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Here is some C++ code I'm playing around with:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

#define IN ,
#define FOREACH(x,y) for(unsigned int i=0;i<y.size();i++) { x=y[i];
#define ENDFOREACH }

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int> ints;
    ints.push_back(3);
    ints.push_back(4);
    ints.push_back(5);
    ints.push_back(6);

    FOREACH(int item IN ints)
        cout << item;
    ENDFOREACH

    return 0;
}

However, I get an error:

macro "FOREACH" requires 2 arguments, but only 1 given

The code compiles if I change the IN to a comma. How can I get the IN to take the place of a comma?

Update: for those interested, here is the final version, which, if I do say so myself, is quite nice.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

#define in ,
#define as ,
#define FOREACH_(x,y,z) \
        y x; \
        if(z.size()) x = z[0]; \
        for(unsigned int i=0,item;i<z.size();i++,x=z[i])
#define foreach(x) FOREACH_(x)

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int> ints;
    ints.push_back(3);
    ints.push_back(4);
    ints.push_back(5);
    ints.push_back(6);

    foreach(item as int in ints)
    {
        cout << item << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Have you considered Boost.Foreach? (boost.org/doc/libs/1_42_0/doc/html/foreach.html) –  James McNellis Apr 21 '10 at 23:46
1  
This doesn't work because C++ is not Python. –  rlbond Apr 21 '10 at 23:52
    
possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1262063/… –  dmckee Apr 21 '10 at 23:54
    
...also stackoverflow.com/questions/1736654/… and possibly others from stackoverflow.com/search?q=c+c%2B%2B+preprocessor+macro+expand . Based on George Edison's comment below. –  dmckee Apr 21 '10 at 23:56
    
@rlbond: Python is not the only language to have a foreach structure written similarly to this. Additionally, Python doesn't use any END* keywords. –  Wallacoloo Apr 22 '10 at 0:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Others have already explained why it doesn't compile as is.

In order to make it work you have to give that IN a chance to turn into a comma. For that you can introduce an extra level of "indirection" in your macro definition

#define IN , 
#define FOREACH_(x,y) for(unsigned int i=0;i<y.size();i++) { x=y[i]; 
#define FOREACH(x) FOREACH_(x)
#define ENDFOREACH } 

In this case you'll have to use some substitute for comma (like your IN) and can no longer specify comma explicitly. I.e. now this

FOREACH(int item IN ints) 
    cout << item; 
ENDFOREACH 

compiles fine, while

FOREACH(int item, ints) 
    cout << item; 
ENDFOREACH 

does not.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hey, that's slick. Works like a charm. –  Nathan Osman Apr 21 '10 at 23:57
    
Very interesting solution. I have done plenty of C preprocessor hackery, and I never knew you could do this. –  Zifre Apr 22 '10 at 0:00
    
Me neither. You deserve more than one upvote. –  Nathan Osman Apr 22 '10 at 0:08

The compiler doesn't expand the IN macro before it reads the arguments to FOREACH. In fact, I think this is intentional (so that you can pass a comma to a macro).

Unfortunately, you'll have to use FOREACH(int item, ints).

You could also #define IN (make it nothing) and then use FOREACH(int item, IN ints), which is not quite as nice, but is acceptable.

That said, you may just want to use STL or Boost for foreach, unless you specifically want to create your own.

share|improve this answer
    
would the IN macro be expanded if it was called ? FOREACH(int item IN() ints) ? –  George Godik Apr 21 '10 at 23:50
    
@George: no, it wouldn't. If you need more flexibility with macros, you may want to feed your code through a more advanced preprocessor such as M4. –  Zifre Apr 21 '10 at 23:55
    
I specifically want to create my own. –  Nathan Osman Apr 21 '10 at 23:56

Expansion for IN doesn't happen early enough in your example, but you can pass the expanded version to another macro:

#define FOREACH(x) DO_FOREACH(x)
#define DO_FOREACH(x,y) for( ... ) ...
share|improve this answer
#define IN ,
#define XFOREACH(x,y) for(unsigned int i=0;i<y.size();i++) { x=y[i];
#define FOREACH(x) XFOREACH(x)
#define ENDFOREACH }

As previous posters have noted, the preprocessor does not expand macros in the arglist before it splits it into argument. However, as long as the macro doesn't use # or ##, it expands macros in the args before substituting them into the macro body, so an extra indirection does the trick

share|improve this answer

Check out BOOST_FOREACH - it does what you want

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_35_0/doc/html/foreach.html

share|improve this answer
    
No, I am trying to do this myself. I don't actually need the functionality - this is something I'm playing around with. –  Nathan Osman Apr 21 '10 at 23:50
1  
Edison: "No. I am trying to do this myself." In that case this is a duplicate of the several other "Why can't I get marco-in-macro to work?" questions. –  dmckee Apr 21 '10 at 23:53
    
yes - but boost is a good place to look at working code ( especially since it does exactly what you are trying to figure out ) –  George Godik Apr 21 '10 at 23:55

The preprocessor doesn't expand the IN to a comma until after it reads the arguments to FOREACH.

I'm pretty sure that the c++ preprocessor is one pass only, so you'll have to use:

FOREACH(int item, ints)
    cout << item;
ENDFOREACH
share|improve this answer

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