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I want to get a list of dates between start and end date.If i give the start and end date means, it give the result as the list of all dates including the start and end date.
Thanks in advance.

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11 Answers

I suggest to use Joda-Time for that

List<LocalDate> dates = new ArrayList<LocalDate>();
int days = Days.daysBetween(startDate, endDate).getDays();
for (int i=0; i < days; i++) {
    LocalDate d = startDate.withFieldAdded(DurationFieldType.days(), i);
    dates.add(d);
}

It wouldn't be too hard to implement your own iterator to do this aswell, that would be even nicer.

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1  
+1 definitely better than mine. –  extraneon Apr 22 '10 at 9:13
    
jodaTime is awesome! –  Ham Apr 22 '10 at 9:14
    
worked very well, thanks! –  Jeffrey Cameron Oct 16 '12 at 15:44
    
For alternative, see the answer by Krishnan on this same question. –  Basil Bourque May 29 at 19:05
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This one works better

 public static List<Date> obtenerFechasDiariasIntervalo(Date fechaInicial, Date fechaFinal)
{
    List<Date> dates = new ArrayList<Date>();
    Calendar calendar = new GregorianCalendar();
    calendar.setTime(fechaInicial);

    while (calendar.getTime().before(fechaFinal))
    {
        Date resultado = calendar.getTime();
        dates.add(resultado);
        calendar.add(Calendar.DATE, 1);
    }
    return dates;
}
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In general case the final list will not include the fechaFinal (ending date) when you are using before() method (which is equal to < operation). Instead the <= operation should be used. Since there is no equivalent method in Calendar class, you should increase the end date a bit. –  Alex Semeniuk Jul 25 '13 at 12:16
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please find the below code.

List<Date> dates = new ArrayList<Date>();

String str_date ="27/08/2010";
String end_date ="02/09/2010";

DateFormat formatter ; 

formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy");
Date  startDate = (Date)formatter.parse(str_date); 
Date  endDate = (Date)formatter.parse(end_date);
long interval = 24*1000 * 60 * 60; // 1 hour in millis
long endTime =endDate.getTime() ; // create your endtime here, possibly using Calendar or Date
long curTime = startDate.getTime();
while (curTime <= endTime) {
    dates.add(new Date(curTime));
    curTime += interval;
}
for(int i=0;i<dates.size();i++){
    Date lDate =(Date)dates.get(i);
    String ds = formatter.format(lDate);    
    System.out.println(" Date is ..." + ds);
}

output:

Date is ...27/08/2010
Date is ...28/08/2010
Date is ...29/08/2010
Date is ...30/08/2010
Date is ...31/08/2010
Date is ...01/09/2010
Date is ...02/09/2010

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This wont work around the end of daylight saving time since that day has 25 hours. You will get the next day repeated. Example for Germany: Date is ...30/10/2010 | Date is ...31/10/2010 | Date is ...31/10/2010 | Date is ...01/11/2010 (Simple solution: add some hours (12) to the start date) –  Carlos Heuberger Aug 26 '10 at 19:49
    
this worked.... –  John Sep 10 '13 at 9:14
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Something like this should definitely work:

private List<Date> getListOfDaysBetweenTwoDates(Date startDate, Date endDate) {
    List<Date> result = new ArrayList<Date>();
    Calendar start = Calendar.getInstance();
    start.setTime(startDate);
    Calendar end = Calendar.getInstance();
    end.setTime(endDate);
    end.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, 1); //Add 1 day to endDate to make sure endDate is included into the final list
    while (start.before(end)) {
        result.add(start.getTime());
        start.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, 1);
    }
    return result;
}
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java.time Package

If you are using Java 8, there is a much cleaner approach. The new java.time package in Java 8 incorporates the features of the Joda-Time API.

Your requirement can be solved using the below code:

String s="2014-05-01";
String e="2014-05-10";
LocalDate start = LocalDate.parse(s);
LocalDate end = LocalDate.parse(e);
List<LocalDate> totalDates = new ArrayList<>();
while (!start.isAfter(end)){
    totalDates.add(start);
    System.out.println(" "+start);
    start=start.plusDays(1);
}
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FYI, this exact same code would work using the Joda-Time library for those who cannot move to Java 8 yet. While java.time is not a drop-in replacement for Joda-Time, in this particular case the code happens to be the same. –  Basil Bourque May 29 at 18:44
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You can also look at the Date.getTime() API. That gives a long to which you can add your increment. Then create a new Date.

List<Date> dates = new ArrayList<Date>();
long interval = 1000 * 60 * 60; // 1 hour in millis
long endtime = ; // create your endtime here, possibly using Calendar or Date
long curTime = startDate.getTime();
while (curTime <= endTime) {
  dates.add(new Date(curTime));
  curTime += interval;
}

and maybe apache commons has something like this in DateUtils, or perhaps they have a CalendarUtils too :)

EDIT

including the start and enddate may not be possible if your interval is not perfect :)

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One solution would be to create a Calendar instance, and start a cycle, increasing it's Calendar.DATE field until it reaches the desired date. Also, on each step you should create a Date instance (with corresponding parameters), and put it to your list.

Some dirty code:

    public List<Date> getDatesBetween(final Date date1, final Date date2) {
    List<Date> dates = new ArrayList<Date>();

    Calendar calendar = new GregorianCalendar() {{
        set(Calendar.YEAR, date1.getYear());
        set(Calendar.MONTH, date1.getMonth());
        set(Calendar.DATE, date1.getDate());
    }};

    while (calendar.get(Calendar.YEAR) != date2.getYear() && calendar.get(Calendar.MONTH) != date2.getMonth() && calendar.get(Calendar.DATE) != date2.getDate()) {
        calendar.add(Calendar.DATE, 1);
        dates.add(new Date(calendar.get(Calendar.YEAR), calendar.get(Calendar.MONTH), calendar.get(Calendar.DATE)));
    }

    return dates;
}
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You do know that you use a deprecated API? Yeah., java date handling sucks. –  extraneon Apr 22 '10 at 9:12
    
Yeah, that's why I wrote, that this code is dirty. –  folone Apr 22 '10 at 9:23
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List<Date> dates = new ArrayList<Date>();
String str_date = "DD/MM/YYYY";
String end_date = "DD/MM/YYYY";
DateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy");
Date startDate = (Date)formatter.parse(str_date); 
Date endDate = (Date)formatter.parse(end_date);
long interval = 1000 * 60 * 60; // 1 hour in milliseconds
long endTime = endDate.getTime() ; // create your endtime here, possibly using Calendar or Date
long curTime = startDate.getTime();

while (curTime <= endTime) {
    dates.add(new Date(curTime));
    curTime += interval;
}
for (int i = 0; i < dates.size(); i++){
    Date lDate = (Date)dates.get(i);
    String ds = formatter.format(lDate);    
    System.out.println("Date is ..." + ds);
    //Write your code for storing dates to list
}
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With Joda-Time , maybe it's better:

LocalDate dateStart = new LocalDate("2012-01-15");
LocalDate dateEnd = new LocalDate("2012-05-23");
// day by day:
while(dateStart.isBefore(dateEnd)){
    System.out.println(dateStart);
    dateStart = dateStart.plusDays(1);
}

It's my solution.... very easy :)

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1  
FYI, that code might be a bit more readable if instead of compareTo you used dateStart.isBefore( dateEnd ). –  Basil Bourque Apr 10 at 16:57
    
yes, it was changed. Thanks. –  mfruizs2 Jul 1 at 7:35
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Like as @folone, but correct

private static List<Date> getDatesBetween(final Date date1, final Date date2) {
    List<Date> dates = new ArrayList<>();
    Calendar c1 = new GregorianCalendar();
    c1.setTime(date1);
    Calendar c2 = new GregorianCalendar();
    c2.setTime(date2);
    int a = c1.get(Calendar.DATE);
    int b = c2.get(Calendar.DATE);
    while ((c1.get(Calendar.YEAR) != c2.get(Calendar.YEAR)) || (c1.get(Calendar.MONTH) != c2.get(Calendar.MONTH)) || (c1.get(Calendar.DATE) != c2.get(Calendar.DATE))) {
        c1.add(Calendar.DATE, 1);
        dates.add(new Date(c1.getTimeInMillis()));
    }
    return dates;
}
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Why don't you use before() or after() methods to compare two Calendar instances ? –  Alex Semeniuk Jul 25 '13 at 12:07
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With Lamma it looks like this in Java:

    for (Date d: Dates.from(2014, 6, 29).to(2014, 7, 1).build()) {
        System.out.println(d);
    }

and the output is:

    Date(2014,6,29)
    Date(2014,6,30)
    Date(2014,7,1)
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protected by Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 9 '13 at 12:54

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