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Using reflection, how can I get all types that implement an interface with C# 3.0/.NET 3.5 with the least code, and minimizing iterations?

This is what I want to re-write:

foreach (Type t in this.GetType().Assembly.GetTypes())
    if (t is IMyInterface)
        ; //do stuff
share|improve this question
    
Does the example code works? I've got false negatives with your if condition. –  Emperor Orionii Dec 15 '12 at 15:20
    
There is no C# 3.5. I edited the title –  nawfal Apr 28 '13 at 6:05
    
The if statement in the code above will always be false because you are testing if an instance of the Type class (t) implements your interface which it won't unless Type inherits IMyInterface (in which case it will always be true). –  Liazy Jun 26 '13 at 12:09

10 Answers 10

up vote 327 down vote accepted

Mine would be this in c# 3.0 :)

var type = typeof(IMyInterface);
var types = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
    .SelectMany(s => s.GetTypes())
    .Where(p => type.IsAssignableFrom(p));

Basically, the least amount of iterations will always be:

loop assemblies  
 loop types  
  see if implemented.
share|improve this answer
37  
Note that the list may also include the interface itself. Change the last line to .Where(p => type.IsAssignableFrom(p) && !p.IsInterface); to filter it out (or p.IsClass). –  Josh P Dec 2 '13 at 21:21
5  
Note:This answer is wrong!, this checks "Assignment compatibility" not whether interface is implemented are not. For example List<string> doesn't implement IEnumerable<object> but this method will return true in .Net 4.0 due to covariance which is wrong indeed. Correct answer is here –  Sriram Sakthivel Apr 8 at 7:29
1  
@SriramSakthivel first off, generic values weren't specified. Second, this question pre-dates covariance. Third, you make the assumption that covariant return is not something they want. –  Darren Kopp Apr 8 at 13:45
4  
You're absolutely right darren, I know this is a old thread, I just registered my comment just for the future users to make aware of such problem exist. Not to offend you. and as question title says if OP is asking for Getting all types that implement an interface this code isn't doing that. but almost all the cases it works, no doubt. there are corner cases too as I said. Just to be aware of it; –  Sriram Sakthivel Apr 8 at 16:13

To find all types in an assembly that implement IFoo interface:

var results = from type in someAssembly.GetTypes()
              where typeof(IFoo).IsAssignableFrom(type)
              select type;

Note that Ryan Rinaldi's suggestion was incorrect. It will return 0 types. You cannot write

where type is IFoo

because type is a System.Type instance, and will never be of type IFoo. Instead, you check to see if IFoo is assignable from the type. That will get your expected results.

Also, Adam Wright's suggestion, which is currently marked as the answer, is incorrect as well, and for the same reason. At runtime, you'll see 0 types come back, because all System.Type instances weren't IFoo implementors.

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This worked for me. It loops though the classes and checks to see if they are derrived from myInterface

 foreach (Type mytype in System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes().Where(mytype => mytype .GetInterfaces().Contains(typeof(myInterface))))
 {
    //do stuff
 }

Ben

share|improve this answer
    
You are assuming the assembly is in the main executable. Not an additional project. You are also iterating unnecessarily though a bunch of iterations. It is better to have the framework do the heavy lifting. Then filter down farther when found. If relevant, please update your answer. Include List<T> reasoning. var classTypesImplementingInterface = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().SelectMany(x => x.GetTypes()).Where(mytype => typeof(myInterface).IsAssignableFrom(mytype) && mytype.GetInterfaces().Contains(typeof(myInterface))); foreach(var item in items) Console.Log(item.Name); –  TamusJRoyce Aug 29 at 2:37

Other answers here use IsAssignableFrom. You can also use FindInterfaces from the System namespace, as described here.

Here's an example that checks all assemblies in the currently executing assembly's folder, looking for classes that implement a certain interface (avoiding LINQ for clarity).

    static void Main()
    {
        const string qualifiedInterfaceName = "Interfaces.IMyInterface";
        var interfaceFilter = new TypeFilter(InterfaceFilter);

        var path = Path.GetDirectoryName(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location);

        var di = new DirectoryInfo(path);
        foreach (var file in di.GetFiles("*.dll"))
        {
            try
            {
                var nextAssembly = Assembly.ReflectionOnlyLoadFrom(file.FullName);

                foreach (var type in nextAssembly.GetTypes())
                {
                    var myInterfaces = type.FindInterfaces(interfaceFilter, qualifiedInterfaceName);
                    if (myInterfaces.Length > 0)
                    {
                        // This class implements the interface
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (BadImageFormatException)
            {
                // Not a .net assembly  - ignore
            }                
        }
    }

    public static bool InterfaceFilter(Type typeObj, Object criteriaObj)
    {
        return typeObj.ToString() == criteriaObj.ToString();
    }

You can set up a list of interfaces if you want to match more than one.

In terms of "minimum" code, this can be reduced, e.g. by using LINQ in the foreach. Bear in mind that "minimal" doesn't necessarily mean efficient, or easily debugged, or easily understood by someone else...

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This one looks for string interface name which is what I was looking for. –  senthil Jan 9 '13 at 16:54

loop through all loaded assemblies, loop through all their types, and check if they implement the interface.

something like:

Type ti = typeof(IYourInterface);
foreach (Assembly asm in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies())
{
    foreach (Type t in asm.GetTypes())
    {
        if (ti.IsAssignableFrom(t))
        {
            // here's your type in t
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Edit: I've just seen the edit to clarify that the original question was for the reduction of iterations / code and that's all well and good as an exercise, but in real-world situations you're going to want the fastest implementation, regardless of how cool the underlying LINQ looks.

Here's my Utils method for iterating through the loaded types. It handles regular classes as well as interfaces, and the excludeSystemTypes option speeds things up hugely if you are looking for implementations in your own / third-party codebase.

public static List<Type> GetSubclassesOf(this Type type, bool excludeSystemTypes)
{
    List<Type> list = new List<Type>();
    IEnumerator enumerator = Thread.GetDomain().GetAssemblies().GetEnumerator();
    while (enumerator.MoveNext())
    {
        try
        {
            Type[] types = ((Assembly) enumerator.Current).GetTypes();
            if (!excludeSystemTypes || (excludeSystemTypes && !((Assembly) enumerator.Current).FullName.StartsWith("System.")))
            {
                IEnumerator enumerator2 = types.GetEnumerator();
                while (enumerator2.MoveNext())
                {
                    Type current = (Type) enumerator2.Current;
                    if (type.IsInterface)
                    {
                        if (current.GetInterface(type.FullName) != null)
                        {
                            list.Add(current);
                        }
                    }
                    else if (current.IsSubclassOf(type))
                    {
                        list.Add(current);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        catch
        {
        }
    }
    return list;
}

It's not pretty, I'll admit.

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This worked for me (if you wish you could exclude system types in the lookup):

Type lookupType = typeof (IMenuItem);
IEnumerable<Type> lookupTypes = GetType().Assembly.GetTypes().Where(
        t => lookupType.IsAssignableFrom(t) && !t.IsInterface); 
share|improve this answer

The post I linked shows how to load a dll and the reflect over it.

This might not be the smallest implementation but it worked for me. Se: this post

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There's no easy way (in terms of performance) to do what you want to do.

Reflection works with assemblys and types mainly so you'll have to get all the types of the assembly and query them for the right interface. Here's an example:

Assembly asm = Assembly.Load("MyAssembly");
Type[] types = asm.GetTypes();
Type[] result = types.where(x => x.GetInterface("IMyInterface") != null);

That will get you all the types that implement the IMyInterface in the Assembly MyAssembly

share|improve this answer

You could use some LINQ to get the list:

var types = from type in this.GetType().Assembly.GetTypes()
            where type is ISomeInterface
            select type;

But really, is that more readable?

share|improve this answer
4  
It might be more readable, if it worked. Unfortunately, your where clause is checking to see if an instance of the System.Type class implements ISomeInterface, which will never be true, unless ISomeInterface is really IReflect or ICustomAttributeProvider, in which case it will always be true. –  Joel Mueller May 29 '09 at 20:22

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