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So I'm going through old code (2.0) and I came across this:

object isReviewingValue = ViewState["IsReviewing"];

if (isReviewingValue is bool)
{
  return (bool)isReviewingValue;
}

My first thought was to us the "as" keyword to avoid the unneeded

(bool)isReviewingValue;

But "as" only works with non value types. No problem, I just went ahead and did this:

bool? isReviewingValue= ViewState["IsReviewing"] as bool?;
if (isReviewingValue.HasValue)
{
  return isReviewingValue.Value;
}

Question is: Besides looking a bit more readable, is this in fact better?

EDIT:

public Stopwatch AsRun()
{
  Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();

  watch.Start();
  for (Int32 loopCounter = 0; loopCounter < 10000; loopCounter++)
  {
    Object value = true;
    Boolean? test = value as Boolean?;
    if (test.HasValue)
    {
      Boolean something = test.Value;
    }
  }
  watch.Stop();

  return watch;
}

public Stopwatch ObjectIsRun()
{
  Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();

  watch.Start();
  for (Int32 loopCounter = 0; loopCounter < 10000; loopCounter++)
  {
    Object test = true;
    if (test is Boolean)
    {
      Boolean something = (Boolean)test;
    }
  }
  watch.Stop();

  return watch;
}

Answer: Turns out that with the above methods run in a test fashion, the original code is about 10 times faster.

share|improve this question
7  
I don't understand why you are even doing this. There isn't any improvement. They contain the same number of lines of code. The second is NOT any clearer that the 1st; in fact, there's more 'noise' in the second one. I say leave the first one alone. – John Kraft Apr 20 '10 at 14:14
    
Mostly because it seems really silly to type as object, use is, then type back to boolean when bool? will take care of it for me and gives me an easy way to check if the value was boolean in the first place (HasValue). Knowing that as will convert no bool values to null seems like a more sensible choice then the whole round about string to object to bool. – Programmin Tool Apr 20 '10 at 14:48
1  
if you are using the "is-as" combination on tight loop, i suggest you read this: stackoverflow.com/questions/1583050/… – Michael Buen Apr 20 '10 at 14:53
1  
I don't believe the AsRun is actually doing any casting, I believe the compiler is optimizing out the cast, thus making it much faster. The reason is that bool? can be directly assigned a bool without cast. Try instead object test = bool; bool? test2 = test as bool?; – Erik Funkenbusch Apr 20 '10 at 15:42
1  
Also, it's not true that "as" doesn't work on value types, as bool? is a value type, it only works on nullable types, and bool? is a special kind of value type that is nullable. – Erik Funkenbusch Apr 20 '10 at 15:49
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think the first one is more readable , and it is faster as well [about 10 nanoseconds versus 100 nanoseconds, according to a test I just ran ;) (i.e. not going to slow your program down either way) ]

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. That's kind of what I was looking for. – Programmin Tool Apr 20 '10 at 14:50
    
Turns out it's about 10 times slower to do the second one, like you said. (I tested it a bit too just to double check) – Programmin Tool Apr 20 '10 at 15:58

The coalesce operator will remove some code for you. To answer your question, as Jimmy made quite clear, the technical differences between the two are minuscule so use whichever you feel is better. Personally, I am inclined to use this method. I might be considered biased though...

private bool GetIsReviewing()
{
    return (ViewState["IsReviewing"] as bool?) ?? false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Only problem is the value could be false. Wouldn't that pass back bool? instead of bool too? – Programmin Tool Apr 20 '10 at 15:22
    
@Programmin Tool - Does that clear things up a bit? – ChaosPandion Apr 20 '10 at 15:25

It's actually a little worse. If the value in "IsReviewing" is not a bool or null, your code will throw an exception. The original version will just ignore it.

share|improve this answer
1  
He just needs to add a null check in his if statement and he's good to go – juharr Apr 20 '10 at 13:49
    
-1. isReviewingValue.HasValue is a null check. – Jimmy Apr 20 '10 at 13:52
1  
Which exception? – ANeves Apr 20 '10 at 14:00
    
A null reference exception or an invalid cast exception. This isn't Java, you don't specify all potential exceptions... – cjk Apr 20 '10 at 14:20
    
@ck: the point is that isReviewingValue.HasValue doesn't throw an exception (it returns false) when isReviewingValue == null. – Jimmy Apr 20 '10 at 14:21

Second is better, because if ViewState["IsReviewing"] is not a bool, as keyword automaticaly set this to null. In first option you implement it self, you can dont do that. And result have in good container.

share|improve this answer

If in the first example you returned null otherwise, why not to use this:

bool? MyMethod()
{
  return ViewState["IsReviewing"] as bool?;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will not compile. The as operator can only be used with nullable types. – ChaosPandion Apr 20 '10 at 14:23
    
Missed the '?' of course. – n535 Apr 20 '10 at 14:25
    
Down-vote removed :) – ChaosPandion Apr 20 '10 at 14:25

You could use a generic extension method approach to add syntactic sugar:

public static class TypecastExtensions {
   public static T CastOrDefault<T>(this object o) where T : struct  {
      return o as Nullable<T> ?? default(T);
   }

   public static T CastOrDefault<T>(this object o, T defaultValue) where T : struct {
      return o as Nullable<T> ?? defaultValue;
   }
}

Usage:

bool isReviewingValue = ViewState["IsReviewing"].CastOrDefault<bool>();
share|improve this answer

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