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Take the following function:

DataTable go()
{
  return someTableAdapter.getSomeData();
}

When I set a breakpoint in this function, is there a possibility to inspect the returned value? The "go" function is directly coupled to a datagrid in an aspx page.

The only way to inspect the returned datatable, is to use a temporary variable... However, that's a bit inconvenient. Isn't there another way?

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13  
I would love to see this feature! –  orip Jul 26 '10 at 13:29
1  
You can add a watch if you move back up the call stack –  Chris S Sep 6 '10 at 14:42
    
You used to be able to do this in VB6, I seem to remember. But back then the syntax for functions involved setting the function's value to the return value... –  Neil Barnwell Oct 25 '10 at 12:19
4  
9  

17 Answers 17

up vote 62 down vote accepted

Not that I know of. Note that if you do add a variable, it will get removed by the compiler in release builds anyway...

This function has been added to VS2013 where you are able to see all the return values in the autos window (only limited support for structs) or by using $ReturnValue in the immediate window.

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2  
Nice comment, but not an answer ;-) –  doekman Jun 6 '10 at 16:49
39  
@doekman - I disagree; it is an answer (and AFAIK it is the answer) - it simply isn't what you wanted to hear. –  Marc Gravell Jun 6 '10 at 19:06
7  
The reason to forgo the temp is readability & style, not efficiency, no? –  orip Jul 26 '10 at 13:29
7  
It is possible since VS 2010 with IntelliTrace: blogs.msdn.com/b/habibh/archive/2009/10/23/… –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 28 '12 at 12:53
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Intellitrace is just available in VS Ultimate Edition. –  JMGH Jan 23 at 20:56

This can be done in Visual Studio 2013 with CLR 4.5.1 according to the customer feedback site. It was not available in previous versions for C#.

(VS2008 and earlier supported it for VB.NET. It has always been available to C/C++ developers.)

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1  
How do you do this in Visual Studio 2010 C++? –  User Sep 19 '11 at 13:05
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Yes, please do tell as I have just googled for this feature and would love to know. –  graham.reeds May 17 '12 at 13:27
    
Microsoft Connect says there is a fundamental issue with managed code that prevents implementing this in a reliable manner: –  Dan Solovay Jun 17 '12 at 14:28
    
@DanSolovay The words they use are "we couldn't do the right thing consistently" (for VS11) but they "want to bring this back" and "are looking at a number potential solutions to this problem". –  Alex Angas Jun 21 '12 at 2:22
1  
It is possible since VS 2010 with IntelliTrace: blogs.msdn.com/b/habibh/archive/2009/10/23/… –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 28 '12 at 12:54

I agree that this is a very useful thing to have: not only seeing the return value of the method before stepping out of it, but also seeing the return value of methods I just stepped over. I implemented it as part of a commercial extension to Visual Studio called "BugAid" that I am making with a friend, currently in beta.

With it, you can view method return values right on the code editor, as sort of a HUD-display, like in this screenshot:

Statement Visualization

For more information, please see my blog post about this feature.

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According to Microsoft, there is no way to implement this reliably with managed code. This is a problem they are aware of and are working on:

For those out there who have experience debugging native C++ or VB6 code, you may have used a feature where function return values are provided for you in the Autos window. Unfortunately, this functionality does not exist for managed code. While you can work around this issue by assigning the return values to a local variable, this is not as convenient because it requires modifying your code. In managed code, it’s a lot trickier to determine what the return value of a function you’ve stepped over. We realized that we couldn’t do the right thing consistently here and so we removed the feature rather than give you incorrect results in the debugger. However, we want to bring this back for you and our CLR and Debugger teams are looking at a number potential solutions to this problem. Unfortunately this is will not be part of Visual Studio 11.

https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/597933/add-a-return-pseudo-variable-to-the-visual-studio-debugger-for-net-code

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Per @Alex above (stackoverflow.com/a/3714884/402949), this is available for VS2013 with CLR 4.5 –  Dan Solovay Jan 2 at 13:21

Old trick from pre .Net days : Open the Registers window and look at the value of the EAX register, this contains the return value of the last function called.

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+1 for old school closer to the metal approach - this will, however, not work for all return values (and it's up to the JIT'er, obviously - who knows what crazy optimization it might decide on that won't use EAX?). For integral types it will (mostly?) work. Large value types are a different matter (and as far as I recall from some blog post, those won't be displayed in VS2013 either). –  JimmiTh Aug 10 '13 at 2:12

If you go to options, IntelliTrace, and change the setting to collect events and call information. You can go back to the previous call event (Ctrl+Shift+F11) and see the temporary value returned from the method call in the autos window as a child of the method name.

This isn't showing you the return value for the method you are in, it just shows you the return value of the last method called in the current method.

So, it's fine for:

DataTable go(){return someTableAdapter.getSomeData();}

as it shows you the return value for someTableAdapter.getSomeData()

but not for:

int go(){return 100 * 99;}
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3  
I like this answer, except that it has a $12k price tag (visual studio ultimate). –  mydogisbox Apr 13 '12 at 18:31

Step out of the go() method using Shift-F11, and then in the "Autos" debug window it will show the return value of the method call which just popped off the stack (in this case, the go() method which is what you want). This is the behaviour in Visual Studio 2005; I haven't used Visual Studio 2008 so I don't know if this behaves the same way in that version.

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I've tried this in both VS2005 and VS2008, but I don't really see it. I have the "Autos" window open, but when in the "go" function, the autos-window is just empty. Also when stepping out of the function (the closing curly brace of the function is yellow). Can you give me one more hint? –  doekman Nov 6 '08 at 10:32
    
I would expect the Autos-window to be empty while INSIDE the go() function. You need to step COMPLETELY OUT of the function (i.e. the debug cursor should be pointing to the function which has CALLED go()) and then you should see the return value for go() in the Autos window. –  LeopardSkinPillBoxHat Nov 6 '08 at 10:39
    
@LeopardSkinPillBoxHat: can't get this to work, even with your extra hint. Are you trying this in Visual Basic? It appears to have better support for observing and changing return values... –  romkyns Nov 18 '09 at 17:41
2  
@LeopardSkinPillBoxHat: no, it doesn't do that in C#. P.S. Wow, took me a while to see this again. –  romkyns Apr 30 '10 at 20:43
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Does not work in VS 2010 C# –  sergtk Sep 21 '11 at 14:30

There are a lot of work arounds, but none seems satisfactory.

To quote John Skeet below:

Still looks inconvenient to me - especially if you don't know which return value you're going to need before you start debugging. I really don't want to have to have a temporary variable cluttering up my code every time I ever return anything.t

In theory, the debugger could have a return-variable. After all: it's just a variable on the stack:

unsafe {
  int * sp = stackalloc int[1];
  try {
    return a+b;
  }
  finally {
    Trace.WriteLine("return is " + *(sp+3));
  }
}

So consider this an feature request for Visual Studio.

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there's quite a big a difference between a variable (a well-defined local) and a value on the stack. It is a value on the stack, but it isn't a variable (=local). –  Marc Gravell Jun 6 '10 at 19:09
    
@Marc: I'm not sure how the CLR works, but a lot of compilers put function arguments on the stack below the stack pointer (sp), and local variables on the stack, above the stack pointer. That is just what I'm trying to show. And OK, when the return value is a reference type, you just get some pointer value. –  doekman Mar 30 '11 at 9:36
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It's not necessarily on the stack. In fact, if you view Debug -> Registers you're apt to see it in EAX –  Mark Sowul Nov 18 '11 at 15:40

The only way I know, is to place a breakpoint on the return line and then call the Quick Watch Window and enter the returned expression :

someTableAdapter.getSomeData();

But this only works if the call does not change the state of any object (since there will be a second call to the same method when you will resume the execution).

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4  
This also only works if your expression doesn't have lambdas. –  romkyns Nov 18 '09 at 17:42

Microsoft Visual C++ used to do this, but Visual Studio doesn't AFAIK.. :(

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I think you can determine this by looking at the RAX register in the Registers window (Debug / Windows / Registers). After stepping out (SHIFT + F11) of the function, check the RAX register. I don't know for a fact, but once upon a moon you could check a register (pre .NET days) and see the return value there. It might even be a combination of RAX and RBX, etc.

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Yes, there is a very nice way. One significant drawback is that you'd have to wait for 5, maybe 6 years. Since I see that you posted in November 2008, I suggest that you waaaaaa...

...aaaait. And voilà! Just for you, MS has released the latest Visual Studio 2013 where it's a default feature accessible from the menus while running in debug mode (Debug -> Windows -> Autos).

NB. I do understand that your issue is resolved or forgotten long time ago. Nevertheless, I got this hit when I googled on the very same matter, so it deserved an update. It's meant a little bit as a joke, though.

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You can also ask to evaluate the value in the intermediate window as well, if it does not set flags or other variables, but only returns something.

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Doesn't work with lambdas, screwing this solution royally :( –  romkyns Nov 18 '09 at 17:39
    
You need to include the lambda in the question, as I use the immediate window too sometimes –  Chris S Sep 6 '10 at 14:18

Yeah, by switching to VB.NET. ;P (You did just say "Visual Studio". ;)

For as long as I can remember (from VB through all versions of VB.NET), you can simply query the Function Name. It "functions" like a Local Variable that's implicitly declared at the start of the Function and its current value is also used as the Return value whenever the Function exits via non-Return Statement means (i.e. Exit Function or just falling through) and of course, when the Return Statement is used, it is also set to the Return Statement's expression. Just like a Local Variable, its value can be inspected at any point of execution inside the Function (including after the Return Statement is executed). C# doesn't have this and should.

That little VB.NET feature (plus the Exit Function Statement which it enables - another feature C# doesn't have and should) is very useful in a form of Defensive Programming I practice where I always initialize the Function Name to the failure/default value as the 1st Statement. Then, at any failure point (which normally occurs much more often than success points), I can simply call the Exit Function Statement (i.e. without having to duplicate the failure / default expression or even a Constant/Variable name).

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You could try selecting "someTableAdapter.getSomeData();", right clicking on it and go for Quick Watch.

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Open the Debug-Autos window gets you close. It won't show the actual return value, but will show what was evaluated in the return statement.

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Couldn't get VS2008 autos window to show anything like that. Could you please clarify? –  romkyns Nov 18 '09 at 17:40
    
return x + y; What I meant was if you set a breakpoint on this line, then your Debug-Autos window will display the current values for x and y. As I said, it only get's you close. Just trying to be helpful. I don't think that deserves a downvote. –  GeekyMonkey Nov 21 '11 at 16:25

Drag and drop the return expression into a watch window.

Eg: In the statement

return someTableAdapter.getSomeData();

drag and drop

someTableAdapter.getSomeData()

into a watch window and you'll see the value.

You can do this for any expression.

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1  
The problem with that: the expression is evaluated twice. –  doekman Feb 9 '09 at 8:03
6  
And watch expressions can't contain lambda expressions, which I use a fair bit. –  Steve Crane Aug 17 '09 at 14:31

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