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Is there any tool or framework able to make it easier to test distributed software written in Java? My system under test is a peer-to-peer software, and I'd like to perform testing using something like PNUnit, but with Java instead of .Net.

The system under test is a framework I'm developing to build P2P applications. It uses JXTA as a lower subsystem, trying to hide some complexities of it. It's currently an academic project, so I'm pursuing simplicity at this moment.

In my test, I want to demonstrate that a peer (running in its own process, possibly with multiple threads) can discover another one (running in another process or even another machine) and that they can exchange a few messages. I'm not using mocks nor stubs because I need to see both sides working simultaneously. I realize that some kind of coordination mechanism is needed, and PNUnit seems to be able to do that.

I've bumped into some initiatives like Pisces, which "aims to provide a distributed testing environment that extends JUnit, giving the developer/tester an ability to run remote JUnits and create complex test suites that are composed of several remote JUnit tests running in parallel or serially", but this project and a few others I have found seem to be long dead.

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Umm ... I would not call that unit testing. I'd call it system or integration testing of either the functional test or performance/load test variety. –  Stephen C Apr 20 '10 at 6:30
    
Yes, I tend to agree with you, Stephen. In my case, this is not performance (load, stress, you name it) testing because the intent of the test is to show the system's parts do work as planned. For example, each component should be able to discover others, send and answer messages, etc. Thus, I'd say this is more of a functional test or even a small integration test because it focuses on a few interactions involving a pair of peers. Please, see the augmented description above for more details about the software, and thanks for you attention. –  msugar Apr 24 '10 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

Testing distributed software depends greatly on what type of software it is, so for a complete answer I will need to know what your software does. However looking at PNUnit it seams that most of what it does is allow for synchronization, ordering and parallel execution of tests. TestNG also supports this, for instance, you can do:

@Test(threadPoolSize = 3, invocationCount = 10,  timeOut = 10000)
public void testServer() {
   :
}

which will invoke the function testServer ten times from three different threads. The change-log of TestNG 4.5 also hints at the possibility of running remote tests, more info is available in this blog post.

Alternatively you can checkout IBM's ConTest software for testing parallel and distributed software (there is a great description of how to use it here). I have had great success using it to expose bugs in my concurrent applications.

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Lars, thanks a lot for your attention. I've augmented the description about the software. Please, let me know if you need additional details to figure it out better. In this particular case, I think PNUnit is closer to satisfy my requirements than TestNG (unfortunately, I don't want to work with another platform besides Java, so PNUnit is out of question for me), but the truth is that I don't know TestNG as well as JUnit. I'll give it some more attention, but I'm afraid I'm in a blind alley here... –  msugar Apr 24 '10 at 18:42

Well, there is a way which is very simple and does not require to learn any new framework. You can test the logs produced by the applications across your distributed environment using grep4j. Have a look here and here for more info.

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