Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to make a program with a limited amount of threads (currently using newFixedThreadPool) but I have the problem that all threads get created from start, filling up memory at alarming rate.

I wish to prevent this. Threads should only be created shortly before they are executed.

e.g.: I call the program and instruct it to use 2 threads in the pool. The program should create & launch the first 2 Threads immediately (obviously), create the next 2 to wait for the previous 2, and at that point wait until one or both of the first 2 ended executing.

I thought about extending executor or FixedThreadPool or such. However I have no clue on how to start there and doubt it is the best solution. Easiest would have my main Thread sleeping on intervals, which is not really good either...

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Looking at the details in your post...

I call the program and instruct it to use 2 threads in the pool. The program should create & launch the first 2 Threads immediately (obviously), create the next 2 to wait for the previous 2, and at that point wait until one or both of the first 2 ended executing.

Your problem is much more about synchronizing tasks execution than in fact pooling threads. From what you say here, you want to have 2 threads executing any number of tasks; if you don't want to have 100 jobs running at the same time, don't create a 100 threads pool...

I would suggest either using a BlockingQueue to control your Runnables, or create a 2 threads pool using a ThreadPoolExecutor, and feed it all your tasks. It will execute them when threads are available.

Does that make sense with what you try to achieve here?

share|improve this answer
    
It makes more sense. But thanks to your answer I have landed on the producer / consumer method, which is exactly what I need: 1 producer reading the file, and x (to be defined) consumers. Thanks :) –  cpf Apr 21 '10 at 14:47
    
Great, happy it helped ;-) –  Etienne Apr 21 '10 at 16:43

Have you tried taking a look at ThreadPoolExecutor ? Using the right constructor parameters, you could easily tweak the number and keep-alive time of the created threads.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, and for him, he needs to set the core-thread number to 0. –  gimpf Apr 21 '10 at 13:19
    
I don't see how that changes the situation actually... In my main thread I'm reading from a file, and according to some content in the line I'm reading, I create a thread and add it to the executor. In this constructor I add the read lines, so the object has them. In result I'm actually stuffing the file in-memory, but larger files will result in a huge performance hit and/or too little memory... –  cpf Apr 21 '10 at 13:35

I don't think you should manipulate the thread pool implementation. If you create the threads shortly before execution, you lose the main benefit of the pool, that recycles your threads.

Maybe you should reduce the maximum number of threads in the pool. If you instruct the pool to create too many of them, the total out-of-heap memory used for their stack spaces will consume all available memory. I assume that this is the kind of OutOfMemoryError you have (?).

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't had the error yet. But I predict it will. At some point the program should work with larger and larger datasets and I doubt the machine's memory will always be able to hold it all. –  cpf Apr 21 '10 at 13:29

If you're looking at this from a performance perspective, then it's best to take the hit in memory when you first start up the application than constantly get bombarded with allocating and deallocating memory while the program is running.

If it's using too much memory when you start the application, then it will still be too much memory later. You should throttle down the size of the thread pool.

There are additional benefits to using a thread pool, such as if you lose a thread along the way, the thread pool will automatically create a new one to replace it, keeping your thread pool at a constant size.

If this isn't the type of benefit that you're looking for, then you may wish to handle the threads in memory manually, and avoid the thread pool.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I'll give my own handling a shot. Although that sounds like a lot of work keeping track of the number of threads and all. Also, it still requires sleep moments to wait for threads to end. Is there a way to "wait" for several threads without ThreadPool? –  cpf Apr 21 '10 at 13:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.