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HI, I have a class property that is a list of strings, List. Sometimes this property is null or if it has been set but the list is empty then count is 0. However elsewhere in my code I need to check whether this property is set, so currently my code check whether it's null and count is 0 which seems messy.

if(objectA.folders is null)
{
    if(objectA.folders.count == 0)
    {
      // do something
    }
}

Any recommendation on how this should be handled? Maybe I should always initialise the property so that it's never null? Appolgies if this is a silly question.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

When I have List as a property, I usually have something that looks like the following (this is not a thread safe piece of code):

public class SomeObject
{
    private List<string> _myList = null;

    public List<string> MyList
    {
        get
        {
            if(_myList == null)
                _myList = new List<string>();
            return _myList;
        }
    }
}

Your code would then never have to check for null because the Property would be initialized if used. You would then only have to check for the Count.

share|improve this answer
    
You could do that but you may sometimes want to know if its been initialised = you could add another method for this - it can also be a little hard to debug because intellisense triggers the creation of the object – James Westgate Apr 22 '10 at 17:22
    
+1 indeed, collection properties should return empty collections instead of null. – Craig Apr 22 '10 at 17:22

Right now your code will Always throw a Null Pointer exception, you are checking for Null and if it IS null - you're trying to access an object which does not exist.

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I would recommend however using what Justin wrote below. stackoverflow.com/questions/2692964/… – Alex Khvatov Apr 22 '10 at 17:22

If for your application the collection being a null reference never has a different meaning than the collection being empty, then yes, I would say you should always initialize it and this way remove the null checks from the remaining code.

This approach only makes sense if the property setter does not allow to change it to a null reference after initialization.

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I disagree - why have an object created just to remove a coding check? – James Westgate Apr 22 '10 at 17:20
    
@James Westgate, I doubt that this would ever develop to be a performance or memory problem, so I put code simplicity and maintainability as the first priority, but it's just an opinion. – João Angelo Apr 22 '10 at 17:23
    
I guess if you are creating a reusable class or library that it may be a good idea. – James Westgate Apr 22 '10 at 21:13
    
@James Westgate, yes there are use cases and use cases and even edge cases. However I'm completely of the opinion that as a library user I should not have to check that a collection property for a given object is not null. Yes to initializing it, double yes to lazy initialize it where applicable, but a no to returning null. – João Angelo Apr 22 '10 at 22:33
    
I think we are in agreement then – James Westgate Apr 23 '10 at 7:46

You have three options (and you need to decide based on your project):

  1. Create a method to check for NullOrNoElements. Pro: Allows both null and no entries. Con: You have to call it everywhere you want to use the property.
  2. Preinitialize with a list. Pro: Thread-save and very easy. Con: will use memory even when not used (depending on how many instances you have this may be a problem)
  3. Lazy initialize Pro: Does only use memory when really used. Con: *NOT thread save.*
private List<string> lp = null;
public List<string> ListProp 
{ 
    get 
    { 
        if(lp == null) 
            lp = new List<string>(); 
        return lp; 
    } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for all the responses guys, they are excellent. Just wondering Foxfire, what do you mean by not being Thread-safe, I'm new to this so Threading is something I'm not familiar with anyway in regards to this. – Rubans Apr 23 '10 at 16:51
    
This means that you cannot get this property from different threads or you might run into issues. Normally one would assume that a property getter is always thread-save (can be called from any thread). However in this case it wouldn't be anymore. If you are sure that this library is never used with multithreading then it's not an issue. – Foxfire Apr 24 '10 at 0:33
    
OK I assume this is because we are effectively setting a value in the getter making it not thread safe since two threads could do the same thing? – Rubans May 4 '10 at 16:32

You could always initialize the property so it's an empty List. Then you can just check the count property.

List<String> Folder = Enumerable.Empty<String>();

I once wrote an extension method for ICollection objects that checked if they were null or empty

public static Boolean IsNullOrEmpty<T>(this ICollection<T> collection)
{
    return collection == null ? true : collection.Count() == 0;
}

public static Boolean IsPopulated<T>(this ICollection<T> collection)
{
    return collection != null ? collection.Count() > 0 : false;
}
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You could do this in a single IF

if(objectA.folders is null || objectA.folders.count == 0)

Or you could create a boolean property in the class which checks this status for you and returns a result

public bool objectA.FolderIsNullOrEmpty
{
    get { return objectA.folders is null || objectA.folders.count == 0;}
}

If it does not make a difference to your application, I would rather recomend initializing the List to start with.

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You could handle this by initializing the object in the constructor. This is usually where this type of thing is done. Although I see nothing wrong with your current code. No point in initializing stuff that doesn't exist yet, it just wastes memory.

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Its a good question. I would add a method to objectA FoldersNullOrEmpty() that you can use eg

public virtual FoldersNullOrEmpty()
{
   return (folders == null || folders.count == 0)
}
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I almost always initialize lists and even make sure they can't be set to null if exposed by any setters. This makes using them much easier.

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