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After a extensive debugging session I found that the problem was that I called the setter of a readonly property. Is there a trick to provoke a compiler warning when this happens? Because marking the setter private does not work.

Cheers,

CA


To make clear what I mean:

    private readonly List<SomeObject> _budget;
    public IEnumerable<SomeObject> Budget
    {
        get
        {
            return _budget;
        }
    }

Can be accessed with

A.Budget=new SomeObject();

without compiler {error,warning,message}

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In what scenario? 100% sure that if you call a private setter from code outside of the class, that won't ever compile. Am I missing something? –  Fede Apr 22 '10 at 13:22
1  
I don't see how this could work without an error. It looks like you want A.Budget=new List<SomeObject>(); but even then it should still give an error saying "Property or indexer 'Budget' cannot be assigned to -- it is read only" –  drs9222 Apr 22 '10 at 13:34
1  
@drs9222: Agreed; A.Budget is not assignable in the code that's listed. –  Adam Robinson Apr 22 '10 at 14:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You mixed something up here. In your example the compiler will yield an error if you try to do A.Budget=new SomeObject(); if the property Budget in class A does not have a setter. From here on I can only assume what your problem is.

My guess is that you would like the collection wrapped in the Budget property to be readonly. That's probably why you made it IEnumerable<SomeObject> whereas the private member is a List<SomeObject>. So even if you do do not have a setter you can still do (A.Budget as List<SomeObject>).Add(bla). To prohibit this you can use List.AsReadOnly like this:

private readonly List<SomeObject> _budget;
public ReadOnlyCollection<SomeObject> Budget
{
    get
    {
        return _budget.AsReadOnly();
    }
}
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Oops, you're right. Should have checked a third time before posting –  Anonymous Coward Apr 22 '10 at 13:49
    
@AnonymousCoward does this mean you do get an error? I know you've got your answer but I'm curious about what actually happened. –  drs9222 Apr 22 '10 at 13:53

If your property has a setter, it isn't read-only. Remove the setter to make it read-only.

public string MyProperty // not read-only
{
    get { return myPropertyBacking; }
    set { myPropertyBacking = value; }
}

public string MyProperty // read-only
{
    get { return myPropertyBacking; }
}
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Remove the setter.

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As it is it doesn't make sense but if you meant something like this for your example...

private readonly List<SomeObject> _budget;
public List<SomeObject> Budget
{
    get
    {
        return _budget;
    }
}

Can be accessed with

A.Budget.Add(new SomeObject());

That would work without error.

EDIT

bitbonk's latest edit is exactly where I was going with this! I was just waiting for confirmation of the problem.

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