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currently i have a database of music that i have db'd in mysql, now i am writing a php frontend for it, and it will list out everything in a table, it works, but if i search "the beatles" it gives me 453 results(correct) however if i just search "beatles" it results in 0 rows, how would i go about making it able to search for something like that?

heres my current line:

$query2 = "SELECT * From `songs` WHERE `Artist` like '".$_REQUEST['q']."'
   OR `Album` like '".$_REQUEST['q']."' OR `Genre` like '".$_REQUEST['q']."'
       OR `Title` like '".$_REQUEST['q']."';";

EDIT Reformatted query by @Yacoby

 $query2 = "SELECT * "
         . "From `songs` "
         . "WHERE `Artist` like '".$_REQUEST['q']."' "
         .   "OR `Album` like '".$_REQUEST['q']."' "
         .   "OR `Genre` like '".$_REQUEST['q']."' "
         .   "OR `Title` like '".$_REQUEST['q']."';";
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1  
please remember to use mysql_real_escape_string to sanitize user input: php.net/manual/en/function.mysql-real-escape-string.php –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Apr 20 '10 at 16:22

4 Answers 4

Throw a % before and after the search term, in the quotes:

WHERE Artist like '%".$_REQUEST['q']."%'

That will search for [anything]beatles[anything]

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thanks much, that seemd to help with that situation, i might need to do some more parsing, i forgot to add that above that, i am escaping the info by doing $_REQUEST['q'] = mysql_real_escape_string($_REQUEST['q']); –  Bill Parson Apr 20 '10 at 16:25
    
Obviously, throw the % around each search string. Or, in your example there, do $_REQUEST['q'] = '%' . mysql_real_escape_string($_REQUEST['q']) . '%'; –  hookedonwinter Apr 20 '10 at 16:26

You may want to consider parsing your user's input and cleaning it up. Get rid of words like "the" and just use important words in the query like "beatles".

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Also store the record as "Beatles, The", and just do a search LIKE 'BEATLES%'. –  Marcus Adams Apr 20 '10 at 16:28

A LIKE query allows you to use SQL wildcards (% and _). Otherwise it acts exactly as if you were using a regular 'equals' comparison:

SELECT .... WHERE somefield LIKE 'beatles';
SELECT .... WHERE somefield='beatles';

act exactly the same, whereas

SELECT .... WHERE somefield LIKE 'beatles%';

finds any record where somefield starts with 'beatles', and

SELECT .... WHERE somefield='beatles%';

will find only records that contain the literal string 'beatles%' (and note that the % isn't being treated as a wildcard).

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You need to protect against SQL injections. What if someone enters:

'; DROP DATABASE music; --

or something similar?

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