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gcc lovingly throws me this error:

bst.c:33: error: invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to incomplete type ‘struct BSTNode’

What makes BSTnode incomplete? Below are the struct definitions relevant to BSTnode.

struct BSTnode{

    struct BSTnode * left;
    struct BSTnode * right;

    struct hash minhash;
    struct hash maxhash;

    struct DHTid owner;
    int misses;
};

where we have:

struct hash{
    int hash;
};

struct DHTid
{
    int islocal;

    unsigned long addr;
    unsigned short port;
    struct DHTnode * node;
};

and currently:

struct DHTnode{
    int something;
};

EDIT: My actual code has the following structure:

struct DHTnode{...};
struct hash{...};
struct DHTid{...}; /*changed . to ; in pseudocode*/
struct BSTnode{...};

EDIT: user318466 pointed a missing semicolon, but there was still more wrong with it.

share|improve this question
    
Needs semicolons after the hash and DHTNode struct definitions. –  Boojum Apr 23 '10 at 5:32
    
@Boojum: sorry that was a copy paste error :/. it's actually in my code. –  piggles Apr 23 '10 at 5:33
7  
Always paste the original complete program. You see how much inconvenience this causes if you don't do it.. –  codaddict Apr 23 '10 at 5:38
    
One more thing struct hash has a variable called int hash;. Compiler is throwing error for that. If I correct it there is no error. Is it like it in the actual code? –  Naveen Apr 23 '10 at 5:42
1  
@Naveen: There's absolutely no problem with having a field named hash in a struct named hash. If your compiler complains about it, it must be a problem with your compiler. –  AndreyT Apr 23 '10 at 6:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You declared type struct BSTnode. You are applying sizeof to type struct BSTNode. Note the difference in capitalization: n and N. struct BSTNode is, of course, a completely unknown to the compiler incomplete type, which is what it is telling you.

share|improve this answer
    
facepalm. thanks. Also, thanks user318466 –  piggles Apr 23 '10 at 5:49

There is a missing ; at the end of:

struct DHTid{...}.

it should be:

struct DHTid{...};
share|improve this answer
    
I presume you mean DHTnode? unfortunately, it still gives me the same error. :/ –  piggles Apr 23 '10 at 5:47
    
No man, not DHTnode but DHTid. You've put a . instead of ; –  user318466 Apr 23 '10 at 5:48
1  
I'm assuming he means DHTid, where you have left a dot, not a semicolon, after the structure. Note that if you take the time to say "My code actually looks like this", we'll take your word for it, problems and all. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 23 '10 at 5:49
    
Oh. I didn't realize that he didn't read the rest of it. I was under the impression that structure was a more abstract term in the English language than a photographic imprint. –  piggles Apr 23 '10 at 5:53

Your header files probably #define one of your identifiers to be something you don't want.

share|improve this answer
    
I have no #defines. Also, before someone says I should paste the whole code, there are three files and some 500 lines. –  piggles Apr 23 '10 at 5:45

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