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In MSDN I found CloseReason.UserClosing to know that the user had decided to close the form but I guess it is the same for both clicking the X button or clicking the close button. So how can I differentiate between these two in my code?

Thanks all.

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1  
which close button do you mean? –  Brian R. Bondy Apr 21 '10 at 14:17
    
What "Close button"? –  SLaks Apr 21 '10 at 14:19
    
for example closing by "ALT+F4" –  BDotA Apr 21 '10 at 14:26
    
Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1623756/… –  Oliver Apr 22 '10 at 6:55
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5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Assuming you're asking for WinForms, you may use the FormClosing() event. The event FormClosing() is triggered any time a form is to get closed.

To detect if the user clicked either X or your CloseButton, you may get it through the sender object. Try to cast sender as a Button control, and verify perhaps for its name "CloseButton", for instance.

private void Form1_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e) {
    if (string.Equals((sender as Button).Name, @"CloseButton"))
        // Do something proper to CloseButton.
    else
        // Then assume that X has been clicked and act accordingly.
}

Otherwise, I have never ever needed to differentiate whether X or CloseButton was clicked, as I wanted to perform something specific on the FormClosing event, like closing all MdiChildren before closing the MDIContainerForm, or event checking for unsaved changes. Under these circumstances, we don't need, according to me, to differentiate from either buttons.

EDIT Closing by [ALT]+[F4] will also trigger the FormClosing() event, as it sends a message to the Form that says to close. You may cancel the event by setting the

FormClosingEventArgs.Cancel = true. 

In our example, this would translate to be

e.Cancel = true.

Notice the difference between the FormClosing() and the FormClosed() events.

FormClosing occurs when the form received the message to be closed, and verify whether it has something to do before it is closed.

FormClosed occurs when the form is actually closed, so after it is closed.

Does this help?

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Yes, thanks for the "Cast" idea, had used this technique with Delphi 7 but forgot to do the same in C# –  BDotA Apr 21 '10 at 14:44
    
This in fact is a port from Delphi to .NET. =) I'm glad I helped! –  Will Marcouiller Apr 21 '10 at 17:44
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The CloseReason enumeration you found on MSDN is just for the purpose of checking whether the user closed the app, or it was due to a shutdown, or closed by the task manager, etc...

You can do different actions, according to the reason, like:

void Form_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
{
    if(e.CloseReason == CloseReason.UserClosing)
        // Prompt user to save his data

    if(e.CloseReason == CloseReason.WindowsShutDown)
        // Autosave and clear up ressources
}

But like you guessed, there is no difference between clicking the x button, or rightclicking the taskbar and clicking 'close', or pressing Alt F4, etc. It all ends up in a CloseReason.UserClosing reason.

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+1 I didn't know about the CloseReason enum. Thanks! =) –  Will Marcouiller Apr 21 '10 at 14:34
1  
Using the standard Close(); seems to trigger CloseReason.UserClosing for me. Not sure why. –  Dan W Mar 2 '13 at 16:44
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The "X" button registers as DialogResult.Cancel so another option is to evaluate the DialogResult.

If you have multiple buttons on your form, you're probably already associating different DialogResults to each and this will provide you with the means to tell the difference between each button.

(Example: btnSubmit.DialogResult = DialogResult.OK, btnClose.DialogResult = Dialogresult.Abort)

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        this.FormClosing += Form1_FormClosing;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Override the Close Form event
    /// Do something
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sender"></param>
    /// <param name="e"></param>
    private void Form1_FormClosing(Object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
    {
        //In case windows is trying to shut down, don't hold the process up
        if (e.CloseReason == CloseReason.WindowsShutDown) return;

        if (this.DialogResult == DialogResult.Cancel)
        {
            // Assume that X has been clicked and act accordingly.
            // Confirm user wants to close
            switch (MessageBox.Show(this, "Are you sure?", "Do you still want ... ?", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo, MessageBoxIcon.Question))
            {
                //Stay on this form
                case DialogResult.No:
                    e.Cancel = true;
                    break;
                default:
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
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In my case this is more useful than the accepted answer. Since the 'X' is assigned DialogResult.Cancel, assigning some other value to the cancel button easily distinguish them and handle things appropriately. –  mickeyf Feb 7 '13 at 16:59
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It determines when to close the application if a form is closed (if your application is not attached to a specific form).

    private void MyForm_FormClosed(object sender, FormClosedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (Application.OpenForms.Count == 0) Application.Exit();
    }
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if (this.DialogResult == DialogResult.Cancel)
        {

        }
        else
        {
            switch (e.CloseReason)
            {
                case CloseReason.UserClosing:
                    e.Cancel = true;
                    break;
            }
        }

if condition will execute when user clicks 'X' or close button on form. The else can be used when user clicks Alt+f4 for any other purpose

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