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What is the simplest way to calculate the amount of even numbers in a range of unsigned integers?

An example: if range is [0...4] then the answer is 3 (0,2,4)

I'm having hard time to think of any simple way. The only solution I came up involved couple of if-statements. Is there a simple line of code that can do this without if-statements or ternary operators?

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3  
Size of the range divided by two? –  anon Apr 21 '10 at 11:34
2  
Needs homework tag ? –  Paul R Apr 21 '10 at 11:36
1  
@Neil: No that is not always correct. –  Brian R. Bondy Apr 21 '10 at 11:51
4  
+1 Because this is more challenging than one might think at first. –  Aistina Apr 21 '10 at 12:09
1  
@Kirk: of course -- why not? –  Vlad Apr 21 '10 at 13:22
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15 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted
int even = (0 == begin % 2) ? (end - begin) / 2 + 1 : (end - begin + 1) / 2;

Which can be converted into:

int even = (end - begin + (begin % 2)) / 2 + (1 - (begin % 2));

EDIT: This can further simplified into:

int even = (end - begin + 2 - (begin % 2)) / 2;

EDIT2: Because of the in my opinion somewhat incorrect definition of integer division in C (integer division truncates downwards for positive numbers and upwards for negative numbers) this formula won't work when begin is a negative odd number.

EDIT3: User 'iPhone beginner' correctly observes that if begin % 2 is replaced with begin & 1 this will work correctly for all ranges.

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Doesn't work for the OP's example, i.e. 0..4 should return 3. –  Paul R Apr 21 '10 at 11:35
    
@Paul R Fencepost error, fixed. –  Andreas Brinck Apr 21 '10 at 11:38
    
Seems to be wrong. For given example [0..4] even = (4 - 0 - (0%2)) /2 = 4/2 = 2. I think int even = (end - begin - (begin % 2)) / 2 + 1; is a proper answer –  SergGr Apr 21 '10 at 11:38
    
This only seems to work for ranges starting at 0? Try 10 .. 1 –  Greg K Apr 21 '10 at 11:49
    
@Greg K with end = 10 and begin = 1 this gives 5 which I think is the correct answer. –  Andreas Brinck Apr 21 '10 at 11:52
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Hint 1: The modulo operator will return the remainder of the current number
Hint 2: You don't need a for loop
Hint 3: A range is continuous
Hint 4: The number of even numbers in a continuous range are half even (sometimes half + 1, sometimes half - 1)
Hint 5: Building on Hint1: Consider also what (being + end + 1) % 2 gives
Hint 6: Most or all of the answers in this thread are wrong
Hint 7: Make sure you try your solution with negative number ranges
Hint 8: Make sure you try your solution with ranges spanning both negative and positive numbers

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that I know, but putting it in a clear sentence is bit difficult. Depending on range there can be n/2 or n/2 + 1 even numbers. –  Fdr Apr 21 '10 at 11:46
    
@Fdr: See hint #1. –  Brian R. Bondy Apr 21 '10 at 11:50
    
@Fdr: And consider what would happen if you used it on an endpoint. –  Brian R. Bondy Apr 21 '10 at 11:52
    
@Fdr: See hint 5 above –  Brian R. Bondy Apr 21 '10 at 12:15
    
@Brian: your calculation doesn't work for end = beg = -1. –  Vlad Apr 21 '10 at 12:26
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int start, stop;
start = 0;
stop = 9;
printf("%d",(stop-start)/2+((!(start%2) || !(stop%2)) ? 1 : 0));

Where start and stop can hold any value. No need to iterate to to determine this number.

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The count of even numbers between 0 and n is [n/2] + 1. Therefore the count of even numbers between (n + 1) and m is ([m/2] + 1) - ([n/2] + 1) = [m/2] - [n/2].

For count of even numbers between m and n the answer therefore would be [m/2] - [(n - 1)/2].

The [x] is taken to the direction of -\infty. Beware that the usual C integer division is not doing right in our case: a/2 is rounded towards zero, not -\infty, so the result will be not [a/2] for teh case of negative a.

This should be the simplest calculation; works for negative numbers, too. (Needs however that m >= n.) Doesn't contain ifs and ?:s.

If you don't consider negative numbers, you can use just m/2 - (n+1)/2 + 1, otherwise floor(m/2.0) - floor((n-1)/2.0)

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This'll do the trick, even for ranges with negative numbers.

int even = (last - first + 2 - Math.abs(first % 2) - Math.abs(last % 2)) / 2;

Tested with the following code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[][] numbers = {{0, 4}, {0, 5}, {1, 4}, {1, 5}, {4, 4}, {5, 5},
                       {-1, 0}, {-5, 0}, {-4, 5}, {-5, 5}, {-4, -4}, {-5, -5}};

    for (int[] pair : numbers) {
        int first = pair[0];
        int last = pair[1];
        int even = (last - first + 2 - Math.abs(first % 2) - Math.abs(last % 2)) / 2;
        System.out.println("[" + first + ", " + last + "] -> " + even);
    }
}

Output:

[0, 4] -> 3
[0, 5] -> 3
[1, 4] -> 2
[1, 5] -> 2
[4, 4] -> 1
[5, 5] -> 0
[-1, 0] -> 1
[-5, 0] -> 3
[-4, 5] -> 5
[-5, 5] -> 5
[-4, -4] -> 1
[-5, -5] -> 0
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I'm a bit surprised that iteration was tried to solve this. The minimum number of even numbers possible in a range is equal to half of the length of the array of numbers, or, rangeEnd - rangeStart.
Add 1 if the first or last number is even.

So the method is: (using javascript)

function evenInRange(rangeStart, rangeEnd)
{
  return
    Math.floor(rangeEnd - rangeStart) + 
    ((rangeStart % 2 == 0) || (rangeEnd % 2 == 0) ? 1 : 0)
}


Tests:
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
8 - 0 = 8
8 / 2 = 4
4 + 1 = 5
Even numbers in range:
0 2 4 6 8

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
20 - 11 = 9
9 / 2 = 4
4 + 1 = 5
Even numbers in range
12 14 16 18 20

1 2 3
3 - 1 = 2
2 / 2 = 1
1 + 0 = 1
Even numbers in range
2

2 3 4 5
5 - 2 = 3
3 / 2 = 1
1 + 1 = 2
Even numbers in range
2 4

2 3 4 5 6
6 - 2 = 4
4 / 2 = 2
2 + 1 = 3
Even numbers in range
2 4 6
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2  
Your tests all divide by 2 but your formula doesn't include a division at all. –  Kirk Broadhurst Apr 21 '10 at 13:11
    
You're correct, it should say Math.floor((rangeEnd - rangeStart) / 2) Thanks –  souLTower Apr 22 '10 at 10:12
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I'd say

(max - min + 1 + (min % 2)) / 2

Edit: Erm okay for some reason I thought that (min % 2) returns 1 for even numbers.... :). The correct version is

(max - min + 1 + 1 - (min % 2)) / 2

or rather

(max - min + 2 - (min % 2)) / 2
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What if min and max are both 1? –  Arkku Apr 21 '10 at 11:41
    
Yes you're right, silly me. See above. –  Bus Apr 21 '10 at 12:03
    
Doesn't work for (-3, -2) –  Kirk Broadhurst Apr 21 '10 at 13:19
    
The requirements talk about unsigned integers ;). (Btw none of the methods here work for negative numbers because of the way division and modulo are handled for negative numbers in C.) –  Bus Apr 21 '10 at 19:17
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The first even number in the range is: (begin + 1) & ~1 (round begin up to even number).

The last even number in the range is: end & ~1 (round end down to even number).

The total number of even numbers in the range is therefore: (end & ~1) - ((begin + 1) & ~1) + 1.

int num_evens = (end & ~1) - ((begin + 1) & ~1) + 1;
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Is the ~1 function defined? Nice clean algorithm but I do not know of such a function. –  Kirk Broadhurst Apr 21 '10 at 12:18
    
@Kirk: ~ is the bitwise unary NOT operator in C/C++. So ~1 is an int with all but the LS bit set to 1. –  Paul R Apr 21 '10 at 16:12
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Let's look at this logically ...

We have four cases ...

odd -> odd     eg.  1 -> 3  answer: 1
odd -> even    eg.  1 -> 4  answer: 2
even -> odd    eg.  0 -> 3  answer: 2
even -> even   eg.  0 -> 4  answer: 3

The first three cases can be handled simply as ...

(1 + last - first) / 2

The fourth case does not fall quite so nicely into this, but we can fudge around a little bit for it quite easily ...

answer = (1 + last - first) / 2;
if (both first and last are even)
    answer++;

Hope this helps.

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The range is always [2a+b, 2c+d] with b,d = {0,1}. Make a table:

b d | #even
0 0 | c-a+1
0 1 | c-a+1
1 0 | c-a
1 1 | c-a+1

Now a = min/2, b = min % 2, c = max/2 and d = max % 2.

So int nEven = max/2 - min/2 + 1 - (min%2)

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Doesn't work for (-3,-2) –  Kirk Broadhurst Apr 21 '10 at 13:17
    
nope, I didn't consider negative numbers, my mistake –  Tobias Kienzler Apr 21 '10 at 13:54
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Oh well, why not:

#include <cassert>

int ecount( int begin, int end ) {
    assert( begin <= end );
    int size = (end - begin) + 1;
    if ( size % 2 == 0  || begin % 2 == 1 ) {
        return size / 2;
    }
    else {
        return size / 2 + 1;
    }
}

int main() {
    assert( ecount( 1, 5 ) == 2 );
    assert( ecount( 1, 6 ) == 3 );
    assert( ecount( 2, 6 ) == 3 );
    assert( ecount( 1, 1 ) == 0 );
    assert( ecount( 2, 2 ) == 1 );
}
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It makes sense but it's not a single line of code with if statements. –  Kirk Broadhurst Apr 21 '10 at 12:23
    
It's the "easiest" solution, IMHO - which was the headline question. I can't see any possible reason for writing it as a one-liner. –  anon Apr 21 '10 at 12:25
    
@Neil - there are plenty here! Surely one must be correct! ;) try mine, for example. –  Kirk Broadhurst Apr 21 '10 at 12:32
    
@Kirk I didn't suggest they were incorrect. –  anon Apr 21 '10 at 12:33
    
@Neil: My reason is curiosity. Not knowing a solution, doesn't mean that there isn't one. –  Fdr Apr 21 '10 at 12:36
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The answer:

(max - min + 2 - (max % 2) - (min % 2)) / 2

A short explanation:

  • even..even yields (length + 1) / 2
  • even..odd yields length / 2
  • odd..even yields length / 2
  • odd..odd yields (length - 1) / 2

  • length = max - min + 1

Therefore, the answer is (length - 1) / 2 plus 1/2 for even min plus 1/2 for even max. Note that (length - 1) / 2 == (max - min) / 2, and the "bonuses" are (1 - (min % 2)) / 2 and (1 - (max % 2)) / 2. Sum this all up and simplify to obtain the answer above.

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Doesn't work for negatives, e.g. (-3,-2). –  Kirk Broadhurst Apr 21 '10 at 13:14
    
Right. It should be: (max - min + 2 - (abs(max) % 2) - (abs(min) % 2)) / 2. –  Bolo Apr 21 '10 at 13:56
    
On the other hand, the question explicitly states "a range of unsigned integers". –  Bolo Apr 21 '10 at 14:09
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In terms of start and length:

(length >> 1) + (1 & ~start & length)

half the length plus 1 if start is even and length is odd.

In terms of start and end:

((end - start + 1) >> 1) + (1 & ~start & ~end)

half the length plus 1 if start is even and end is even.

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I'm a bit proud of using bitwise AND as a conditional actually. :) –  Christoffer Hammarström Apr 21 '10 at 14:25
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This does not require any conditions at all:

evencount = floor((max - min)/2) + 1
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Pseudo code (i'm no C coder):

count = 0;
foreach(i in range){
    if(i % 2 == 0){
      count++;
    }
}
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3  
loop is overkill here –  SergGr Apr 21 '10 at 11:36
2  
O(n) is way too expensive (...and ugly) –  Fdr Apr 21 '10 at 11:39
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