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When should one use dynamic keyword in c# 4.0?.......Any good example with dynamic keyword in c# 4.0 that explains its usage....

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Are you asking how to use it or when to use it? – SLaks Apr 20 '10 at 12:11
@Slacks both would be really helpful.. – Oscar Apr 20 '10 at 12:18

5 Answers 5

Dynamic should be used only when not using it is painful. Like in MS Office libraries. In all other cases it should be avoided as compile type checking is beneficial. Following are the good situation of using dynamic.

  1. Calling javascript method from Silverlight.
  2. COM interop.
  3. Maybe reading Xml, Json without creating custom classes.
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How about this? Something I've been looking for and was wondering why it was so hard to do without 'dynamic'.

interface ISomeData {}
class SomeActualData : ISomeData {}
class SomeOtherData : ISomeData {}

interface ISomeInterface
    void DoSomething(ISomeData data);

class SomeImplementation : ISomeInterface
    public void DoSomething(ISomeData data)
        dynamic specificData = data;
        HandleThis( specificData );
    private void HandleThis(SomeActualData data)
    { /* ... */ }
    private void HandleThis(SomeOtherData data)
    { /* ... */ }


You just have to maybe catch for the Runtime exception and handle how you want if you do not have an overloaded method that takes the concrete type.

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I've been trying to do something like this for a few days, leaving it and coming back to it. This would work very well. So yes this, to me at least, seems very hard to do without dynamic. – KDecker Aug 31 at 12:40

I've been trying to answer such questions on C# FAQ blog:

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You can check this blog entry. It provides an introduction on .Net dynamic types as well as some usage scenarios and considerations on the dangers exposed by dynamic programming.

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