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I have 3 classes A,B,C .

Class A creates B .. class B creates class C.

Class C raises events after some action/operation with some data, which is handled by event handler in Class B.

Now I want to be handle or pass the same raised event data to Class A.

I know i can raise another event from class B and handle it in A but is there a better way of handling such events??

Edit : not using Inheritance.i will give a psuedo-code ..
please ignore syntax as such.I have done something like this.

Class A
{
   B objB;
   public void init()
   {
       objB= new B();
       addeventhandler(objB);  
       objB.init();

   }    
   //Suppose handle response_objB_Event handles event raised by C
     private void handleEvent_objB_Event(string message)
     {
        doSomething(message);
     }
}

Class B
{
  C objC;
    public void init()
   {
      objC= new C();
      addeventhandler(objC);
      objC.DoOperation();
   }

   //Suppose response_objC_Event handles event raised by C
     private void handleEvent_objC_Event(string message)
     {
        //doSomething(message);
        again raise event to pass 'message' to B.
     }

     private void doSomething(string message)
      {
         //.......do something

      }
}

Class C
{
      Event evtOperationComplete;
      public void DoOperation()
      {
         //.......do something

         // after coompletion 
            OperationComplete();             
      }

      public void OperationComplete()
      {
           RaiseEvent(evtOperationComplete,message);
      }

       public void RaiseEvent(Event E,String message)
       {
              // raise/invoke event/delgate here
       }
}

oh ok thx :) ..

Edit#2
Actually A is Form which creates B which is SocketManager and C is the actual socket class which sends and receives data..when C receives data/message , I want to display it on the Form i.e. A .so I raised events from C->B->A.

Thx

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you're not editing the data in the event handler of Class B, then simply have both class A and B subscribe to the event in C. If you're editing the data in B for A, then I'd recommend just calling a standard method in A with the data from B.

UPDATE: Based on your clarifications, I'd say just have 2 events - your socket (C) class fires an event when it has data, your socket manager (B) listens for this event and fires another, separate event when it has this data. Your form (A) listens for this event from B and acts on it. That makes your intent clear enough.

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nope not editing data in B for A. just want to handle data in A. –  Amitd Apr 22 '10 at 8:57
    
if subscribe to C's event in A doesn't it break encapsulation? –  Amitd Apr 22 '10 at 8:59
    
You have an inheritance heirarchy? Edit your question to make this clear. I read your question as having 3 seperate classes, each creating an instance of the next. –  Matt Jacobsen Apr 22 '10 at 9:37
    
done ..code added.. no inheritance. –  Amitd Apr 22 '10 at 11:55
    
Why are you doing this? If A, B, and C are independant of each other then they can fire events around as they please. If A is dependant on B's actions then make two completely separate events: one in C, which B listens for, and the other in B, which A listens for. –  Matt Jacobsen Apr 22 '10 at 12:10

Based on my previous answer, it sounds like you have an inheritance heirarchy:

public class A
public class B : A
public class C : B

in which case you shouldn't use events for this. Rather, use base to call each base class.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        C c = new C();
        c.DoStuff(0);
    }
}

public class A
{
    public virtual void DoStuff(int x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(x);
    }
}

public class B : A
{
    public override void DoStuff(int y)
    {
        y++;
        base.DoStuff(y);
    }
}

public class C : B
{
    public override void DoStuff(int z)
    {
        z++;
        base.DoStuff(z);
    }
}

This example shows creation of your class C and its subsequent editing of data. This data is then passed on to B, which edits the data again before passing onto A.

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