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I'm trying to describe a Sudoku Board in C++ with a union statement:

union Board
{
    int board[9][9];
    int sec1[3][3];
    int sec2[3][3];
    int sec3[3][3];
    int sec4[3][3];
    int sec5[3][3];
    int sec6[3][3];
    int sec7[3][3];
    int sec8[3][3];
    int sec9[3][3];     
}

Would each section of the board correspond with the correct part of the array? IE,

Would sec4 correspond with board[4-6][0-3]? Is there a better way to do this sort of thing (specifically describing a sudoku board)?

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7  
Whatever your problem, a union is almost never the right answer. –  anon Apr 21 '10 at 11:27
    
Isn't a union meant to conserve space and just it? Does the standard even guarantee what happens, when I put something into sec3[1][1] and then read board[0][4]? –  Maciej Hehl Apr 21 '10 at 11:44
    
@Maciej H: The Standard does make a guarantee about POD-structs with common initial sequences (which doesn't include arrays, except in POD-structs), but that's all. Aside from that, there's common practices, but I don't know if any implementation documents what it does with unions. (DEFINITION: A POD-struct is a struct that contains "Plain Old Data", which is pretty much what you can have in a C program.) –  David Thornley Apr 21 '10 at 14:41
    
Maciej: Yes, when you put something in sec3[1][1] and read it from board[0][4], the standard guarantees that you have evoked undefined behavior. You don't want to do that. –  John Dibling Apr 21 '10 at 15:10
    
Might be worth noting that the POD restrictions are eased in C++0x –  jalf Apr 21 '10 at 16:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could achieve the effect you want by encapsulating it in a class:

class Board {
public:
    int& sec1(int r, int c) { return board[r][c]); }
    int& sec2(int r, int c) { return board[r][c+3]; }
    // etc.

private:
    int board[9][9];
};

but, I'm not sure this is the best way to represent a Sudoku board. You may find that once you start working on the logic, you'll come up with a better representation.

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+1 Better solution; Note that you can also use a single function with the section number as parameter. –  Tomas Apr 21 '10 at 11:42
    
Yep, much better solution. Instead of trying to design a magic structure with physically overlapping members, just define a number of accessors that provide different views of the same data. –  jalf Apr 21 '10 at 11:46

The answer is no, the memory layout will not be what you expect. Note that whenever you define an array in C/C++ the memory is contiguous, so for the 9x9 array the 4th element is not the first element of the second row, but rather the first element of the first row of the second 3x3 block.

The memory layout of your union will have the sec blocks over each one of the 9 lines of the full object.

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This won't work, as written.

A union behaves as if all its members are at offset 0 from the union's start.

That means that sec9 will have the same offset (zero) as sec1, thus overlap.

I don't think it's possible to do it using a union either, since you would need to express that there's a certain "skip" that needs to happen after the end of each section, to get to the next cell in that section. You can't do that using C or C++ arrays.

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Is there a way to achieve this sort of thing though? –  cam Apr 21 '10 at 11:27
    
Nope. The sections overlap with the rows of the full board –  Maciej Hehl Apr 21 '10 at 11:36

Every union member, thus every sec1..sec9 very sec will be in the same location. You could try wrap all sects in a struct, but still they will not correspond to 3x3 squares, but rather 9*1 rows in original structure:

union Board
{
    int board[9][9];
    struct {
        int sec1[3][3];
        int sec2[3][3];
        int sec3[3][3];
        int sec4[3][3];
        int sec5[3][3];
        int sec6[3][3];
        int sec7[3][3];
        int sec8[3][3];
        int sec9[3][3];     
    } sects;

}

To sum up, real class would be the best approach.

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You are not going to solve this purely using C++ language features - you need to think about the data structure and operations on that structure that are needed to solve your problem - in other words you need to design a class (or more likely several classes). This is the fun part of programming, so I'm not going to suggest a solution.

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Hey, I love that part too. I'm simply asking for a way to create overlapping data. :( –  cam Apr 21 '10 at 11:32

Another solution (besides the one proposed by Ferruccio) could be to define arrays of 3 pointers to ints - one for each section, and initialise those arrays accordingly in the constructor.

class Board {
public:
    int *sec1[3]; // sec1[0] = &(board[0][0]), sec1[1] = &(board[1][0]),sec1[2] = &(board[2][0])
    ...

    int board[9][9];
};

But frankly methods for access are probably much better.

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That will not work, because each 3 * 3 region in the 9 * 9 board will be occupying non-contiguous memory anyway.

What I have done is:

Cell grid[9][9];
Cell* cell_ptr[3][81]; //0 = by rows; 1 = by columns; 2 = by box

where cell_ptr is populated with pointers into the grid so that cell_ptr[0][0...80] allows iterating over rows, cell_ptr[1][0...80] will be iterating over columns, and cell_ptr[2][0...80] allows iterating over 3 * 3 regions.

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