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Is it possible to do this sort of thing in Scala?

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4  
IMHO, a question should be self contained. Links for more details are okay, but citing two lines of haskell-code here wouldn't be too much work. –  user unknown May 11 '11 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

def quicksort[A](xs: Stream[A])(implicit o: Ordering[A]): Stream[A] = {
  import o._ 
  if (xs.isEmpty) xs else {
      val (smaller, bigger) = xs.tail.partition(_ < xs.head)
      quicksort(smaller) #::: xs.head #:: quicksort(bigger)
  }
}

It can be done with views as well, though it's bound to be much slower:

def quicksort[A](xs: List[A])(implicit o: Ordering[A]) = {
  import o._
  def qs(xs: SeqView[A, List[A]]): SeqView[A, Seq[_]] = if (xs.isEmpty) xs else {
    val (smaller, bigger) = xs.tail.partition(_ < xs.head)
    qs(smaller) ++ (xs.head +: qs(bigger))
  }
  qs(xs.view)
}
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Thanks but I would like to see the list-views implementation as well. –  Mahesh Apr 22 '10 at 16:08
    
@Mahesh The view implementation turns out to be tougher than I first imagined. I'll keep trying to see if something works. –  Daniel C. Sobral Apr 22 '10 at 21:36
    
@Mahesh Ok, got the problem ironed out. I was forgetting the .head on the concatenation line... Silly me. –  Daniel C. Sobral Apr 22 '10 at 22:31
    
@Daniel: can we replace the first line with quicksort[A <% Ordering[A]](xs: List[A]) = { ? –  Aymen Jul 29 '10 at 7:55
1  
Why isn't this lazy sort (or something like it) the implementation used for sorted, sortBy, sortWith, etc in Stream.scala (and SeqView?). Or is it? Is there any way to just use library built-in functions to sort lazily? Isn't sorted a "transformer?" The documentation says Stream "implements all its transformer methods lazily," but that doesn't seem to be the case here as far as I can tell? –  Brian Oct 1 '12 at 11:37

Yes!

Scala supports "lazy vals" as a way to defer calculation of a value until it's actually used. Much of the Scala 2.8 library is capable of working with lazily-defined collections.

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this doesn't answer the asked question. –  Hui Wang Oct 22 '14 at 14:09

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