Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am developing a c/c++ program on linux. Can you please tell me if there is any c/c++ library which decodes url?

I am looking for libraries which convert "http%3A%2F%2F" to: "http://"

or "a+t+%26+t" to "a t & t"

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
@sbi: Doesn't look like a dupe to me. – greyfade Apr 20 '10 at 7:37
    
@greyfade: Oops, I got the wrong question. Sorry for the confusion. There was a similar one, though, just a few days ago. – sbi Apr 20 '10 at 9:08
    
I'd say there's a dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/2616011 – sbi Apr 20 '10 at 9:12
    
why not curl? curl.haxx.se/libcurl/c/curl_unescape.html – hB0 Oct 28 '13 at 14:15

I actually used Saul's function in an analysis program I was writing (analyzing millions of URL encoded strings), and while it works, at that scale it was slowing my program down horribly, so I decided to write a faster version. This one is thousands of times faster when compiled with GCC and the -O2 option. It can also use the same output buffer as the input (e.g. urldecode2(buf, buf) will work if the original string was in buf and is to be overwritten by its decoded counterpart).

Edit: It doesn't take the buffer size as an input because it is assumed that the buffer will be large enough, this is safe because it is known that the length of the output will always be <= that of the input, so either use the same buffer for the output or create one that's at least the size of the input + 1 for the null terminator, e.g.:

char *output = malloc(strlen(input)+1);
urldecode2(output, input);
printf("Decoded string: %s\n", output);

Edit 2: An anonymous user attempted to edit this answer to handle the '+' character's translation to ' ', which I think it should probably do, again this wasn't something that I needed for my application, but I've added it below.

Here's the routine:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>

void urldecode2(char *dst, const char *src)
{
        char a, b;
        while (*src) {
                if ((*src == '%') &&
                    ((a = src[1]) && (b = src[2])) &&
                    (isxdigit(a) && isxdigit(b))) {
                        if (a >= 'a')
                                a -= 'a'-'A';
                        if (a >= 'A')
                                a -= ('A' - 10);
                        else
                                a -= '0';
                        if (b >= 'a')
                                b -= 'a'-'A';
                        if (b >= 'A')
                                b -= ('A' - 10);
                        else
                                b -= '0';
                        *dst++ = 16*a+b;
                        src+=3;
                } else if (*src == '+') {
                        *dst++ = ' ';
                        src++;
                } else {
                        *dst++ = *src++;
                }
        }
        *dst++ = '\0';
}
share|improve this answer
    
The substraction should be the other way around. Right now it's producing negative values and only works when using capital HEX letters. – anavarroma Oct 22 '13 at 12:51
1  
Thanks for this. I was able to put it to use today. As Adrià commented, the "a -= 'A' - 'a'" and b -= 'A' - 'a'" calcs were wrong and gave bad results for lowercase hex digits. I took the liberty to correct this with my editing privileges. Now the example processes upper and lowercase hex correctly. – Multimedia Mike Dec 6 '13 at 6:54

The ever-excellent glib has some URI functions, including scehem-extraction, escaping and un-escaping.

share|improve this answer
1  
Unless the OP is using glib to begin with(I assume he's not if he's using C++), glib is overkill if the sole purpose is to use its URI functions. It's not a small library. – Void Apr 20 '10 at 17:38

This function I've just whipped up is very lightweight and should do as you wish, note I haven't programmed this to strict URI standards (used what I know off the top of my head). It's buffer-safe and doesn't overflow as far as I can see; adapt as you deem fit:

#include <assert.h>

void urldecode(char *pszDecodedOut, size_t nBufferSize, const char *pszEncodedIn)
{
    memset(pszDecodedOut, 0, nBufferSize);

    enum DecodeState_e
    {
        STATE_SEARCH = 0, ///< searching for an ampersand to convert
        STATE_CONVERTING, ///< convert the two proceeding characters from hex
    };

    DecodeState_e state = STATE_SEARCH;

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < strlen(pszEncodedIn)-1; ++i)
    {
        switch(state)
        {
        case STATE_SEARCH:
            {
                if(pszEncodedIn[i] != '%')
                {
                    strncat(pszDecodedOut, &pszEncodedIn[i], 1);
                    assert(strlen(pszDecodedOut) < nBufferSize);
                    break;
                }

                // We are now converting
                state = STATE_CONVERTING;
            }
            break;

        case STATE_CONVERTING:
            {
                // Conversion complete (i.e. don't convert again next iter)
                state = STATE_SEARCH;

                // Create a buffer to hold the hex. For example, if %20, this
                // buffer would hold 20 (in ASCII)
                char pszTempNumBuf[3] = {0};
                strncpy(pszTempNumBuf, &pszEncodedIn[i], 2);

                // Ensure both characters are hexadecimal
                bool bBothDigits = true;

                for(int j = 0; j < 2; ++j)
                {
                    if(!isxdigit(pszTempNumBuf[j]))
                        bBothDigits = false;
                }

                if(!bBothDigits)
                    break;

                // Convert two hexadecimal characters into one character
                int nAsciiCharacter;
                sscanf(pszTempNumBuf, "%x", &nAsciiCharacter);

                // Ensure we aren't going to overflow
                assert(strlen(pszDecodedOut) < nBufferSize);

                // Concatenate this character onto the output
                strncat(pszDecodedOut, (char*)&nAsciiCharacter, 1);

                // Skip the next character
                i++;
            }
            break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I think Saul's function needs the assert in the STATE_SEARCH case as well. Otherwise you could have a long url/uri with no hex codes, and it won't trigger the assert because state will never be STATE_CONVERTING. – David Winiecki Oct 16 '11 at 15:51
    
Fixed, thanks David. – Saul Feb 1 '12 at 19:37
    
@Saul suffring from NIH? – Yevgeniy Sep 5 '12 at 20:11
    
Is this function working perfect? and what about this one: stackoverflow.com/a/4823686/452090 – hB0 Nov 8 '13 at 23:07

Here is a C decoder for a percent encoded string. It returns -1 if the encoding is invalid and 0 otherwise. The decoded string is stored in out. I'm quite sure this is the fastest code of the answers given so far.

int percent_decode(char* out, const char* in) {
{
    static const char tbl[256] = {
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
         0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,  8, 9,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,10,11,12,13,14,15,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,10,11,12,13,14,15,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,
        -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1, -1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1
    };
    char c, v1, v2, beg=out;
    if(in != NULL) {
        while((c=*in++) != '\0') {
            if(c == '%') {
                if(!(v1=*in++) || (v1=tbl[(unsigned char)v1])<0 || 
                   !(v2=*in++) || (v2=tbl[(unsigned char)v2])<0) {
                    *beg = '\0';
                    return -1;
                }
                c = (v1<<4)|v2;
            }
            *out++ = c;
        }
    }
    *out = '\0';
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I like it - the !(v1=*in++) and !(v2=*in++) are redundant though since tbl[0] will return -1 anyway. Instead you can do: if((v1=tbl[(unsigned char)*in++])<0 || (v2=tbl[(unsigned char)*in++])<0) { ... – Gaspard Petit Dec 29 '15 at 21:26

uriparser library is small and lightweight.

share|improve this answer

Try urlcpp https://github.com/larroy/urlcpp It's a C++ module that you can easily integrate in your project, depends on boost::regex

share|improve this answer

I'd suggest curl and libcurl. It's widely used and should do the trick for you. Just check their website.

share|improve this answer
/**
 * Locale-independent conversion of ASCII characters to lowercase.
 */
int av_tolower(int c)
{
    if (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z')
        c ^= 0x20;
    return c;
}
/**
 * Decodes an URL from its percent-encoded form back into normal
 * representation. This function returns the decoded URL in a string.
 * The URL to be decoded does not necessarily have to be encoded but
 * in that case the original string is duplicated.
 *
 * @param url a string to be decoded.
 * @return new string with the URL decoded or NULL if decoding failed.
 * Note that the returned string should be explicitly freed when not
 * used anymore.
 */
char *urldecode(const char *url)
{
    int s = 0, d = 0, url_len = 0;
    char c;
    char *dest = NULL;

    if (!url)
        return NULL;

    url_len = strlen(url) + 1;
    dest = av_malloc(url_len);

    if (!dest)
        return NULL;

    while (s < url_len) {
        c = url[s++];

        if (c == '%' && s + 2 < url_len) {
            char c2 = url[s++];
            char c3 = url[s++];
            if (isxdigit(c2) && isxdigit(c3)) {
                c2 = av_tolower(c2);
                c3 = av_tolower(c3);

                if (c2 <= '9')
                    c2 = c2 - '0';
                else
                    c2 = c2 - 'a' + 10;

                if (c3 <= '9')
                    c3 = c3 - '0';
                else
                    c3 = c3 - 'a' + 10;

                dest[d++] = 16 * c2 + c3;

            } else { /* %zz or something other invalid */
                dest[d++] = c;
                dest[d++] = c2;
                dest[d++] = c3;
            }
        } else if (c == '+') {
            dest[d++] = ' ';
        } else {
            dest[d++] = c;
        }

    }

    return dest;
}

by
www.elesos.com
share|improve this answer
    
Is this flawless? – hB0 Nov 9 '13 at 7:25

Thanks to @ThomasH for his answer. I'd like to propose here a better formattation…

And… since the decoded URI component is always less long than the same encoded URI component, is always possible to implode it within the same array of characters (a.k.a.: "string"). So, I'll propose here two possibilities:

#include <stdio.h>

int decodeURIComponent (char *sSource, char *sDest) {
    int nLength;
    for (nLength = 0; *sSource; nLength++) {
        if (*sSource == '%' && sSource[1] && sSource[2] && isxdigit(sSource[1]) && isxdigit(sSource[2])) {
            sSource[1] -= sSource[1] <= '9' ? '0' : (sSource[1] <= 'F' ? 'A' : 'a')-10;
            sSource[2] -= sSource[2] <= '9' ? '0' : (sSource[2] <= 'F' ? 'A' : 'a')-10;
            sDest[nLength] = 16 * sSource[1] + sSource[2];
            sSource += 3;
            continue;
        }
        sDest[nLength] = *sSource++;
    }
    sDest[nLength] = '\0';
    return nLength;
}

#define implodeURIComponent(url) decodeURIComponent(url, url)

And, finally…:

int main () {

    char sMyUrl[] = "http%3a%2F%2ffoo+bar%2fabcd";

    int nNewLength = implodeURIComponent(sMyUrl);

    /* Let's print: "http://foo+bar/abcd\nLength: 19" */
    printf("%s\nLength: %d\n", sMyUrl, nNewLength);

    return 0;

}

Ste*

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.