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Title probably doesn't make a lot of sense, so I'll start with some code:

class Foo : public std::vector<Foo>
{
};

...

Foo f;

f.push_back( Foo() );

Why is this allowed by the compiler? My brain is melting at this stage, so can anyone explain whether there are any reasons you would want to do this? Unfortunately I've just seen a similar pattern in some production C# code and wondered why anyone would use this pattern.

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Why shouldn't it be allowed? std::vector<Foo> is just yet-another-type, and you can inherit from it just like any other class type. That said, your example in particular is bad because most of the standard library isn't designed to be inherited from. –  GManNickG Apr 22 '10 at 9:37
    
@GMan: because std::vector<Foo> is a type that depends on Foo, which is just being defined. Or in other words: A foo is a vectors of foos, so a foo is a vector of vectors of foos, so a foo is a vector of vectors of vectors of foos... ad infinitum. –  sepp2k Apr 22 '10 at 9:41
    
@GMan - yeah it was just as simple an example as I could write - didn't want to pollute the example by having to define a template class. The Wikipedia article lists a couple of examples that I can kind of understand. My example is a simple dumb one though, agreed. @sepp2k yep it was the seeming recursion that confused me. –  stusmith Apr 22 '10 at 9:50
    
@sepp2k: and there is nothing wrong with that, welcome to recursive data structures. Linked list: struct LLNode { LLNode *next; }, binary tree struct BTNode { BTNode *left,*right; }. It's exactly the same thing. –  sbk Apr 22 '10 at 10:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

can anyone explain whether there are any reasons you would want to do this?

Curiously recurring template pattern.

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Many thanks, I didn't know the name and hence couldn't search for it! –  stusmith Apr 22 '10 at 9:43

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