Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a dead-simple interface for an IRC library, like so:

import simpleirc

connection = simpleirc.Connect('irc.freenode.net', 6667)
channel = connection.join('foo')
find_command = re.compile(r'google ([a-z]+)').findall

for msg in channel:
    for t in find_command(msg):
        channel.say("http://google.com/search?q=%s" % t)

Working from their example, I'm running into trouble (code is a bit lengthy, so I pasted it here). Since the call to channel.__next__ needs to be returned when the callback <IRCClient instance>.privmsg is called, there doesn't seem to be a clean option. Using exceptions or threads seems like the wrong thing here, is there a simpler (blocking?) way of using twisted that would make this possible?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In general, if you're trying to use Twisted in a "blocking" way, you're going to run into a lot of difficulties, because that's neither the way it's intended to be used, nor the way in which most people use it.

Going with the flow is generally a lot easier, and in this case, that means embracing callbacks. The callback-style solution to your question would look something like this:

import re
from twisted.internet import reactor, protocol
from twisted.words.protocols import irc

find_command = re.compile(r'google ([a-z]+)').findall

class Googler(irc.IRCClient):
    def privmsg(self, user, channel, message):
        for text in find_command(message):
            self.say(channel, "http://google.com/search?q=%s" % (text,))

def connect():
    cc = protocol.ClientCreator(reactor, Googler)
    return cc.connectTCP(host, port)

def run(proto):
    proto.join(channel)

def main():
    d = connect()
    d.addCallback(run)
    reactor.run()

This isn't absolutely required (but I strongly suggest you consider trying it). One alternative is inlineCallbacks:

import re
from twisted.internet import reactor, protocol, defer
from twisted.words.protocols import irc

find_command = re.compile(r'google ([a-z]+)').findall

class Googler(irc.IRCClient):
    def privmsg(self, user, channel, message):
        for text in find_command(message):
            self.say(channel, "http://google.com/search?q=%s" % (text,))

@defer.inlineCallbacks
def run():
    cc = protocol.ClientCreator(reactor, Googler)
    proto = yield cc.connectTCP(host, port)
    proto.join(channel)

def main():
    run()
    reactor.run()

Notice no more addCallbacks. It's been replaced by yield in a decorated generator function. This could get even closer to what you asked for if you had a version of Googler with a different API (the one above should work with IRCClient from Twisted as it is written - though I didn't test it). It would be entirely possible for Googler.join to return a Channel object of some sort, and for that Channel object to be iterable like this:

@defer.inlineCallbacks
def run():
    cc = protocol.ClientCreator(reactor, Googler)
    proto = yield cc.connectTCP(host, port)
    channel = proto.join(channel)
    for msg in channel:
        msg = yield msg
        for text in find_command(msg):
            channel.say("http://google.com/search?q=%s" % (text,))

It's only a matter of implementing this API on top of the ones already present. Of course, the yield expressions are still there, and I don't know how much this will upset you. ;)

It's possible to go still further away from callbacks and make the context switches necessary for asynchronous operation to work completely invisible. This is bad for the same reason it would be bad for sidewalks outside your house to be littered with invisible bear traps. However, it's possible. Using something like corotwine, itself based on a third-party coroutine library for CPython, you can have the implementation of Channel do the context switching itself, rather than requiring the calling application code to do it. The result might look something like:

from corotwine import protocol

def run():
    proto = Googler()
    transport = protocol.gConnectTCP(host, port)
    proto.makeConnection(transport)
    channel = proto.join(channel)
    for msg in channel:
        for text in find_command(msg):
            channel.say("http://google.com/search?q=%s" % (text,))

with an implementation of Channel that might look something like:

from corotwine import defer

class Channel(object):
    def __init__(self, ircClient, name):
        self.ircClient = ircClient
        self.name = name

    def __iter__(self):
        while True:
            d = self.ircClient.getNextMessage(self.name)
            message = defer.blockOn(d)
            yield message

This in turn depends on a new Googler method, getNextMessage, which is a straightforward feature addition based on existing IRCClient callbacks:

from twisted.internet import defer

class Googler(irc.IRCClient):
    def connectionMade(self):
        irc.IRCClient.connectionMade(self)
        self._nextMessages = {}

    def getNextMessage(self, channel):
        if channel not in self._nextMessages:
            self._nextMessages[channel] = defer.DeferredQueue()
        return self._nextMessages[channel].get()

    def privmsg(self, user, channel, message):
        if channel not in self._nextMessages:
            self._nextMessages[channel] = defer.DeferredQueue()
        self._nextMessages[channel].put(message)

To run this, you create a new greenlet for the run function and switch to it, and then start the reactor.

from greenlet import greenlet

def main():
    greenlet(run).switch()
    reactor.run()

When run gets to its first asynchronous operation, it switches back to the reactor greenlet (which is the "main" greenlet in this case, but it doesn't really matter) to let the asynchronous operation complete. When it completes, corotwine turns the callback into a greenlet switch back into run. So run is granted the illusion of running straight through, like a "normal" synchronous program. Keep in mind that it is just an illusion, though.

So, it's possible to get as far away from the callback-oriented style that is most commonly used with Twisted as you want. It's not necessarily a good idea, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Sweet, thanks for the extensive post! I can't seem to get the last example working - getting "AssertionError: Don't run gConnectTCP from the reactor greenlet". Did I do something wrong? –  Andrey Fedorov Apr 22 '10 at 20:05
    
I think I'm confusing something about the third-to-last code quote: from where is the run() function supposed to be called? –  Andrey Fedorov Apr 22 '10 at 20:37
1  
I added another little code snippet and some text trying to explain it. I hope this clears things up. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Apr 24 '10 at 3:18
    
+1 for an amazing answer. –  Jeffrey Jose Apr 26 '10 at 8:10
    
It did, thanks! New to both greenlet and twisted, so the hand-holding is very much appreciated. Thanks again! –  Andrey Fedorov Apr 30 '10 at 0:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.