Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've a terrible memory. Whenever I do a CONNECT BY query in Oracle - and I do mean every time - I have to think hard and usually through trial and error work out on which argument the PRIOR should go.

I don't know why I don't remember - but I don't.

Does anyone have a handy memory mnemonic so I always remember ?

For example:

To go down a tree from a node - obviously I had to look this up :) - you do something like:

select
    *
from
    node
connect by
    prior node_id = parent_node_id
start with
    node_id = 1

So - I start with a node_id of 1 (the top of the branch) and the query looks for all nodes where the parent_node_id = 1 and then iterates down to the bottom of the tree.

To go up the tree the prior goes on the parent:

select
    *
from
    node
connect by
    node_id = prior parent_node_id
start with
    node_id = 10

So starting somewhere down a branch (node_id = 10 in this case) Oracle first gets all nodes where the parent_node_id is the same as the one for which node_id is 10.

EDIT: I still get this wrong so thought I'd add a clarifying edit to expand on the accepted answer - here's how I remember it now:

select
    *
from
    node
connect by
    prior node_id = parent_node_id
start with
    node_id = 1

The 'english language' version of this SQL I now read as...

In NODE, starting with the row in which node_id = 1, the next row selected has its parent_node_id equal to node_id from the previous (prior) row.

EDIT: Quassnoi makes a great point - the order you write the SQL makes things a lot easier.

select
    *
from
    node
start with
    node_id = 1
connect by
    parent_node_id = prior node_id

This feels a lot clearer to me - the "start with" gives the first row selected and the "connect by" gives the next row(s) - in this case the children of node_id = 1.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Think about the order in which the records are going to be selected: the link-back column on each record must match the link-forward column on the PRIOR record selected.

share|improve this answer

I always try to put the expressions in JOIN's in the following order:

joined.column = leading.column

This query:

SELECT  t.value, d.name
FROM    transactions t
JOIN
        dimensions d
ON      d.id = t.dimension

can be treated either like "for each transaction, find the corresponding dimension name", or "for each dimension, find all corresponding transaction values".

So, if I search for a given transaction, I put the expressions in the following order:

SELECT  t.value, d.name
FROM    transactions t
JOIN
        dimensions d
ON      d.id = t.dimension
WHERE   t.id = :myid

, and if I search for a dimension, then:

SELECT  t.value, d.name
FROM    dimensions d
JOIN
        transactions t
ON      t.dimension = d.id
WHERE   d.id = :otherid

Ther former query will most probably use index scans first on (t.id), then on (d.id), while the latter one will use index scans first on (d.id), then on (t.dimension), and you can easily see it in the query itself: the searched fields are at left.

The driving and driven tables may be not so obvious in a JOIN, but it's as clear as a bell for a CONNECT BY query: the PRIOR row is driving, the non-PRIOR is driven.

That's why this query:

SELECT  *
FROM    hierarchy
START WITH
        id = :root
CONNECT BY
        parent = PRIOR id

means "find all rows whose parent is a given id". This query builds a hierarchy.

This can be treated like this:

connect_by(row) {
  add_to_rowset(row);

  /* parent = PRIOR id */
  /* PRIOR id is an rvalue */
  index_on_parent.searchKey = row->id;

  foreach child_row in index_on_parent.search {
    connect_by(child_row);
  }
}

And this query:

SELECT  *
FROM    hierarchy
START WITH
        id = :leaf
CONNECT BY
        id = PRIOR parent

means "find the rows whose id is a given parent". This query builds an ancestry chain.

Always put PRIOR in the right part of the expression.

Think of PRIOR column as of a constant all your rows will be searched for.

share|improve this answer
1  
I like "Always put PRIOR in the right part of the expression" - it does make it easier. Also putting "start with" at the start. –  Nick Pierpoint Apr 16 '09 at 10:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.