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I'm trying to create more useful debug messages for my class where store data. My code is looking something like this

#include <QAbstractTableModel>
#include <QDebug>

/**
  * Model for storing data. 
  */
class DataModel : public QAbstractTableModel {
    // for debugging purposes
    friend QDebug operator<< (QDebug d, const DataModel &model);

    //other stuff
};

/**
  * Overloading operator for debugging purposes
  */
QDebug operator<< (QDebug d, const DataModel &model) {
    d << "Hello world!";
    return d;
}

I expect qDebug() << model will print "Hello world!". However, there is alway something like "QAbstractTableModel(0x1c7e520)" on the output.

Do you have any idea what's wrong?

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3  
1. it looks like Qt wants the stream operator to be: QDebug operator<<(QDebug dbg, const DataModel &model) [namely returning & passing QDebug by value], see doc.trolltech.com/4.6/… 2. you have declared it like: friend QDebug & operator<< (const QDebug &d, DataModel model); but defined it withouth the const: QDebug & operator<< (QDebug &d, DataModel model) [althought it's probably just a copy/paste error - your code it shouldn't link] –  Eugen Constantin Dinca Apr 20 '10 at 18:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

After an hour of playing with this question I figured out model is pointer to DataModel and my operator << takes only references.

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10  
Only an hour - you're lucky ! –  Martin Beckett Apr 20 '10 at 19:07

In your example, qDebug() prints the address of your variable, which is the default behavior for unknown types.

In fact, there seem to be two things you have to take care of:

  • Get the item by value (and eugen already pointed it out!).
  • Define the overloading operator before you use it, put its signature in the header file, or define it as forward before using it (otherwise you will get the default "qDebug() <<" behavior).

This will give you:

QDebug operator<< (QDebug d, const DataModel &model) {
    d << "Hello world!";
    return d;
}
DataModel m;
qDebug() << "m" << m;

or

QDebug operator<< (QDebug d, const DataModel &model);

DataModel m;
qDebug() << "m" << m;

QDebug operator<< (QDebug d, const DataModel &model) {
    d << "Hello world!";
    return d;
}

I've learned it the hard way, too...

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