Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to make my Python library working with MySQLdb be able to detect deadlocks and try again. I believe I've coded a good solution, and now I want to test it.

Any ideas for the simplest queries I could run using MySQLdb to create a deadlock condition would be?

system info:

  • MySQL 5.0.19
  • Client 5.1.11
  • Windows XP
  • Python 2.4 / MySQLdb 1.2.1 p2
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

You want something along the following lines.

parent.py

import subprocess
c1= subprocess.Popen( ["python", "child.py", "1"], stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE )
c2= subprocess.Popen( ["python", "child.py", "2"], stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE )
out1, err1= c1.communicate( "to 1: hit it!" )
print " 1:", repr(out1)
print "*1:", repr(err1)
out2, err2= c2.communicate( "to 2: ready, set, go!" )
print " 2:", repr(out2)
print "*2:", repr(err2)
out1, err1= c1.communicate()
print " 1:", repr(out1)
print "*1:", repr(err1)
out2, err2= c2.communicate()
print " 2:", repr(out2)
print "*2:", repr(err2)
c1.wait()
c2.wait()

child.py

import yourDBconnection as dbapi2

def child1():
    print "Child 1 start"
    conn= dbapi2.connect( ... )
    c1= conn.cursor()
    conn.begin() # turn off autocommit, start a transaction
    ra= c1.execute( "UPDATE A SET AC1='Achgd' WHERE AC1='AC1-1'" )
    print ra
    print "Child1", raw_input()
    rb= c1.execute( "UPDATE B SET BC1='Bchgd' WHERE BC1='BC1-1'" )
    print rb
    c1.close()
    print "Child 1 finished"

def child2():
    print "Child 2 start"
    conn= dbapi2.connect( ... )
    c1= conn.cursor()
    conn.begin() # turn off autocommit, start a transaction
    rb= c1.execute( "UPDATE B SET BC1='Bchgd' WHERE BC1='BC1-1'" )
    print rb
    print "Child2", raw_input()
    ra= c1.execute( "UPDATE A SET AC1='Achgd' WHERE AC1='AC1-1'" )
    print ta
    c1.close()
    print "Child 2 finish"

try:
    if sys.argv[1] == "1":
        child1()
    else:
        child2()
except Exception, e:
    print repr(e)

Note the symmetry. Each child starts out holding one resource. Then they attempt to get someone else's held resource. You can, for fun, have 3 children and 3 resources for a really vicious circle.

Note that difficulty in contriving a situation in which deadlock occurs. If your transactions are short -- and consistent -- deadlock is very difficult to achieve. Deadlock requires (a) transaction which hold locks for a long time AND (b) transactions which acquire locks in an inconsistent order. I have found it easiest to prevent deadlocks by keeping my transactions short and consistent.

Also note the non-determinism. You can't predict which child will die with a deadlock and which will continue after the other died. Only one of the two need to die to release needed resources for the other. Some RDBMS's claim that there's a rule based on number of resources held blah blah blah, but in general, you'll never know how the victim was chosen.

Because of the two writes being in a specific order, you sort of expect child 1 to die first. However, you can't guarantee that. It's not deadlock until child 2 tries to get child 1's resources -- the sequence of who acquired first may not determine who dies.

Also note that these are processes, not threads. Threads -- because of the Python GIL -- might be inadvertently synchronized and would require lots of calls to time.sleep( 0.001 ) to give the other thread a chance to catch up. Processes -- for this -- are slightly simpler because they're fully independent.

share|improve this answer

you can always run LOCK TABLE tablename from another session (mysql CLI for instance). That might do the trick.

It will remain locked until you release it or disconnect the session.

share|improve this answer
    
That would just cause a OperationalError: (1205, 'Lock wait timeout exceeded; try restarting transaction'), no? –  Greg Nov 6 '08 at 22:10
    
@Greg: I think they're talking about one session doing LOCK TABLE A, and another session doing LOCK TABLE B. THey have to synchronize somehow at this point. Then session one attempts a LOCK TABLE B. When session two attempts LOCK TABLE A -- it will deadlock. –  S.Lott Nov 7 '08 at 10:56

I'm not familar with Python, so excuse my incorrect language If I'm saying this wrong... but open two sessions (in separate windows, or from separate Python processes - from separate boxes would work ... ) Then ...

. In Session A:

   Begin Transaction 
      Insert TableA()  Values()...

. Then In Session B:

Begin Transaction
  Insert TableB() Values()... 
  Insert TableA() Values() ...

. Then go back to session A

  Insert TableB() Values () ...

You'll get a deadlock...

share|improve this answer
    
How would I make sure they run at exactly the same time? –  Greg Nov 6 '08 at 22:12
    
Sorry, I meant to "manually" control when each of the three steps above are executed... First, Begin Transaction and insert tabe a in session A, then move to the other process and do the second chunk, then move to first process and (maybe have a user button to do this) execute the last chunk –  Charles Bretana Nov 6 '08 at 22:48
    
Without using Python or any other client code, I would just write the Insert statements in two SQL windows, and move back and forth from one to the other... But you want your code to "trap" and detect the deadlock... –  Charles Bretana Nov 6 '08 at 22:49
    
Can you put a timer in the first session between the first Insert and the second, that waits for tem seconds? Then after you start session A, start SessionB... The second half of Session A (After the 10 sec delay, would happen after Session B and that would create the deadlock... –  Charles Bretana Nov 6 '08 at 22:51
1  
Or use thread synchronization primitives to coordinate the threads. –  Ned Batchelder Nov 7 '08 at 2:52

Not sure if either above is correct. Check out this:

http://www.xaprb.com/blog/2006/08/08/how-to-deliberately-cause-a-deadlock-in-mysql/

share|improve this answer

Here's some pseudocode for how i do it in PHP:

Script 1:

START TRANSACTION;
INSERT INTO table <anything you want>;
SLEEP(5);
UPDATE table SET field = 'foo';
COMMIT;

Script 2:

START TRANSACTION;
UPDATE table SET field = 'foo';
SLEEP(5);
INSERT INTO table <anything you want>;
COMMIT;

Execute script 1 and then immediately execute script 2 in another terminal. You'll get a deadlock if the database table already has some data in it (In other words, it starts deadlocking after the second time you try this).

Note that if mysql won't honor the SLEEP() command, use Python's equivalent in the application itself.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.