Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there a simple way to export the subversion logs to a CSV file?

I want to use them to approximate my hours spent on a project and doing so in an spreadsheet would be easy.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

This short Python script will provide a CSV with your SVN log output:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import csv
import subprocess
import sys
import xml.etree.cElementTree as etree

log_text = subprocess.Popen(['svn', 'log', '--xml'] + sys.argv[1:],
                            stdout=subprocess.PIPE).communicate()[0]
log_xml = etree.XML(log_text)

csv_writer = csv.writer(sys.stdout)

for child in log_xml.getchildren():
        csv_writer.writerow([
                child.attrib['revision'],
                child.findtext('date'), 
                child.findtext('author').encode('utf-8'),
                child.findtext('msg').encode('utf-8'),
        ])

It passes through command-line arguments to the underlying SVN call, so if you only want to see revision 34 and later, you can invoke it as follows:

$ svnlog2csv -r 34:HEAD >my_spreadsheet.csv 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This script worked great for me. – Johann Jul 25 '12 at 21:53

Thanx for the script ! I added this slight modification because our SVN repository is UTF-8 with accented characters (French) and the script borked :

#!/usr/bin/env python

import csv
import subprocess
import sys
import xml.etree.cElementTree as etree
import codecs

log_text = subprocess.Popen(['svn', 'log', '--xml'] + sys.argv[1:],
                            stdout=subprocess.PIPE).communicate()[0]
log_xml = etree.XML(log_text)

csv_writer = csv.writer(sys.stdout)

for child in log_xml.getchildren():
        csv_writer.writerow([
                child.attrib['revision'],
                child.findtext('date'),
                child.findtext('author'),
                child.findtext('msg').encode("utf-8"),
        ])

Cheers,

share|improve this answer
    
FYI - you don't need to import codecs to call encode on a string; that said, this is a useful addition, and I hope you'll forgive me for adopting it. Thanks! – Charles Duffy Dec 18 '10 at 3:17

Thanks all, very helpful. I found that on Windows computers the python csv_writer expects binary file output, otherwise extra carriage returns get emitted. The following script handles this case, and also removes newlines in the middle of commit messages (replaced with front-slash) to ensure one-line output.

#!/usr/bin/env python

import csv
import subprocess
import sys
import xml.etree.cElementTree as etree

log_text = subprocess.Popen(['svn', 'log', '--xml'] + sys.argv[1:],
                            stdout=subprocess.PIPE).communicate()[0]
log_xml = etree.XML(log_text)

if sys.platform == "win32":
    import os, msvcrt
    msvcrt.setmode(sys.stdout.fileno(), os.O_BINARY)

csv_writer = csv.writer(sys.stdout)

for child in log_xml.getchildren():
        csv_writer.writerow([
                child.attrib['revision'],
                child.findtext('date'),
                child.findtext('author'),
                child.findtext('msg').encode("utf-8").replace('\n','/'),
        ])

(Now, who else wishes svn log took the same options as git log?? ;-)

share|improve this answer

Another quick solution which I have had great success with is here at Chris' blog. It is a Java program which quickly converts it to a CSV file. You can also use the online version that is shown there. Usually he posts JavaScript articles, but I guess he knows Java too since they are supposedly pretty similar.

share|improve this answer
2  
Java != JavaScript they aren't 'similar' in anyway other than they have Java in the name; which someone at Netscape should be beaten for doing. – Jarrod Roberson Nov 30 '12 at 13:42

I found this handy little script

svn log -r {2015-05-01}:{2015-05-31} http://svn.company.co.id/dev/ |  tr -d '\n' | sed -r 's/-{2,}/\n/g' | sed -r 's/ \([^\)]+\)//g' | sed -r 's/^r//' | sed -r "s/[0-9]+ lines?//g" | sort -g | sed 's/ | /;/g' > list.csv

which exports svn log from dates 1st May 2015 to 31st May 2015 list.csv.. here i'm using semi colon as separators.. because my developers use commas in their notes..

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.