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There is a lot of information on how to find the next power of 2 of a given value (see refs) but I cannot find any to get the previous power of two.

The only way I find so far is to keep a table with all power of two up to 2^64 and make a simple lookup.

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13  
Get the next power of 2, and divide by 2...? –  GManNickG Apr 21 '10 at 1:52
1  
Binary shift? Divide? –  Anthony Pegram Apr 21 '10 at 1:53
1  
Get the next one, divide by 2. –  N 1.1 Apr 21 '10 at 1:53
3  
He's asking for the power of two that's closest to a given value (and less than, not greater than the given value) –  Michael Haren Apr 21 '10 at 1:54
5  
clear all but the most significant bit. it is a general recipe, you can implemented in multiple ways –  Anycorn Apr 21 '10 at 1:55

10 Answers 10

From Hacker's Delight, a nice branchless solution:

uint32_t flp2 (uint32_t x)
{
    x = x | (x >> 1);
    x = x | (x >> 2);
    x = x | (x >> 4);
    x = x | (x >> 8);
    x = x | (x >> 16);
    return x - (x >> 1);
}

This typically takes 12 instructions. You can do it in fewer if your CPU has a "count leading zeroes" instruction.

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This line [ x = x | (x >> 5) ] should be [ x = x | (x >> 8) ] –  Horacio Apr 21 '10 at 14:33
    
@Horacio: good catch - I'll fix that. –  Paul R Apr 21 '10 at 16:16
1  
I love that book! –  GWW Oct 18 '10 at 16:54
    
@GWW: me too - it's definitely in my top 10 programming books of all time. –  Paul R Oct 18 '10 at 17:42
1  
FWIW, this is significantly faster than the bsr solution for AMD CPUs, 3-4x faster for 32-bit version and 1.5-2x for 64-bit version. I've heard it's the opposite for Intel but I do not have access to their CPUs to test. –  Rusty Shackleford Jun 4 at 4:10

many people answer my questions, so me will answer yours (hopefully it's right):

probably most simple (for positive numbers):

// find next ( must be greater) power, and go one back
p = 1; while (p <= n) p <<= 1; p >>= 1;

you can make variations in many many ways if you want to optimize.

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If you can get the next-higher power of 2, the next-lower power of 2 is either that next-higher or half that. It depends on what you consider to be the "next higher" for any power of 2 (and what you consider to be the next-lower power of 2).

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uint32_t previous_power_of_two( uint32_t x ) {
    if (x == 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    // x--; Uncomment this, if you want a strictly less than 'x' result.
    x |= (x >> 1);
    x |= (x >> 2);
    x |= (x >> 4);
    x |= (x >> 8);
    x |= (x >> 16);
    return x - (x >> 1);
}

Thanks for the responses. I will try to sum them up and explain a little bit clearer. What this algorithm does is changing to 'ones' all bits after the first 'one' bit, cause these are the only bits that can make our 'x' larger than its previous power of two. After making sure they are 'ones', it just removes them, leaving the first 'one' bit intact. That single bit in its place is our previous power of two.

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What about

if (tt = v >> 16)
{
   r = (t = tt >> 8) ? 0x1000000 * Table256[t] : 0x10000 * Table256[tt];
}
else 
{
  r = (t = v >> 8) ? 0x100 * Table256[t] : Table256[v];
}

It is just modified method from http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#IntegerLogLookup. This require like 7 operations and it might be faster to replace multiplications whit shift.

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Here is a one liner for posterity (ruby):

2**Math.log(input, 2).round(0)
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Using floating point maths for this is serious overkill. –  Paul R Feb 2 at 9:54

When you work in base 2, you can jump from a power of two to the next one by just adding or removing a digit from the right.

For instance, the previous power of two of the number 8 is the number 4. In binary:

01000 -> 0100 (we remove the trailing zero to get number 4)

So the algorithm to solve the calculus of the previous power of two is:

previousPower := number shr 1

previousPower = number >> 1

(or any other syntax)

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1  
This is only true if number is also a power of 2. If number is say 11, then this wont work. –  Matt Greer Jan 11 '11 at 19:19

This can be done in one line.

int nextLowerPowerOf2 = i <= 0
                        ? 0
                        : ((i & (~i + 1)) == i)
                            ? i >> 1
                            : (1 << (int)Math.Log(i, 2));

result

i    power_of_2
-2    0
-1    0
0    0
1    0
2    1
3    2
4    2
5    4
6    4
7    4
8    4
9    8

Here's a more readable version in c#, with the <=0 guard clause distributed to the utility methods.

int nextLowerPowerOf2 = IsPowerOfTwo(i) 
    ? i >> 1 // shift it right
    : GetPowerOfTwoLessThanOrEqualTo(i);

public static int GetPowerOfTwoLessThanOrEqualTo(int x)
{
    return (x <= 0 ? 0 : (1 << (int)Math.Log(x, 2)));
}

public static bool IsPowerOfTwo(int x)
{
    return (((x & (~x + 1)) == x) && (x > 0));
}
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Using floating point maths for this is serious overkill. –  Paul R Feb 2 at 9:53

Try this: ~((x + ~x)>>1) It's short, and really easy.

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1  
(-1) And how does it calculate the previous power of two for x? IMO it will set the highest available bit to 1, that's it. –  Alexey Kukanov May 22 '11 at 19:58
    
yes, it exactly does that, setting the highest available bit to 1 and others to 0, isn't that the previous power of 2 for that x,? –  TarunG May 22 '11 at 22:17
    
Please correct me here if i am wrong, take this example let the no. be 33(B: 10001), the above operation will produce 10000. –  TarunG May 22 '11 at 22:19
1  
It would if 33 was stored in exactly 5 bits (and in general, arbitrary values would consume just as many bits as required to carry all 1's). Maybe in some language it is, or bitwise operations are defined as if it was, but at least in C and C++ it will be a value of an integral type and will likely have a 8, 16, 32, or 64 bit representation. –  Alexey Kukanov May 22 '11 at 22:28
    
Oh, Sorry, I overlooked that.. –  TarunG May 22 '11 at 22:33
up vote -4 down vote accepted

This is my current solution to find the next and previous powers of two of any given positive integer n and also a small function to determine if a number is power of two.

This implementation is for Ruby.

class Integer

  def power_of_two?
    (self & (self - 1) == 0)
  end

  def next_power_of_two
    return 1 if self <= 0
    val = self
    val = val - 1
    val = (val >> 1) | val
    val = (val >> 2) | val
    val = (val >> 4) | val
    val = (val >> 8) | val
    val = (val >> 16) | val
    val = (val >> 32) | val if self.class == Bignum
    val = val + 1
  end

  def prev_power_of_two
   return 1 if self <= 0
   val = self
   val = val - 1
   val = (val >> 1) | val
   val = (val >> 2) | val
   val = (val >> 4) | val
   val = (val >> 8) | val
   val = (val >> 16) | val
   val = (val >> 32) | val if self.class == Bignum
   val = val - (val >> 1)
  end
end

Example use:

10.power_of_two? => false
16.power_of_two? => true
10.next_power_of_two => 16
10.prev_power_of_two => 8

For the previous power of two, finding the next and dividing by two is slightly slower than the method above.

I am not sure how it works with Bignums.

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2  
Hey, etiquette has it that you should have awarded the answer to the guy who gave you the idea in the first place. I think it is bad form to award yourself the right answer in this case. –  asoundmove Feb 5 '11 at 5:36
    
Do the marked answer gives something to the poster? I thought the marked answer should be the most useful to others with the same question. This one summarizes the whole discussion in a single easy to understand answer. –  Horacio Mar 26 '13 at 5:15

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