Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use special characters (swedish letters åäö).

Now, I have some folders, which contains images for classifieds. The folders are named by category.

for ($i=1; $i<=5; $i++){
    if (file_exists($big_images.$i.'.jpg')){ echo "Inne";
        unlink($big_images.$i.'.jpg');
    }
    if (file_exists($thumb_images.$i.'.jpg')){
        unlink($thumb_images.$i.'.jpg');
        }
    }

I allow up to 5 images on my site, each ending with a nr 1-5. However, my problem is this, whenever the folder-name has a special character, the file_exists returns false, ie it doesn't find the file. Even though it is there.

All documents are in utf-8 format.

This works when there is no special characters in the folder names.

If you need more input let me know

share|improve this question
    
Which OS are you using? –  zaf Apr 21 '10 at 18:57
    
wampserver, on local machine, windows –  Anonymous12345 Apr 21 '10 at 19:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

What's the server OS?

If it's Windows, you'll not be able to access files under a UTF-8-encoded filename, because the Windows implementation of the C IO libraries used by PHP will only talk in the system default code page. For Western European installs, that's code page 1252. You can convert a UTF-8 string to cp1252 using iconv:

$winfilename= iconv('utf-8', 'cp1252', $utffilename);

(utf8_decode could also be used, but it would give the wrong results for Windows's extension characters that map to the range 0x80-0x9F in cp1252.)

Files whose names include characters outside the repertoire of the system codepage (eg. Greek on a Western box) cannot be accessed at all by PHP and other programs using the stdio. There are scripting languages that can use native-Unicode filenames through Win32 APIs, but PHP5 isn't one of them.

And of course the step above shouldn't be used when deployed on a different OS where the filesystem is UTF-8-encoded. (ie. modern Linux.)

If you need to seamlessly cross-server-compatible with PHP, you'll have to refrain from using non-ASCII characters in filenames. Sorry.

share|improve this answer
    
I am encountering this issue on a system that, due to use case requirements, must be hosted on a Windows machine, and must contend with files that have characters outside of the 1252 codepage. I've found that the DirectoryIterator and SplFileInfo libraries are able to interact with these files. iconv throws warnings about invalid characters, and file_exists will fail in many circumstances. +1 from me for getting me on the track that eventually lead to our half-measure solution, and again note that SplFileInfo seems to be a more universal solution. –  Chris Baker Jan 7 at 16:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.