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I have the following routine that dumps a DataTable into an Excel worksheet.

    private void RenderDataTableOnXlSheet(DataTable dt, Excel.Worksheet xlWk, 
                                    string [] columnNames, string [] fieldNames)
    {
        // render the column names (e.g. headers)
        for (int i = 0; i < columnNames.Length; i++)
            xlWk.Cells[1, i + 1] = columnNames[i];

        // render the data 
        for (int i = 0; i < fieldNames.Length; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < dt.Rows.Count; j++)
            {
                xlWk.Cells[j + 2, i + 1] = dt.Rows[j][fieldNames[i]].ToString();
            }
        }
    }

For whatever reason, dumping DataTable of 25 columns and 400 rows takes about 10-15 seconds on my relatively modern PC. Takes even longer testers' machines.

Is there anything I can do to speed up this code? Or is interop just inherently slow?

SOLUTION: Based on suggestions from Helen Toomik, I've modified the method and it should now work for several common data types (int32, double, datetime, string). Feel free to extend it. The speed for processing my dataset went from 15 seconds to under 1.

    private void RenderDataTableOnXlSheet(DataTable dt, Excel.Worksheet xlWk, string [] columnNames, string [] fieldNames)
    {
        Excel.Range rngExcel = null;
        Excel.Range headerRange = null;

        try
        {
            // render the column names (e.g. headers)
            for (int i = 0; i < columnNames.Length; i++)
                xlWk.Cells[1, i + 1] = columnNames[i];

            // for each column, create an array and set the array 
            // to the excel range for that column.
            for (int i = 0; i < fieldNames.Length; i++)
            {
                string[,] clnDataString = new string[dt.Rows.Count, 1];
                int[,] clnDataInt = new int[dt.Rows.Count, 1];
                double[,] clnDataDouble = new double[dt.Rows.Count, 1];

                string columnLetter = char.ConvertFromUtf32("A".ToCharArray()[0] + i);
                rngExcel = xlWk.get_Range(columnLetter + "2", Missing.Value);
                rngExcel = rngExcel.get_Resize(dt.Rows.Count, 1);

                string dataTypeName = dt.Columns[fieldNames[i]].DataType.Name;

                for (int j = 0; j < dt.Rows.Count; j++)
                {
                    if (fieldNames[i].Length > 0)
                    {
                        switch (dataTypeName)
                        {
                            case "Int32":
                                clnDataInt[j, 0] = Convert.ToInt32(dt.Rows[j][fieldNames[i]]);
                                break;
                            case "Double":
                                clnDataDouble[j, 0] = Convert.ToDouble(dt.Rows[j][fieldNames[i]]);
                                break;
                            case "DateTime":
                                if (fieldNames[i].ToLower().Contains("time"))
                                    clnDataString[j, 0] = Convert.ToDateTime(dt.Rows[j][fieldNames[i]]).ToShortTimeString();
                                else if (fieldNames[i].ToLower().Contains("date"))
                                    clnDataString[j, 0] = Convert.ToDateTime(dt.Rows[j][fieldNames[i]]).ToShortDateString();
                                else 
                                    clnDataString[j, 0] = Convert.ToDateTime(dt.Rows[j][fieldNames[i]]).ToString();

                                break;
                            default:
                                clnDataString[j, 0] = dt.Rows[j][fieldNames[i]].ToString();
                                break;
                        }
                    }
                    else
                        clnDataString[j, 0] = string.Empty;
                }

                // set values in the sheet wholesale.
                if (dataTypeName == "Int32") 
                    rngExcel.set_Value(Missing.Value, clnDataInt);
                else if (dataTypeName == "Double")
                    rngExcel.set_Value(Missing.Value, clnDataDouble);                             
                else
                    rngExcel.set_Value(Missing.Value, clnDataString);
            }


            // figure out the letter of the last column (supports 1 letter column names)
            string lastColumn = char.ConvertFromUtf32("A".ToCharArray()[0] + columnNames.Length - 1);

            // make the header range bold
            headerRange = xlWk.get_Range("A1", lastColumn + "1");
            headerRange.Font.Bold = true;

            // autofit for better view
            xlWk.Columns.AutoFit();

        }
        finally
        {
            ReleaseObject(headerRange);
            ReleaseObject(rngExcel);
        }
    }

    private void ReleaseObject(object obj)
    {
        try
        {
            System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.ReleaseComObject(obj);
            obj = null;
        }
        catch
        {
            obj = null;
        }
        finally
        {
            GC.Collect();
        }
    }
share|improve this question
2  
I know you already have an answer, but I wanted to share the link to the library I mentioned in my post. I updated the post with the link. npoi.codeplex.com –  Chris Taylor Apr 23 '10 at 8:40
    
@Chris Thanks. Looks interesting. –  AngryHacker Apr 23 '10 at 17:07
    
This is very good. The only thing I would recommend is to put the type comparison stuff outside the for loop for the rows. It would mean you'd have have to have a loop for each type, but then you don't have to compare types for every row. But either way, very helpful. –  zumalifeguard Sep 11 '14 at 15:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Instead of setting cell values one by one, do it in a batch.

Step 1. Transfer the data from your DataTable into an array with the same dimensions.

Step 2. Define an Excel Range object that spans the appropriate range.

Step 3. Set the Range.Value to the array.

This will be a lot faster because you will have a total two calls across the Interop boundary (one to get the Range object, one to set its value), instead of two per cell (get cell, set value).

There is some sample code at MSDN KB article 302096.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, this did the trick. Thanks. I'll change the question to reflect the final code, so that other people can use it. –  AngryHacker Apr 22 '10 at 22:52

Interop is inherently very slow. There is a large overhead associated with each call. To speed it up try writing back an object array of data to a range of cells in one assignment statement.

Or if this is a serious problem try using one of the Managed Code Excel extensions that can read/write data using managed code via the XLL interface. (Addin Express, Managed XLL etc.)

share|improve this answer

Do you have a specific requirement to go the COM automation route? If not, you have a few other options.

  1. Use the OLEDB provider to create/write to an Excel file
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/316934

  2. Use a third party library to write to Excel. Depending on your licensing requirements there are a few options. Update: A good free library is NPOI http://npoi.codeplex.com/

  3. Write the data to a csv file, and load that into Excel

  4. Write the data as XML which can be loaded into Excel.

  5. Use the Open XML SDK
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=C6E744E5-36E9-45F5-8D8C-331DF206E0D0&displaylang=en

share|improve this answer
    
All good suggestions. I can't go the #1 or #3 route because I am writing to multiple sheets and I have to do formatting. #4 and #5 can't do because users have Office 2003. #2 is a possibility. –  AngryHacker Apr 22 '10 at 18:49
1  
Using OLEDB you can write to multiple sheets. sheets.codeproject.com/KB/miscctrl/Excel_data_access.aspx Tomorrow I will update with a very good open source library I am using, but I just don't recall the name right now, it provides full control, formatting etc. –  Chris Taylor Apr 22 '10 at 19:44

If you have a recordset, the fastest way to write to Excel is CopyFromRecordset.

share|improve this answer

I agree with Charles. Interop is really slow. But try this:

private void RenderDataTableOnXlSheet(DataTable dt, Excel.Worksheet xlWk, 
                                    string [] columnNames, string [] fieldNames)
{
    // render the column names (e.g. headers)
    int columnLength = columnNames.Length;
    for (int i = 0; i < columnLength; i++)
        xlWk.Cells[1, i + 1] = columnNames[i];

    // render the data 
        int fieldLength = fieldNames.Length;
        int rowCount = dt.Rows.Count;
        for (int j = 0; j < rowCount; j++)
        { 
            for (int i = 0; i < fieldLength; i++)
            {
                xlWk.Cells[j + 2, i + 1] = dt.Rows[j][fieldNames[i]].ToString();
            }
        }
}

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
This code just changes the direction of spanning the DataTable. It did not improve the speed. –  AngryHacker Apr 22 '10 at 18:17

You could create an Excel add-in, with VBA code to do all your db heavy lifting. from .NET, all you'd need to do is instantiate Excel, add the add-in, and call the Excel VBA routine, passing any parameters to it that it needs to execute your SQL statements.

share|improve this answer
1  
it might help to add a bit more information here about how to achieve that, or at least link in an example. I think your answer is useful, but I suspect you're getting downvotes because it's a little terse. –  Chris Ballard Feb 20 '14 at 17:53

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