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Sorry for the vague title but I really didn't know what title to give to this problem:

I have the following result set:

ID   Field   FieldValue   Culture
1    Color   Groen        nl-NL
2    Taste   Kip          nl-NL
3    Color   Green        en-GB
4    Taste   Chicken      en-GB
5    Color   Green        en
6    Taste   Chicken      en

I would like to mimic the ASP.Net way of resource selection, user Culture (nl-NL)

SELECT Field, FieldValue FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'nl-NL'

Or when there are no results for the specific culture, try the parent Culture (nl)

SELECT Field, FieldValue FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'nl'

Or when there are no results for the parent culture, try the default Culture (en)

SELECT Field, FieldValue FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'en'

How can I combine these SELECT-statements in one T-SQL statement?
I'm using LINQ so a LINQ expression would be even greater.

The OR-statement won't work, because I don't want a mix of cultures.
The ORDER BY-statement won't help, because it returns multiple records per culture.

The output might look like (nl-NL):

Color   Groen
Taste   Kip

or (en-GB / en):

Color   Green
Taste   Chicken
share|improve this question
    
What is your desired output then? Are you trying to implement fallback where a string hasn't been translated to the preferred locale? (if so, you'd need some kind of id to tie up equivalent stringS) –  Rowland Shaw Apr 20 '10 at 11:47
    
What if the language you request has some values but not all? For example, if nl-NL includes a value for taste, but does not include a value for color, do you need to return the nl-NL taste and the nl fallback value for color? And do you really eat green chicken in the Netherlands? –  Ray Apr 20 '10 at 12:15
    
@Zyphrax: does each culture has their own complete set of fields and values pairs? i.e. if culture en has field value pair entry of shape, circle, the rest of the language will have their own field value pair of shape, circle ? –  Michael Buen Apr 20 '10 at 15:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So, here is the code that does exactly what's written in your example. It is expected that you determine specific culture (nl-NL), neutral culture (nl), and fallback culture (en) in the client-side code and feed these values to SQL.

SELECT Field, FieldValue FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = (
    SELECT TOP 1 Culture FROM (
        SELECT 1 as n, Culture FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'nl-NL'
        UNION
        SELECT 2, Culture FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'nl'
        UNION
        SELECT 3, Culture FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'en'
    ) cultures
    ORDER BY n
)

Are you sure you need the whole translation table for a given culture, not a translation of each string? What if you have string A and B in en, but only string A in nl-NL?

share|improve this answer

Try this:

SELECT Field, FieldValue FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'nl-NL' 

union

SELECT Field, FieldValue FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'nl' 
and not exists(select * from tbl where culture = 'nl-NL')

union

SELECT Field, FieldValue FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'en' 
and not exists(select * from tbl where culture = 'nl-NL')
and not exists(select * from tbl where culture = 'nl')

Linq:

var x = (from a in tbl
        where culture == "nl-NL"
        select a
        )

        .Union

        (from a in tbl
        where culture == "nl"
        && !tbl.Any(c => c.Culture == "nl-NL")
        select a
        )

        .Union
        (from a in tbl
        where culture == "en"
        && !tbl.Any(c => c.Culture == "nl-NL")
        && !tbl.Any(c => c.Culture == "nl")
        select a
        );
share|improve this answer
    
The EXISTS statements in the SQL do not look correct. The way this reads, if there are any rows received in the first SELECT, then nothing further will be added in the UNION. I think this is the right approach, but the subqueries need to be correlated with the selected rows of the main queries. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 20 '10 at 14:13
    
It works, and it is not order-dependent. It doesn't need to be correlated, just need to test(using EXISTS) if there are records that is mutually-incompatible to main condition of WHERE. EXISTS construct doesn't need to be correlated to main query, this is valid construct: AND EXIST(SELECT 1) –  Michael Buen Apr 20 '10 at 14:33
    
I didn't mean to imply that it is order-dependant or that the construction wasn't valid SQL. What I meant was that if the first select returns any data, then the NOT EXISTS in the second and third selects will return false for every row, and no data will be returned. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 20 '10 at 15:03
    
I think what you want is SELECT Field, FieldValue FROM Tbl WHERE Culture = 'nl' and Field not in (select Field from tbl where culture = 'nl-NL'). –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 20 '10 at 15:06
    
hmm.. that's not the logic i see from the poster, the way i understood it is each culture has their own complete set of field values pairs, hence my logic seems peculiar(i.e. no correlating of tables). i will ask the poster if each culture has their own complete set of field values pairs –  Michael Buen Apr 20 '10 at 15:28

Assuming Culture is being passed in in @Culture:

select Field,COALESCE(fc.FieldValue,pc.FieldValue,dc.FieldValue)
from
    Tbl dc
        left join
    Tbl pc
        on
            dc.Field = pc.Field and
            pc.Culture = SUBSTRING(@Culture,1,CHARINDEX('-',@Culture)-1)
        left join
    Tbl fc
        on
            dc.Field = fc.Field and
            fc.Culture = @Culture
where
    dc.Culture = 'en'

will return the entire table (the aliases could be longer - dc = default culture, pc = partial culture, fc = full culture.

share|improve this answer

Given a target culture return either the complete match, or failing that a match on the parent. (Assumed to be the left 2 characters from the Culture field)

(UPDATED)

-- @TargetCulture represents the culture we are interested in
DECLARE @TargetCulture varchar(5)
SET @TargetCulture = 'nl-NL'

-- Parent represents the Result_Set (as in OP) plus column for the 'parent' culture
;WITH Parent AS
(
    SELECT 
        *, 
        LEFT(Culture, 2) AS parent
    FROM 
        Result_Set
)
SELECT 
    * 
FROM 
    Parent
WHERE
    -- Get either a full matching culture or just a match on the parent
    (@TargetCulture = Culture AND @TargetCulture <> parent)
    OR
    (@TargetCulture <> Culture AND @TargetCulture = parent)

Change the value of the @TargetCulture variable to retrieve culture data for nl, en-GB, and en.

share|improve this answer

Another method;

SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE tbl.Culture = (
 SELECT COALESCE(
  CASE WHEN EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM tbl WHERE Culture = @locale) THEN @locale ELSE NULL END,
  CASE WHEN EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM tbl WHERE Culture = SUBSTRING(@locale, 1, CHARINDEX('-', @locale + '-') - 1)) THEN SUBSTRING(@locale, 1, CHARINDEX('-', @locale + '-') - 1) ELSE NULL END,
  'en'
 )
)


nl-nl -> 'nl-nl'
en -> 'en'
en-xxx -> 'en'
zz-gg -> 'en'
en-gb -> 'en-gb'
ff -> 'en'
share|improve this answer

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