(function($) {
   // your code using $ alias here
 });

note that it has a 'jQuery' word in each of it....

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Reigel, thanks. This is what I am looking for :) –  Russell Apr 20 '10 at 4:08
    
Is this a common/popular way to handle this kind of global function exposure? –  Russell Apr 20 '10 at 4:08
    
please see edit –  Reigel Apr 20 '10 at 4:13

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