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Attached is a classic Decorator pattern. My question is how would you modify the below code so that you can wrap zero or one of each topping on to the Pizza

Right now I can have a Pepporini -> Sausage --> Pepporini --> Pizza class driving the total cost up to $10, charging twice for Pepporini.

I don't think I want to use the Chain of Responsibility pattern as order does not matter and not all toppings are used?

Thank you

namespace PizzaDecorator
{
public interface IPizza
{
    double CalculateCost();
}

public class Pizza: IPizza
{
    public Pizza()
    {
    }

    public double CalculateCost()
    {
        return 8.00;
    }

}

public abstract class Topping : IPizza
{
    protected IPizza _pizzaItem;

    public Topping(IPizza pizzaItem)
    {
        this._pizzaItem = pizzaItem;
    }

    public abstract double CalculateCost();

}

public class Pepporini : Topping
{
    public Pepporini(IPizza pizzaItem)
        : base(pizzaItem) 
    {   
    }

    public override  double CalculateCost()
    {
        return this._pizzaItem.CalculateCost() + 0.50;
    }


}

public class Sausage : Topping
{
    public Sausage(IPizza pizzaItem)
        : base(pizzaItem)
    {
    }


    public override double CalculateCost()
    {
        return this._pizzaItem.CalculateCost() + 1.00;
    }
}

public class Onions : Topping
{
    public Onions(IPizza pizzaItem)
        : base(pizzaItem)
    {
    }

    public override double CalculateCost()
    {
        return this._pizzaItem.CalculateCost() + .25;
    }  
}
}
share|improve this question
    
Homework by any chance? –  womp Apr 20 '10 at 20:56
    
No, granted I hid the "real" application, for the sake of my work but this is more than homework, this actually brings in money :) –  Mike Apr 20 '10 at 21:01
    
When you begin thinking in patterns, it is an indication that you're overdoing it. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 20 '10 at 21:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would create a Topping class which would have a price and make your Pizza class support multiple toppings. Then just calculate the price based on each topping added e.g.

public interface IPizza
{
    double CalculateCost();
}

public class Pizza : IPizza
{
    private List<Topping> toppings = new List<Topping>();
    private double stdCost;

    public Pizza(double cost)
    {
        // this would be the standard cost of the pizza (before any toppings have been added)
        stdCost = cost;
    }

    public Pizza(IList<Topping> toppings)
    {
        this.toppings.AddRange(toppings);
    }

    public void AddTopping(Topping topping)
    {
        this.toppings.Add(topping);
    }

    public void RemoveTopping(Topping topping)
    {
        this.toppings.Remove(topping);
    }

    public double CalculateCost()
    {
        var total = stdCost;
        foreach (var t in toppings)
        {
            total += t.Price;
        }
    }
}

public class Topping
{
    public Topping(string description, double price)
    {
        Description = description;
        Price = price;
    }

    public double Price { get; private set; }
    public string Description { get; private set; }
}

Usage

IPizza p = new Pizza(5.00);
p.AddTopping(new Topping("Pepperoni", 0.50));
p.AddTopping(new Topping("Sausage", 0.50));
var charge = p.CalculateCost(); // charge = 6.00
share|improve this answer
    
This was what I would suggest. Very logical to me in the Pizza context. –  Robb Apr 20 '10 at 21:17
    
Mike stated he "hid the real application," so presumably he actually needs separate, more complex logic for each "topping" than just a price. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 20 '10 at 21:21
    
@BlueRaja: I think what Mike was meaning from hid the real application he was referring to not supplying a real code sample. He was using Pizza/Topping relationship instead. –  James Apr 20 '10 at 21:26

I would not use decorator pattern for this situation. instead, I'd have pizza hold a set of ITopping:

public interface ITopping {
    double cost();
}

the set will guarantee no duplications. now, to calculate the cost of a pizza you'll add it's base price to the sum over all toppings cost

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I was going to suggest the same thing, Toppings are not IPizzas, and should be referenced by h a Pizza, not the other way around. (It is possible this was simply due to Mike's "hiding of the real application," in which case, we'd need to see the real class hierarchy to help you any further). –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 20 '10 at 21:10
    
What would be the purpose of ITopping? I don't really see the need for the above design to sub class Topping at all. I think a simple Topping class that contains a price/description would suffce. –  James Apr 20 '10 at 21:17

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