Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to create a webpage layout with the sidebar to the right and the main content flowing around the sidebar.

Requirements:

  1. Content below the sidebar should occupy all of the available width
  2. Content below the sidebar should not wrap when it hits the left of the sidebar
  3. Main content should precede the sidebar in the markup
  4. Sidebar has fixed width but unknown/variable height
  5. CSS-only - no JavaScript solutions

This could be achieved without the third requirement: if the sidebar is before the main content in the markup and is within the same containing element, a simple right float does the job. A sidebar before the main content in the markup is not an option here. The sidebar will contain supplemental information and adverts. If this is before the main content in the markup it will be annoying to CSSless browsers and screenreader users (even with 'skip to ...' links).

This could be achieved without the fourth requirement. If the sidebar had a fixed height I could put a containing element before the main content, float it right and give it a suitable width and height and then use absolute positioning to put the sidebar on top of the pre-made space.

Example markup (without CSS, relevant bits only):

<body>
  <div id="content">
    <p>
      Lorem ipsum ....
    </p>
    <p>
      Pellentesque ....
    </p>
    <div id="sidebar">
      /* has some form of fixed width */
    </div>
  </div>
</body>

Example layout:

alt text

I'm not sure if this is possible. I'm happy to accept an authoritative answer stating that this cannot be achieved. If this can't be achieved I'd appreciate an explanation - knowing why it can't be achieved is much more valuable than just being told it can't.

Update: I'm happy to see answers that don't meet all of the five requirements, so long as an answer states which requirement is being ignored plus the consequences (pros and cons) of ignoring the requirement. I can then make an informed compromise.

Update 2: I can't ignore requirement 3 - the sidebar cannot precede the content.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Simple floating w/ opposite source order just can't be done (w/o CSS3 draft specs). The pragmatic approach is to first build a nice layout that supports your desired source order. HTML:

<div id="content" class="noJs">
  <div id="floatSpace"></div>
  <p>Lorem ipsum ....</p>
  <p>Pellentesque ....</p>
  <div id="sidebar">content</div>
</div>

CSS:

#content {position:relative;}
#sidebar {width:150px; position:absolute; top:0; right:0;}
.noJs {padding-right:150px;}
.noJs #floatSpace {display:none;}
.js #floatSpace {float:right; width:150px;}

This satisfies all but 1 and 2. Now, we add the JS:

$(function () {
  // make floatSpace the same height as sidebar
  $('#floatSpace').height($('#sidebar').height());
  // trigger alternate layout
  $('#content')[0].className = 'js';
});

This will make the contents float around #floatSpace, and #sidebar will remain positioned on top of it. This is better than moving #sidebar because source order remains the same (for screenreaders that support Javascript, etc.).

share|improve this answer

I don't have anywhere to test it right now, and I'm not sure if it will work, but have you tried displaying the sidebar div as inline and going from there?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion Gabe - tried but to not avail. –  Jon Cram Nov 6 '08 at 11:29

I believe you're gonna have to change the order for this, putting the sidebar first. Then, use CSS's float property (without changing order, div#sidebar would end up below the paragraphs vs next to them). div#sidebar should stretch as needed for height.

CSS:

#sidebar {
    float: right;
    width: 50px;
}

HTML:

<body>
  <div id="content">
    <div id="sidebar">
      /* has some form of fixed width */
    </div>

    <!-- paragraphs -->
  </div>
</body>


@Jon Cram [comment]

Ok...nvm. You stated your own answer and rejected it at the same time.

You can't float an element around other elements that are defined before it. The browser has to be able to answer "float around what?" And it looks to the next element to start, continuing as far as necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, please see the requirements: the sidebar must not precede the main content in the markup. –  Jon Cram Nov 6 '08 at 10:01

To my knowledge, the only way of getting the sidebar where you want (without the obvious markup reordering) is to set #content { position: relative; } and #sidebar { position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; }

Unfortunately, absolute positioning will take the sidebar out of the flowing layout and the content of #content will not avoid #sidebar as you desire.

share|improve this answer

Ok, here's another answer then, since we can ignore one of the requirements, skip out the first requirement where the content wraps underneath the sidebar.

#sidebar {
  float: left;
  width: 100px;
}
#actualContent {
  width: 700px;
  float: left;
}

The only change to your code is that you have to put your actual content in another wrapper.

<div id="content">
    <div id="actualContent">
        <p>...</p>
        <p>...</p>
    </div>
    <div id="sidebar">
        <p>...</p>
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

If you can rearrange your HTML so the sidebar is before the content, then this is easy:

#sidebar { float: right; width: 150px; }

.. and then just make sure to clear it afterwards (at the end of the #content div).

I know your intentions are in the right place, serving the content in the right order, but unless you're expecting a lot of traffic from visually impaired users, then I think you might need to reconsider your priorities.

share|improve this answer
    
Cheers Nick - I appreciate you considering my intentions in your answer. Having the sidebar in the markup before the content is really not good for me. I'd rather have the sidebar after the content and not have the content wrap nicely. –  Jon Cram Nov 6 '08 at 10:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.