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I'm running a django project on Centos 5.4 and serving it with httpd/mod_wsgi. I can't figure out the correct permissions for /home/website/django_project so that I don't get a 403 error.

In my httpd.conf the user and group to run httpd as is apache. The group django is set up with website and apache as members. The owner of /home/website and all subdirs is website:django, and the permissions are rwxrwx---. Right now the project works fine with the dev server, but if I try to view it through apache, I get a 403 error. chmod -R o+rx /home/website/django_project fixes the problem, but this obviously isn't a good solution.

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, try setting the group-sticky bit on the directories:

find /home/website -type d -exec chmod g+s {} \;

Then the perms should read rwxrws---. See if this makes a difference.

If that fails, you can try to poke around as the "website" user and see what happens. Temporarily give the user "website" a home directory (not /home/website, it needs to be something else, like /var/home/website), password, and login shell, then use su - website to switch to it. Try listing the contents of /home/website and try reading files in there. Fix any problems.

Hope this helps.

P.S. I'm assuming /var/log/apache/access_log (or maybe it's /var/log/http/access_log) doesn't have anything useful.

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the sticky bit did it. thanks. –  Kevin Apr 21 '10 at 23:50
1  
IIRC, without the sticky bit, apache tries to access the directory as group "apache", which is the (default) group that executed the server. The sticky bit tells the OS to use the directory's group in that directory instead. –  Mike DeSimone Apr 21 '10 at 23:52
    
The sticky bit should only apply when writing files to the directory not read files from directory. –  Graham Dumpleton Apr 22 '10 at 1:40
    
Makes me wonder if mod_wsgi is trying to write to the directory. ... But are you sure, since you have to have execute permission on a directory to read its contents? –  Mike DeSimone Apr 22 '10 at 4:27
    
I'm not sure exactly what's going on. Before I did g+s, the permissions had to be rwxrwxr-x to prevent a 403 error. After g+s, rwxrwx--- works ok. The owner of everything is website:django, where django:x:505:apache,website. I had previously tried setting the owner to website:apache with no luck. –  Kevin Apr 22 '10 at 20:02

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