Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
    SELECT AVG(`col5`)
    FROM `table1`
    WHERE `id` NOT IN (
        SELECT `id` FROM `table2`
        WHERE `col4` = 5
    )
    group by `col2` having sum(`col3`) > 0
UNION
    SELECT MAX(`col5`)
    FROM `table1`
    WHERE `id` NOT IN (
        SELECT `id` FROM `table2`
        WHERE `col4` = 5
    )
    group by `col2` having sum(`col3`) = 0

For readability and performance reasons, I think this code could be refactored. But how?

EDITIONS

  1. removed the outer select

  2. made the first select to return a sum and the second one to return another value

  3. replaced the SUM by AVG

share|improve this question
    
I'm confused because you have GROUP BY, but no aggregate columns in the SELECT. What columns are you returning? –  Marcus Adams Apr 20 '10 at 19:43
    
@Marcus I corrected the example to reflect the real reason why there is a union –  Jader Dias Apr 20 '10 at 20:26
    
You don't need UNION anyway. Consider using IF function. See my answer below updated. –  codeholic Apr 21 '10 at 22:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
SELECT * 
FROM table1 t1
left outer join table2 t2 on t1.id = t2.id and t2.col4 = 5
where t2.id is null
group by t1.col2 
having sum(col3) >= 0 

The outer select is missing the FROM clause and was not adding anything so I removed it. The NOT IN is inefficient compared to the LEFT OUTER JOIN method so I replaced that. The two UNIONs were easily combined into one by using >=.

Update: Note the use of UNION ALL rather than UNION. I don't think you want to remove duplicates, and it will perform faster this way.

SELECT AVG(t1.col5) 
FROM table1 t1 
left outer join table2 t2 on t1.id = t2.id and t2.col4 = 5 
where t2.id is null 
group by t1.col2  
having sum(t1.col3) > 0  
UNION ALL
SELECT MAX(t1.col5) 
FROM table1 t1 
left outer join table2 t2 on t1.id = t2.id and t2.col4 = 5 
where t2.id is null 
group by t1.col2  
having sum(t1.col3) = 0  
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestions: I removed the outer select, I can use your left outer join suggestion, but I can't combine the UNION because the code is slightly different from what I wrote first. I rewrote the question to show why it is difficult to combine both statements. –  Jader Dias Apr 20 '10 at 20:29
    
Ok, no problem. I'll post the solution in a moment. –  RedFilter Apr 20 '10 at 20:30
    
You're right, SUM and MAX don't mix well. The real operations I use are AVG and MAX. I edited the question to reflect this. –  Jader Dias Apr 20 '10 at 20:40
    
Note I used UNION ALL, not UNION, for better performance; updated query to use AVG. –  RedFilter Apr 20 '10 at 21:10
SELECT t1.* FROM table1 t1 LEFT OUTER JOIN table2 t2 ON t1.id = t2.id 
WHERE t2.col4 <> 5 AND SUM(t1.col3) > 0 GROUP BY t1.col2
share|improve this answer
    
the real code is slightly different from what I wrote at first. I rewrote the question to show why it is difficult to combine both statements –  Jader Dias Apr 20 '10 at 20:33

I'm guessing that you want this:

SELECT * FROM `table`
WHERE col2 IN
(SELECT col2
    FROM `table1` 
    WHERE `id` NOT IN ( 
        SELECT `id` FROM `table2` 
        WHERE `col4` = 5 
    ) 
    group by `col2` having sum(`col3`) >= 0
)

When using GROUP BY, you should only return columns that are named in the GROUP BY clause or that include an aggregate function. Therefore, the inner SELECT here gets the col2 values where the sum is greater than or equal to zero, then the outer SELECT grabs the entire row for those values.

share|improve this answer
SELECT
    IF(SUM(`table1`.`col3`) > 0, AVG(`table1`.`col5`), MAX(`table1`.`col5`))
FROM `table1`
    LEFT JOIN `table2` ON `table2`.`id` = `table1`.`id` AND `table2`.`col4` = 5
WHERE `table2`.`id` IS NULL
GROUP BY `table1`.`col2`
HAVING SUM(`table1`.`col3`) >= 0

Also * is considered harmful. If you want to make your query forward-compatible with possible future changes to your DB model, specify columns by their names.

share|improve this answer
    
the real code is slightly different from what I wrote at first. I rewrote the question to show why it is difficult to combine both statements –  Jader Dias Apr 20 '10 at 20:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.