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 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>
 typedef struct aluno{
                 char cabecalho[60];
                 char info[100];
                 int n_alunos;
                 char dados[100];
                 char curso[100];
                 int numero;
                 char nome[100];
                 char e_mail[100];
                 int n_disciplinas;
                 int nota;
                 }ALUNO;

void cabclh(ALUNO alunos[],int a){
   FILE *fp;
   int i;
   for(i=0;i<100;i++){
      fp=fopen("trabalho.txt","r");

       if(fp==NULL){
           printf("Erro ao abrir o ficheiro\n");
       }
       while(!feof(fp)){
           fgets(alunos[i].cabecalho,60,fp);
           printf("%s\n",alunos[i].cabecalho);
       }
    }
    fclose(fp);
}

what is wrong here?

main:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){    
   ALUNO alunos[100];  
   int aluno;  
   int b;

   cabclh(aluno,b);

   system("PAUSE"); 
   return 0
share|improve this question
    
How do you know there's something wrong? Did the compiler give an error? Also, is this is homework? –  Javier Badia Apr 21 '10 at 1:24
1  
Please explain your issue before the snippet, You're unlikely to get an answer the way you've presented this question, especially with only 1 rep point. It's also in a different language. –  Joseph Silvashy Apr 21 '10 at 1:26
    
Pedro, by fixing your indentation I think there's an obvious problem, it's unclear if it's a typo or a legitimate problem because you're not providing adequate explanation of what the expected and observed behavior is... –  Mark Elliot Apr 21 '10 at 1:30
    
i want to open what is write in trabalho.txt –  Pedro Apr 21 '10 at 1:33
    
@Javier, it might be worthwhile to read meta.stackexchange.com/questions/34503/… –  Mark Elliot Apr 21 '10 at 1:34

6 Answers 6

Quite a few issues here.

The first parameter passed to cabclh is of the wrong type:

void cabclh(ALUNO alunos[],int a);
: :
int aluno;
cabclh(aluno,b);

You should probably exit the function (or some other error handling) if you can't open the file:

if (fp==NULL){
    printf("Erro ao abrir o ficheiro\n");
    return; // <- Added
}

There's no need to open the file a hundred times. If a regular file doesn't open the first time, it probably won't open at all (although there are cases where this may happen). This particular segment will result in wasted file handles:

for(i=0;i<100;i++){
   fp=fopen("trabalho.txt","r");
}

In addition it will reset the file pointer to the start of the file each time.


If your intent is to read up to 100 items from that file for storage into your array, I would suggest you start with:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct aluno{
    char cabecalho[60];
    char info[100];
    int n_alunos;
    char dados[100];
    char curso[100];
    int numero;
    char nome[100];
    char e_mail[100];
    int n_disciplinas;
    int nota;
} ALUNO;

void cabclh (ALUNO alunos[]) {
    FILE *fp;
    int i;

    // Initialise all elements to indicate no data.

    for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        alunos[i].cabecalho[0] = '\0';

    // Open the file, returning if not there.

    fp = fopen ("trabalho.txt","r");
    if (fp == NULL) {
        printf("Erro ao abrir o ficheiro\n");
        return;
    }

    // Only allow up to 100 elements.

    for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        // Only read and load if more to go.

        if (!feof(fp)) {
            // Read the line and strip off newline character.

            fgets (alunos[i].cabecalho,60,fp);
            if (alunos[i].cabecalho[strlen(alunos[i].cabecalho)-1] == '\n')
                alunos[i].cabecalho[strlen(alunos[i].cabecalho)-1] = '\0';
            printf ("%s\n", alunos[i].cabecalho);
        }
    }

    // Close the file.

    fclose (fp);
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    ALUNO alunos[100];

    cabclh(alunos);

    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

It successfully reads a test file I created. Now it may be that your input file is more complicated that just 100 strings to be loaded into cabecelho but the code above is a good start, showing the controlling logic. Ad different line format would only change the way each line is read, not the loop around it.

And, if you want to be able to handle arbitrary numbers of lines, I would move away from arrays to more expandable data structures. But, for a first attempt, you're making the right choice keeping it simple.

share|improve this answer
    
all fixed, but appears in the console "<null>", and then crash –  Pedro Apr 21 '10 at 1:47
    
Can fgets return a string of length zero? If so, you'd need to check that before using strlen(...) - 1 as an index. –  James McNellis Apr 21 '10 at 2:01
    
@James, not for a normal line, no. It will always have a newline. You may get a zero-length strings on an error condition but I prefer not to clog up educational code to the point where it's 80% error checking :-) The intent here is to teach how the code for normal cases can work, error checking (while vital to have in robust code) would only complicate that at this stage (IMNSHO). –  paxdiablo Apr 21 '10 at 2:10
    
Try the new code, @Pedro, it's tested successfully. –  paxdiablo Apr 21 '10 at 2:13
    
Tested!! Working fine xD... but why the cicle "for"? why it needs to run 100 times –  Pedro Apr 22 '10 at 10:40

It looks like you're opening the file 100 times, then using a while loop with [i] that's never changing. i = 100 because it's never changed inside your while loop.

share|improve this answer
    
There also seems to be an extra closing brace. –  Javier Badia Apr 21 '10 at 1:27
    
That seems to be more of an indent problem, guys. The whole thing is inside the for statement including, erroneously, the fopen. –  paxdiablo Apr 21 '10 at 2:12
    
@paxdiablo it is now, it wasn't before. –  John Boker Apr 21 '10 at 13:09

I see at least one thing wrong:

char cabecalho[60];

// ... and later ...

fgets(alunos[i].cabecalho,100,fp);

Last I checked, 100 is bigger than 60, so you have a buffer overflow error.

share|improve this answer
    
steals the same –  Pedro Apr 21 '10 at 1:29

I don't understand why are you doing an fopen 100 times:

for(i=0;i<100;i++){
 fp=fopen("trabalho.txt","r");
 }

Just do:

 fp=fopen("trabalho.txt","r");
share|improve this answer

Besides all the other errors, you have an extra brace above the fclose(fp), which is likely causing a compilation issue due to unmatched braces.

share|improve this answer
void cabclh(ALUNO alunos[],int a){
   FILE *fp;
   int i=0;

   fp=fopen("trabalho.txt","r");

   if(fp==NULL){
       printf("Erro ao abrir o ficheiro\n");
       return;     
   }
   while(!feof(fp) && i<100){
       fgets(alunos[i].cabecalho,60,fp);
       printf("%s\n",alunos[i++].cabecalho);
   }

fclose(fp);
}
share|improve this answer
    
on the console appears "<null>" –  Pedro Apr 21 '10 at 1:43

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