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Assuming I declare

var ad = {}; 

How can I check whether this object will contain any user-defined properties?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 44 down vote accepted

You can loop over the properties of your object as follows:

for(var prop in ad) {
    if (ad.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
        // handle prop as required
    }
}

It is important to use the hasOwnProperty() method, to determine whether the object has the specified property as a direct property, and not inherited from the object's prototype chain.

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1  
Hi Daniel, actually I'm seeking a device to check whether an object contains user-defined properies or not. Not to check whether a specific property exist. – Ricky Apr 21 '10 at 2:40
5  
@Ricky: You can put that code in a function, and make it return false as soon as it reaches the part where there is the comment. – Daniel Vassallo Apr 21 '10 at 4:11
5  
I think these days using Object.keys would be the easiest: var a = [1,2,3];a.something=4;console.log(Object.keys(a)) Because it's already part of ECMA 5 you can safely shim it: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – HMR Nov 15 '13 at 13:32
1  
Note that "these days" with ES5, native objects can have non–enumerable own properties, e.g. Object.defineProperty(obj, 'foo', {enumerable:false, value:'foo'}). – RobG Jun 4 '14 at 3:35

What about making a simple function?

function isEmptyObject(obj) {
  for(var prop in obj) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, prop)) {
      return false;
    }
  }
  return true;
}

isEmptyObject({}); // true
isEmptyObject({foo:'bar'});  // false

The hasOwnProperty method call directly on the Object.prototype is only to add little more safety, imagine the following using a normal obj.hasOwnProperty(...) call:

isEmptyObject({hasOwnProperty:'boom'});  // false

Note: (for the future) The above method relies on the for...in statement, and this statement iterates only over enumerable properties, in the currently most widely implemented ECMAScript Standard (3rd edition) the programmer doesn't have any way to create non-enumerable properties.

However this has changed now with ECMAScript 5th Edition, and we are able to create non-enumerable, non-writable or non-deletable properties, so the above method can fail, e.g.:

var obj = {};
Object.defineProperty(obj, 'test', { value: 'testVal', 
  enumerable: false,
  writable: true,
  configurable: true
});
isEmptyObject(obj); // true, wrong!!
obj.hasOwnProperty('test'); // true, the property exist!!

An ECMAScript 5 solution to this problem would be:

function isEmptyObject(obj) {
  return Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj).length === 0;
}

The Object.getOwnPropertyNames method returns an Array containing the names of all the own properties of an object, enumerable or not, this method is being implemented now by browser vendors, it's already on the Chrome 5 Beta and the latest WebKit Nightly Builds.

Object.defineProperty is also available on those browsers and latest Firefox 3.7 Alpha releases.

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1  
What is the advantage to Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, prop) over obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)? – Casey Chu Apr 20 '10 at 7:11
1  
@Casey, edited, if an object overrides the hasOwnProperty property, the function might crash... I know I'm a little bit paranoid... but sometimes you don't know in which kind of environment your code will be used, but you know what method you want to use... – CMS Apr 20 '10 at 7:13
2  
+1 for answering this question... and other questions of the future! :) – Daniel Vassallo Apr 20 '10 at 7:49
1  
Note there is also a bug in IE where if you have a property with a name that matches a non-enumerable property in Object.prototype, it doesn't get enumerated by for...in. So isEmptyObject({toString:1}) will fail. This is one of the unfortunate reasons you can't quite use Object as a general-purpose mapping. – bobince Apr 20 '10 at 7:58
    
@bobnice, Oh yes, that bug is pretty serious, fortunately this is one of the ES-deviations that disappeared on IE9. – CMS Apr 20 '10 at 16:02

With jQuery you can use:

$.isEmptyObject(obj); // Returns: Boolean

As of jQuery 1.4 this method checks both properties on the object itself and properties inherited from prototypes (in that it doesn't use hasOwnProperty).

With ECMAScript 5th Edition in modern browsers (IE9+, FF4+, Chrome5+, Opera12+, Safari5+) you can use the built in Object.keys method:

var obj = { blah: 1 };
var isEmpty = !Object.keys(obj).length;

Or plain old JavaScript:

var isEmpty = function(obj) {
               for(var p in obj){
                  return false;
               }
               return true;
            };
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1  
I think these days using Object.keys would be the easiest: var a = [1,2,3];a.something=4;console.log(Object.keys(a)) – HMR Nov 15 '13 at 13:30
    
Great! I've updated my answer. – kayz1 Nov 15 '13 at 14:19
    
Thanks for the ECMAScript 5 method – jpaugh Jun 18 '15 at 13:44

If you're using underscore.js then you can use the _.isEmpty function:

var obj = {};
var emptyObject = _.isEmpty(obj);
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Just for anyone passing by, this is not a method dedicated to objects. _.isEmpty([]) // true Be sure to check first: stackoverflow.com/a/22482737/1922747 – djv Jan 2 at 19:45

Most recent browsers (and node.js) support Object.keys() which returns an array with all the keys in your object literal so you could do the following:

var ad = {}; 
Object.keys(ad).length;//this will be 0 in this case

Browser Support: Firefox 4, Chrome 5, Internet Explorer 9, Opera 12, Safari 5

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/keys

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for(var memberName in ad)
{
  //Member Name: memberName
  //Member Value: ad[memberName]
}

Member means Member property, member variable, whatever you want to call it >_>

The above code will return EVERYTHING, including toString... If you only want to see if the object's prototype has been extended:

var dummyObj = {};  
for(var memberName in ad)
{
  if(typeof(dummyObj[memberName]) == typeof(ad[memberName])) continue; //note A
  //Member Name: memberName
  //Member Value: ad[memberName]

}

Note A: We check to see if the dummy object's member has the same type as our testing object's member. If it is an extend, dummyobject's member type should be "undefined"

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Hi, can I just know whether an object contain properties or not? Thanks – Ricky Apr 20 '10 at 6:50
    
in your solution there is no filtering for unwanted prototype properties, that means it might be misbehaving when using a library like Prototype.js or an unexperienced user added additional prototype properties to the object. – Joscha Apr 20 '10 at 6:51
    
check out Daniels solution on this page - its less error-prone! – Joscha Apr 20 '10 at 6:52
2  
Your first code block does not cover it at all. the second code block misbehaves if I add a variable to the "ad" object which is undefined. Really, check out Daniels answer, it's the only correct one and fast, as it uses a native implementation called "hasOwnProperty". – Joscha Apr 20 '10 at 6:54
    
@Ricky: If you want to check whether an object contains properties, you can simply use the example in my answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/2673121/…. If the code reaches the comment, your object would not have any direct properties. If not, it would. – Daniel Vassallo Apr 20 '10 at 6:59
for (var hasProperties in ad) break;
if (hasProperties)
    ... // ad has properties

If you have to be safe and check for Object prototypes (these are added by certain libraries and not there by default):

var hasProperties = false;
for (var x in ad) {
    if (ad.hasOwnProperty(x)) {
        hasProperties = true;
        break;
    }
}
if (hasProperties)
    ... // ad has properties
share|improve this answer
1  
in your solution there is no filtering for unwanted prototype properties, that means it might be misbehaving when using a library like Prototype.js or an unexperienced user added additional prototype properties to the object. Check out Daniels solution on this page. – Joscha Apr 20 '10 at 6:55
    
You don't have to use a library or be unexperienced to extend an object's prototype. Some experienced programmers do this all the time. – Alsciende Apr 21 '10 at 8:15

If you are willing to use lodash, you can use the some method.

_.some(obj) // returns true or false

See this small jsbin example

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var x = [1,2] // true – djv Dec 30 '15 at 18:51
    
@damionjn I added your code to the example. I see your point with the array returning the wrong answer, but OP initially declared a variable as an object so I believe its alright to assume this. There is an answer above which uses the underscores isEmpty method (lodash has the same method). That answer has the exact same issue. If you give isEmpty a non empty array you will also get the wrong result. – sfs Jan 1 at 20:41
    
Fair enough, but we should be providing answers with all bases covered to be sure of best practices. You're right, I passed right by his answer without any criticism. Just for anyone passing by, this is not a method dedicated to objects. _.some([1, 2]) // true Be sure to check first: stackoverflow.com/a/13356338/1922747 – djv Jan 2 at 19:42

There are two ways of doing it:

  1. propName in obj
  2. obj.hasOwnProperty(propName)

However, pay attention: there is a very big difference between the two:

The first one will return true if obj has a property named propName (obj.propName), however if it will not find one, it will keep looking for propName down the prototype tree. If it will find one there, the expression will return true otherwise it will return false.

The second example will check only the object itself without checking its prototype(s). This is much like iterating an array.

Example:

function Obj(){
    this.a = undefined;
    this.b = null;
    this.c = false;
}

Obj.prototype = {
    d: true,
    e: true
};

var obj = new Obj();

And to test it:

"a" in obj  // true
"e" in obj  // true

obj.hasOwnProperty("a")  // true
obj.hasOwnProperty("e")  // false
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When sure that the object is a user-defined one, the easiest way to determine if UDO is empty, would be the following code:

isEmpty=
/*b.b Troy III p.a.e*/
function(x,p){for(p in x)return!1;return!0};

Even though this method is (by nature) a deductive one, - it's the quickest, and fastest possible.

a={};
isEmpty(a) >> true

a.b=1
isEmpty(a) >> false 

p.s.: !don't use it on browser-defined objects.

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...return 0; return 1}; would be the same ? – commonpike Nov 23 '12 at 15:09
1  
@pike no, return!1;return!0 is the same as return false;return true – Christophe Jan 31 '13 at 20:33

Late answer, but some frameworks handle objects as enumerables. Therefore, bob.js can do it like this:

var objToTest = {};
var propertyCount = bob.collections.extend(objToTest).count();
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var hasAnyProps = false; for (var key in obj) { hasAnyProps = true; break; }
// as of this line hasAnyProps will show Boolean whether or not any iterable props exist

Simple, works in every browser, and even though it's technically a loop for all keys on the object it does NOT loop through them all...either there's 0 and the loop doesn't run or there is some and it breaks after the first one (because all we're checking is if there's ANY...so why continue?)

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