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I need to do a date comparison in Mysql without taking into account the time component i.e. i need to convert '2008-11-05 14:30:00' to '2008-11-05'

Currently i am doing this:

SELECT from_days(to_days(my_date))

Is there a proper way of doing this?

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up vote 61 down vote accepted

Yes, use the date function:

SELECT date(my_date)
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In PostgreSQL you use the TRUNC() function, but I'm not seeing it for MySQL. From my brief Googling, it looks like you'll need to cast your DATETIME value to be just DATE.

date_col = CAST(NOW() AS DATE)

See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/date-and-time-types.html

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1  
date_trunc() (not trunc()) wouldn't actually remove the time part in Postgres. It would merely set it to 00:00:00 which is something different. – a_horse_with_no_name May 6 '13 at 21:01

select date(somedate) is the most common.

If you need to accommodate other formats, you can use:

SELECT DATE_FORMAT('2009-10-04 22:23:00', '%Y-%m-%d');
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The DATE_FORMAT is very useful for extracting the year component only for example. Thank you. – Mario Awad Sep 20 '12 at 9:21

Just a simple way of doing it date("d F Y",strtotime($row['date'])) where $row['date'] comes from your query

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You could use ToShortDateString();

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Isn't that a C# function? The question is after a MySQL solution – andrewsi Sep 25 '12 at 21:12
    
It's C# and actually it does not remove the timestamp: Converts the value of the current DateTime object to its equivalent short date string representation. – Katcha Dec 4 '14 at 14:11

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