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i bumped the other day into a little problem regarding C#'s properties.

Let's say i do have this setup:

public class Point
{
 public float X;
 public float Y;
}

public class Control
{
 protected Point m_Position = new Point();

 public Point Position
 {
  get { return m_Position; }
  set 
  { 
    m_Position = value; }
    // reorganize internal structure..
    reorganize();
  }

  protected reorganize()
  {
   // do some stuff
  }
}

This is all fine, but when it comes to usage, i could write something like:

Control myControl = new Control();
myControl.Position.X = 1.0f;

The thing is, my Control class wont recognize that the Position has been changed because set hasn't been called.

So i guess my question is, is there a way to make Control aware of any Position changes?

Thanks in advance!

Mfg Imp

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1  
Do you mean public Point Position as the property, not public Position? –  Lazarus Apr 22 '10 at 12:18
    
Yes, my mistake. –  impmja Apr 22 '10 at 12:26
    
If you want X and Y public, is better struct Point than class Point –  Andersson Melo Apr 22 '10 at 12:30

5 Answers 5

There are a number of options in this case:

  1. Make the X and Y properties of your Point class immutable. That is, require the user to create a new Point whenever X or Y changes.
  2. Setup an event on the Point class and subscribe to it on the Position class. Whenever the Point's X or Y changes, fire the event. The Position class can handle side-effects in the event handler.

In this case, I would suggest option #1

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1  
A third variant, if you need to update X and Y very often, would be to abandon the Point class entirely and have two properties PositionX and PositionY on the class. In this case it's more efficient than creating a new object/firing an event every time something changes. –  Fönsi Apr 22 '10 at 12:27
    
Excellent point! –  Tom Cabanski Apr 22 '10 at 12:31
1  
Instead of your first propsition, I think one would be better to use a struct for the Point class. –  Danvil Apr 22 '10 at 12:33
    
Making the Point class an immutable struct solve all sorts of problems. What made me a convert was Bill Wagner's 'Effective C# book' - 'Item 7: Prefer Immutable Atomic Value Types'. Also, Bill makes the case for struct vs. class in his blog: srtsolutions.com/public/item/251137 –  Mark Booth Apr 22 '10 at 13:05
    
Incidentally, this original question is dealt with very well by Wagner in in 'Effective C#' - 'Item 23: Avoid Returning References to Internal Class Objects'. –  Mark Booth Apr 22 '10 at 13:38

The statement myControl.Position.X = 1.0f; actually calls the getter and not the setter of your Position property. A way to do what you want to do could be by exposing the X and Y values directly on your class, like so:

public class Control  
{  
 protected Point m_Position = new Point();  

 public float PositionX
 {  
  get { return m_Position.X; }  
  set   
  {   
    m_Position.X = value; }  
    // reorganize internal structure..  
    reorganize();  
  }  

  ... Same thing for PositionY

  protected reorganize()  
  {  
   // do some stuff  
  }  
}

Another way would be to implement some event on the Position class that is raised every time X or Y change. This would entail making X and Y into properties on the Point object, and raising an event each time they are changed. Your control would then have to subscribe to that event.

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This does indeed work, but then i can't use Position directly anymore which i try to keep :) –  impmja Apr 22 '10 at 12:42

1) Make Point.X and Point.Y private. 2) Add properties for X and Y to Point. 3) Add an event to Point that is raised when either X or Y are modified. 4) Register Control as a listener for the events that are raised by Point.

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You could make public class Point a public struct Point. This way, the compiler will force you to write

myControl.Position = new Point() { X = 1.0f, Y = myControl.Position.Y; }

and the property setter is called.

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Well this comes down to the solution Tom Cabanski posted, making Point immutable. This is most likely the "best" way to achive more control. Point is, its kind of unflexable. I really wonder why C# does not implement this in the first place.. –  impmja Apr 22 '10 at 12:44

This should fix it! I have added a line into your getter that tests to see if the point is null and if it is instantiate it before returning.

public class Point
{
 public float X;
 public float Y;
}

public class Control
{
 protected Point m_Position = new Point();

 public Point Position
 {
  get 
  { 
      if (m_Position == null) m_Position = new Point();
      return m_Position; 
  }
  set 
  { 
    m_Position = value; 
    // reorganize internal structure..
    reorganize();
  }

  }

  protected reorganize()
  {
   // do some stuff
  }
}

HTH

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If people are going to down vote at least post a comment to provide a reason! The above code will directly solve the OP's problem and allow the code to work as per the OP's example. –  OneSHOT Apr 22 '10 at 12:21
    
Why? This clearly won't fix the problem he's having and why check for null if m_Position is initialized when creating the control –  RvdK Apr 22 '10 at 12:23
    
I didn't downvote, but it won't solve the OPs problem, because as he already mentioned, the setter will never be called, only the getter. –  Fönsi Apr 22 '10 at 12:23
    
No it will not solve the problem. The real problem is that the setter is not called in his use case. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Apr 22 '10 at 12:23
    
@OneSHOT : The OP problem is to make Control object aware of changes made to its Point property (ie changing Point.X). Your solution does not fix this. –  Thibault Falise Apr 22 '10 at 12:24

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