Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For instance, I am setting an interval like

timer = setInterval(fncName, 1000);

and if i go and do

clearInterval(timer);

it does clear the interval but is there a way to check that it cleared the interval? I've tried getting the value of it while it has an interval and when it doesn't but they both just seem to be numbers.

share|improve this question
1  
it does work (clearing it) - so I'm not sure why you need to inspect it? –  scunliffe Apr 20 '10 at 22:28
1  
id just like to know if there is an interval waiting at any specific time. –  chadley Apr 20 '10 at 22:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 34 down vote accepted

There is no direct way to do what you are looking for. Instead, you could set timer to false every time you call clearInterval:

// Start timer
var timer = setInterval(fncName, 1000);

// End timer
clearInterval(timer);
timer = false;

Now, timer will either be false or have a value at a given time, so you can simply check with

if (timer)
    ...

If you want to encapsulate this in a class, it's trivial:

function Interval(fn, time) {
    var timer = false;
    this.start = function () {
        if (!this.isRunning())
            timer = setInterval(fn, time);
    };
    this.stop = function () {
        clearInterval(timer);
        timer = false;
    };
    this.isRunning = function () {
        return timer !== false;
    };
}

var i = new Interval(fncName, 1000);
i.start();

if (i.isRunning())
    // ...

i.stop();
share|improve this answer
1  
this is what i planned to do if no was the answer to my question. i wrote something similar: var stopInterval = function(varname) { clearInterval(); varname = false; } var isRunning = function(varname) { return !!varname; } i know this exactly wont work because varname will probably be a string, thus making it always true, but its the idea that works for me. your way would work as well but people beware that setInterval() gives the var a numeric value and if it could come out as 1 or 0 meaning t/f. –  chadley Apr 20 '10 at 22:55
1  
eh, i guess formatting doesnt work in comments... my bad. does anyone know how to format code in a comment or is that just not allowed at all? –  chadley Apr 20 '10 at 23:01
3  
Use if (timer !== false) to avoid the numeric problem. (Count the equal signs) –  yankee Feb 7 '11 at 17:26
    
@yankee I want to be able to start a timer only if it has been cleared and is not running anymore, if(!timer) works great but I can't get the same result with if(timer != true) or if(timer !== true) –  baptx May 21 '12 at 22:11
2  
@baptx: Well yes, the way you are looking at things you need to check if timer is a boolean false (like Casey Chu says). That is not the same as checking whether it is not a boolean true (timer === false) != (timer !== true). I changed your code: jsfiddle.net/RHeZN/12 Now it's more failsafe. –  yankee May 22 '12 at 14:10

The return values from setTimeout and setInterval are completely opaque values. You can't derive any meaning from them; the only use for them is to pass back to clearTimeout and clearInterval.

There is no function to test whether a value corresponds to an active timeout/interval, sorry! If you wanted a timer whose status you could check, you'd have to create your own wrapper functions that remembered what the set/clear state was.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your confirmation –  chadley Apr 20 '10 at 22:58

You COULD override the setInterval method and add the capability to keep track of your intervals. Here is an untestet example to outline the idea. It will work on the current window only (if you have multiple, you could change this with the help of the prototype object) and this will only work if you override the functions BEFORE any functions that you care of keeping track about are registered:

var oldSetInterval = window.setInterval;
var oldClearInterval = window.clearInterval;
window.setInterval = function(func, time)
{
  var id = oldSetInterval(func, time);
  window.intervals.push(id);
  return id;
}
window.intervals = [];
window.clearInterval = function(id)
{
  for(int i = 0; i < window.setInterval.intervals; ++i)
    if (window.setInterval.intervals[i] == id)
    {
      window.setInterval.intervals.splice(i, 1);
    }
  oldClearInterval(id);
}
window.isIntervalRegistered(id)
{
  for(int i = 0; i < window.setInterval.intervals; ++i)
    if (window.setInterval.intervals[i] == func)
      return true;
  return false;
}



var i = 0;
var refreshLoop = setInterval(function(){
    i++;
}, 250);

if (isIntervalRegistered(refrshLoop)) alert('still registered');
else alert('not registered');
clearInterval(refreshLoop);
if (isIntervalRegistered(refrshLoop)) alert('still registered');
else alert('not registered');
share|improve this answer

The solution to this problem: Create a global counter that is incremented within your code performed by setInterval. Then before you recall setInterval, test if the counter is STILL incrementing. If so, your setInterval is still active. If not, you're good to go.

share|improve this answer

Lots of complicated answers above, this method works just fine for me:

if (typeof timer == 'undefined')
{
    //timer has been cleared
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I was scrolling down through all these complicated answers thinking the exact same thing. I was about to post the same answer you have here. No need to overcomplicate things, people! –  Jeremy Moritz Sep 11 '13 at 20:55
2  
This isn't correct. At least not in the newer versions of Chrome. I know this is old but thought I would post. var test = setInterval(function () { console.log('ran'); });, typeof test // returns "number", clearInterval(test);, typeof test // returns "number". This shows that the variable is not set to undefined when cleared. –  PJH Feb 14 at 13:22
    
okay, so just ensure it gets set as undefined when timer is cleared with test = clearInterval(test); –  shazbot Feb 26 at 14:12

I did this like below, My problem was solved. you should set the value like "false", when you clearTimeout the timer.

var timeer=false;
----
----
if(timeer==false)
{
  starttimer();  
}
-----
-----
function starttimer()
{
  timeer=setInterval(activefunction, 1000); 
}

function pausetimer()
{
  clearTimeout(timeer);
  timeer=false;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.