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My program has the following class definition:

public sealed class Subscriber
{
    private subscription;
    public Subscriber(int id)
    {
        using (DataContext dc = new DataContext())
        {
           this.subscription = dc._GetSubscription(id).SingleOrDefault();                
        }            
    }
}

,where

_GetSubscription() is a sproc which returns a value of type ISingleResult<_GetSubscriptionResult>

Say, I have a list of type List<int> full of 1000 ids and I want to create a collection of subscribers of type List<Subscriber>.

How can I do that without calling the constructor in a loop for 1000 times?

Since I am trying to avoid switching the DataContext on/off so frequently that may stress the database.

TIA.

share|improve this question
    
Where do the 1000 id's come from? Can you alter the database so it uses a function instead of a sproc? –  SteadyEddi Apr 21 '10 at 9:48
    
Thanks for your comment... Not by choice really, I'm just coding in the way to use that funny sproc as I were told, my user name kind of giving out some hints on my power of influence to others :-) –  Chris Apr 21 '10 at 10:21
    
Fixed the code, see my answer. –  Stefan Steinegger Apr 21 '10 at 12:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Write a static factory method which calls a private constructor.

public sealed class Subscriber
{
    // other constructors ...

    // this constructor is not visible from outside.
    private Subscriber(DataContext dc, int id)
    {
       // this line should probably be in another method for reusability.
       this.subscription = dc._GetSubscription(id).SingleOrDefault();                
    }

    public List<Subscriber> CreateSubscribers(IEnumerable<int> ids)
    {
        using (DataContext dc = new DataContext())
        {

           return ids
             .Select(x => new Subscriber(dc, x))
             // create a list to force execution of above constructor
             // while in the using block.
             .ToList();
        }            

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Stefan, Your answer is really cool. However I got a System.ObjectDisposedException as the DataContext dc is disposed. System.ObjectDisposedException was unhandled Message="Cannot access a disposed object.\r\nObject name: 'DataContext accessed after Dispose.'." Source="System.Data.Linq" ObjectName="DataContext accessed after Dispose." Thanks –  Chris Apr 21 '10 at 10:17
    
I tried saving a local copy of the return value but that still doesn't work. –  Chris Apr 21 '10 at 10:18
    
I managed to get it to work by doing something like..... return ids.select(x => new Subscriber(dc, x)).ToList(); But I'm confused what's going on here. One thing that I'm pretty sure is that the IEnumerable<Subscriber>'s life time is tied with the DataContext. –  Chris Apr 21 '10 at 10:51
    
Yes, sorry, I fixed it. The problem is that the lambda expression is executed when accessing the IEnumerable (from the caller). A common mistake when working with IEnumerables. –  Stefan Steinegger Apr 21 '10 at 12:40
    
Thanks a lot Stefan for your solution, that really helps, I know that's the so-called "deferred execution" in LINQ to SQL, but still want to know why IEnumerable is gone with the DataContext, even a reference is saved. –  Chris Apr 21 '10 at 14:45

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